WHAT IS THE RIGHT AND WRONG PAIN AFTER EXERCISE…

They say that if you have mild muscle soreness after working out then that is quite normal. They even say that most people with arthritis can exercise through mild discomfort.

However, if you have moderate to severe pain in a particular joint before exercising then its best to avoid that joint in your workout.

If you have moderate to severe pain during the exercise then you should stop exercising and consult your GP as this could actually be a sign that your joints may be damaged or inflamed.

Joint pain after exercise isn’t right so if you do get that then change to an exercise that puts less stress on your joints.

Finally, if you have moderate to severe joint pain the day after exercise then rest for the day and do a shorter or less vigorous workout next time.

According to LIVE WELL NHS UK muscle pain that shows up a day or two after exercising can affect anyone, regardless of your fitness level. But don’t be put off. This type of muscle stiffness or achiness is normal, doesn’t last long, and is actually a sign of your improving fitness.

Dr. Jonathan Folland, an expert in neuromuscular physiology from Loughborough University, explains how to avoid sore muscles after exercise. Sore muscles after physical activity, known as delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), can occur when you start a new exercise programme, change your exercise routine, or increase the duration or intensity of your regular workout.

When muscles are required to work harder than they’re used to, or in a different way, it’s believed to cause microscopic damage to the muscle fibres, resulting in muscle soreness or stiffness. DOMS is often mistakenly believed to be caused by a lactic acid build up, but lactic acid isn’t involved in this process.

Anyone can develop DOMS, even those who have been exercising for years, including elite athletes.It can be alarming for people who are new to exercise, and it may dent their initial enthusiasm to get fit. The good news is that the pain will decrease as your muscles get used to the new physical demands being placed upon them.The soreness is part of an adaptation process that leads to greater stamina and strength as the muscles recover and build. Unless you push yourself hard, you’re unlikely to develop DOMS after your next exercise session.

Any movement you’re not used to can cause DOMS – in particular, movements that cause the muscle to contract while it lengthens, called eccentric muscle contractions.DOMS typically lasts between three and five days.There’s no one simple way to treat DOMS. Nothing is proven to be 100% effective. Treatments such as ice packs, massage, tender-point acupressure, anti-inflammatory drugs (such as aspirin or ibuprofen), and rest may help ease some of the symptoms.

One of the best ways to prevent DOMS is to start any new activity programme gently and gradually. Allowing the muscle time to adapt to new movements should help minimise soreness. If the pain makes it hard to exercise, it’s advisable to refrain from the activity for a few days until the pain eases. Alternatively, you could focus on exercises targeting less affected muscles to allow the most affected muscle groups time to recover.

 

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