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HOW CAN OSTEOPATHY & KINESIOLOGY HELP WITH PAIN?…

Firstly, what is Osteopathy ? Osteopathy is an alternative medical technique that uses manipulation and massage to help distressed muscles and joints to help them work smoothly.

Treatment can improve many parts of the body by restoring normal movement in areas that have become dysfunctional. This can then allow the tissue to nourish, replenish and repair in a more natural way.

The treatment first began in 1892 when a Dr. Andrew Taylor Still (1828-1917) an American farmer, inventor and doctor, opened the first school of osteopathic medicine in the USA.

He looked for alternatives to medical treatments in his day which he felt were ineffective as well as harmful.

His new philosophy of medicine was based on the teachings of Hippocrates. The therapy aims to pinpoint and treat any problems that are of a mechanical nature. Our body’s frame consists of the skeleton, muscles, joints and ligaments and all movements or activities such as running, swimming, eating, speaking and walking depend on it.

Osteopathy is a way of detecting, treating and preventing health problems by moving, stretching and massaging a person’s muscles and joints. It is based on the principle that the well-being of an individual depends on their bones, muscles, ligaments and connective tissue functioning smoothly together.

When you first see an osteopath he or she will need to know the complete history of any problems you have , how they first occurred and what eases or aggravate matters so a diary kept over a week or more before your visit would be a great help. An award winning Website run by an Osteopath called The Bad Back Company can provide you with the very best help with back and joint pain and has a large online shop for all your needs.

Secondly, what is Kinesiology? Kinesiology is a treatment which concentrates on getting your muscles to function correctly. It is believed that each muscles is connected to a specific part of your body.

The word ‘Kinesiology‘ is derived from the Greek word ‘kinesis’, which means ‘motion’. It originated in 1964 and was developed by an American chiropractor called George Goodheart. He found that when he was treating patients for severe pain in the leg, that by massaging a particular muscle the pain seemed to ease. However this did not seem to work on all muscles.

An osteopath in the 1900’s a Dr. Chapman pointed out that there were certain ‘pressure points’ in the body which were connected to your muscles, and if these were massaged correctly the lymph would be able to flow freely throughout the body.

In the 1930’s it was also claimed that there were similar pressure points which were on the skull which, by putting a light pressure on them, the flow of blood to their related organs would be assisted.

A Kinesiologist will examine a patient and try to discover whether they are lacking in energy as well as any other problems which could relate to their symptoms. If they find blockages then they can treat the disorder by stimulating the flow of lymph and blood my massaging the pressure points.

Nowadays there are a number of therapies (acupuncture, osteopathy, myofascial release massage) that use pressure points to ease pain in the muscles.

After treatment by massage of the pressure points the patient would experience some tenderness for a couple of days as the toxins in the tissue dissipate gradually. However, there should be an overall feeling of an improvement in your health and in particular the areas that were treated.

So, which treatment is best for chronic pain? Well, when I search online it basically says that Kinesiology is a multi prong approach to pain management whereas an Osteopath generally treats acute conditions. Certainly over 30 years ago when my back first started going wrong I would regularly visit an Osteopath then as it became more chronic I visited a Chiropractor but I can honestly say that back then I had not even heard of Kinesiology.

Not Just Backs write that Research shows that manual therapy such as osteopathy can relieve pain, increase flexibility and improve quality of life for people with osteoarthritis. This is reflected in NHS guidelines which recommend manual therapy (stretching and manipulation), alongside exercise, weight loss and pain meds to manage symptoms.

Balance Wellness writes that Kinesiology uses the theory of muscle testing to discover the underlying causes contributing to health issues – be it physical, nutritional or emotional. The body clearly communicates to the practitioner what is needed. So, it’s not just a one off treatment but looks at nutritional recommendations, structural work, energy reflexes and emotional coaching to guide you back to your full health potential.

Personally, I think all alternative and complimentary therapies are worth a try to help with acute or chronic pain. What suits one might not suit another. What worked at first might stop working second time around but with some many alternative and complementary therapies available now, it has to be worth giving some a try.

#backpainblog, #BACKPAINBLOGUK, #fibromyalgia, #health, alternative therapies, BACK PAIN, CHRONIC PAIN, FIBROMYALGIA, HEALTH, Light Therapy, low back pain, lower back pain

GREEN LIGHT OR SAD THERAPY AS A TREATMENT FOR FIBROMYALGIA…

Green Light Therapy for Fibromyalgia. Green Light Therapy has been successfully used for migraines as it was shown to reduce the frequency and intensity of headaches and improve patient quality of life.

