PAIN CONTROL THROUGH THE CENTURIES…

Electrical stimulation for pain control was used in ancient Greece in 63AD.

It was reported (wikipedia.org) that pain was relieved by standing on an electrical fish at the seashore.

Through the 16th Century – 18th Century, various electrostatic devices were used for pain, and in the 19th Century a device called the electreat, along with other devices were used for pain control.

The first TENS machine for pain was patented in the UK in 1974.

Medicine in the 17th Century was mainly made up of herbal catalogues, although the practice of ‘bleeding’ with leeches to cure illness was quite common. But more harm than good was done as Doctors didn’t sterilize their hands or their instruments.

In the 17th Century a study of pain was a source of wonder with pain pathways illustrated by how particles of fire, in contact with the foot, travelled to the brain.

By the 18th Century public health and hygiene received more attention and the use of vaccinations began.

Acupuncture was first introduced into Europe during the 17th Century and controlled trials on chronic pain proved that acupuncture could help patients with pain. However, during the 19th Century the use of Acupuncture fell. Now, in the 20th Century it is being used so much for pain that it is being used in hospitals and is also include in insurance plans.

lumber spine

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8 thoughts on “PAIN CONTROL THROUGH THE CENTURIES…

  1. I can sometimes get relief with acupuncture and other times I can’t but I guess its like having a good plumber doing a job and another a bad one, it just depends who puts the needles in 🙂 x

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  2. I’m pleased that acupuncture is now part of health treatments – because it has worked for me. It finally cured my tennis elbow when other treatments were unsuccessful.

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    • It has helped me a lot with my thoracic pain which is very painful due to my neck fusions, and it has also helped my daughter with shin splint problems, so I give it a thumbs up as well :):)

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