Light therapy is a way to treat seasonal affective disorder (SAD) and certain other conditions by exposure to artificial light. SAD is a type of depression that occurs at a certain time each year, usually in the fall or winter.

Photo by Felix Mittermeier on Pexels.com

During light therapy, you sit or work near a device called a light therapy box. The box gives off bright light that mimics natural outdoor light.

According to Pain News Network, a pilot study has found Green Light Therapy improves Fibromyalgia symptoms. Fibromyalgia patients exposed to green light therapy had significant improvements in their pain, sleep and quality of life, according to a new pilot study published in the journal Pain Medicine.

The small clinical trial by researchers at the University of Arizona is the first to explore the benefits of green light in treating fibromyalgia symptoms. Previous studies have focused on green light therapy as a treatment for migraine headaches. Green light is believed to have a calming effect on the brain and causes less eye strain.

In addition to less pain, patients also reported better mood and sleep, and improvements in their ability to work, exercise and perform chores. Eleven patients said they also reduced their use of pain medication, including opioids, while being exposed to green light.    

Although more research is needed to fully understand how green light therapy works, some commercial products are available to the public without a prescription. Details of which you can find on Pain News Network.

There are also a number of SAD Lights available from Amazon with some having a choice of three colour modes, and although not the exact ‘Green Light’, they do work on the same basis. The ones I found started from £39.99 so they are not too expensive if they do the trick.

This particular one utilizes full spectrum filtering out harmful UV light; delivers up to 10,000 lux intensity for effective light therapy to help you fight SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder), winter blues, circadian sleep disorders, fatigue and shift work. This light therapy lamp provides you with 3 color temperatures (daylight, natural light, warm light), 5 adjustable brightness levels and step-less dimming. Mini size and light weight takes up little space, equipped with holder, perfect for small spaces and on-the-go portability. It can be widely used at home, office, café shop, yoga class etc.

Another example is this FITFORT Alarm Clock Wake Up Light-Sunrise/Sunset Simulation Table Bedside Lamp Eyes Protection with FM Radio, Nature Sounds and Touch Control Function. Simply set your alarm time. The clock will gradually brighten from 10% Brightness to 100% in 30 minutes before the alarm time / dimmed from 100% Brightness to 0% in 30 minutes before the bedtime. Guide you to a restful natural sleep and develop a good sleep pattern. Wake up in the first sunlight of the day with abundant energy. The clock comes with 6 natural sounds such as piano, waves, violin, croak, beep. Or you can set your favourite radio channel as the alarm too. Touch the light button to choose you favourite colour, including green, red, blue, pink, orange and Indigo. It’s a reasonable £25.99 from Amazon. This one has just been put on my Christmas list.

#backpainblog, #BACKPAINBLOGUK, #fibromyalgia, #health, #homeopathy, alternative therapies, CHRONIC PAIN, complementary therapies

8 REASONS WHY YOU SHOULD GIVE A COMPLEMENTARY TREAMENT A TRY…

A Complementary Therapy is one that can be used in addition to, or instead of, conventional Western medicine. BUPA explain that Complementary therapies are methods of trying to treat illnesses, and these methods fall outside of conventional medicine. Some complementary therapies, such as acupuncture and reflexology, are based on older or traditional forms of medicine. Others, such as osteopathy and chiropractic, are more recent developments. Things like herbal medicine can be seen as a very rough precursor to modern medicine; there are many medicines that have been discovered through understanding the effects of natural substances. Herbal medicines can be seen as ‘unrefined’ medications, with varying doses and sometimes with other ingredients in them.

The word ‘complementary’ refers to the fact that they may be used in addition to the conventional medicine approaches advised by medical professionals. Here are 7 reasons why you should at least try one of them for chronic pain.

  1. It’s natural – Complimentary Therapies work naturally with the body to help restore balance.
  2. It an improve sleep, most Complimentary Therapies are great for relaxation and then sleep.
  3. You can chat with your therapist about your condition and sometimes just talking to someone can lift your mood.
  4. It’s more personal with some hands-on therapies.
  5. You can learn about many Complimentary Therapies and treat yourself. (I will cover this in another post).
  6. There are so many now available you are bound to find one that could help you but always book through a professional therapist.
  7. They can help you cope with your condition.
  8. Some are now available on the NHS like Acupuncture, Reflexology, Homeopath, Osteopathy, Chiropractic, Herbal Medicines, Counsellors, CBT and Tai Chi.