TAI CHI – A FIRST CHOICE OF TREATMENT FOR FIBROMYALGIA PAIN …

According to My Fibro Team, tai chi is one of the first choice of treatments for Fibromyalgia pain.

A new study was led my Dr. Chenchen Wang, of the Causes for Complementary and Integrative Medicine at Tufts Medical Centre in Boston.

His study included 226 adults who had Fibromyalgia for an average of nine years. The patients were an average age of 52 and the vast majority were females. None of the patients had tried tai chi nor any other type of alternative therapy for six months before the study started.

The findings showed that NONE of the patients who engaged in the tai chi reported any negative side effect or complication. One patient said it had helped to improve balance, reduce anxiety and manage pain.

The NHS has a guide to tai chi which says Tai chi, also called tai chi chuan, combines deep breathing and relaxation with flowing movements. Originally developed as a martial art in 13th-century China, tai chi is now practised around the world as a health-promoting exercise.

It is essentially a gentle activity that is unlikely to cause injury if done correctly. The exercises involve lots of flowing, easy movements that don’t stress the joints or muscles.

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THREE DIFFERENT TYPES OF BACK PAIN…

1. Acute Pain

Acute Pain is a pain that lasts less than 3 to 6 months, or pain directly related to tissue damage. This is the type of pain caused by a paper cut or needle prick. Other examples of acute pain are like labour pains, the pain is acute and identifiable.

Acute low back pain is defined as a pain present for up to six weeks. It could feel like an aching, stabbing, burning, or dull pain. The actual intensity of this type of low back pain could range from mild to severe and could fluctuate or move to other areas of your body like your hip or thigh area.

2. Chronic Pain

Chronic pain describes pain that lasts more than three to six months, or beyond the point of tissue healing. Chronic pain is usually less directly related to identifiable tissue damage and structural problems. Chronic back pain without a clearly determined cause, failed back surgery syndrome (continued pain after the surgery has completely healed), and fibromyalgia are all examples of chronic pain. Chronic pain is much less well understood than acute pain.

Chronic pain can take many forms, but is often described as a pain with an identifiable cause, such as an injury. Certain structural spine conditions, including degenerative disc disease, spinal stenosis, and spondylolisthesis, can cause ongoing pain until they are successfully treated.

3. Neuropathic Pain

Neuropathic pain could be placed in the chronic pain category, but it has a different feel than chronic musculoskeletal pain. The pain is often described as severe, sharp, lightning-like, stabbing, burning, or cold. The individual may also experience ongoing numbness, tingling, or weakness. Pain may be felt along the nerve path from the spine down to the arms/hands or legs/feet.

It is thought that the pain is caused by damage or disease affecting the somatosensory nervous system. Neuropathic pain may be associated with abnormal sensations called dysesthesia or pain from normally non-painful stimuli (allodynia). It may have continuous and/or episodic (paroxysmal) components.

FIBROMYALGIA FLARES – WE ALL HAVE THEM…

Fibromyalgia flares are something most Fibromyalgia sufferers go through and is a dreaded part of Fibro. They can make your life very miserable.

One thing I found helped me with a flare-up was by writing it in my diary when it happened and what I did to help with it and if it helped.

I also have a list of all the things I enjoy that take me away from my pain like one of my hobbies (making cards) and baking but maybe for you it’s Tai Chi or Yoga that helps. Just knowing something that works will help get through the flare-up.

Make a note in your diary of a particular treatment that helped or a medication or piece of equipment like a tens machine that helped.

Knowing that there is something you can do, use or otherwise for your flare-up, will get you through the worst days and back to controlling it as you normally do.

MAGNETIC BACK SUPPORT BELTS FOR TRAVELLING…

Magnetic back support belts are great for back pain but can also help avoid back pain by wearing them when you travel.

I have recently come back from a holiday which involved two long hall flights and I used a magnetic belt as well as a heat patch for both journeys. I am firm believer that if you go armed with a few different types of pain relief you can manage a journey pain free.

I would never travel without my coccyx cushion and have worn heat pads for a long time now but previously I wore a support back girdle which was made for me after one of my spinal surgeries, but it was far from comfortable to wear.

The Bad Back Company have a vast array of products for pain and their Back Support Belt has 20 High Grade ceramic magnets that generate a constant magnetic field over your low back. It costs £39.99 and you will never need to re charge the magnets. Their belt has a high quality adjustable support in a double layer for varied degrees of support and compression for your back. There are also a number of other Back Support Belts without the magnets also available from The Bad Back Company.

Heat has always helped me and it has 3 flexible boned supports to support your lumber spine and keep your muscles and joints warm to reduce muscular spasm or discomfort.

Please check their caution note for people who have pacemakers, defibrillators, insulin pumps or similar devices that are powered by a battery whether as an implant or an external unit. It is also not recommended for use during pregnancy. You can also watch a video about the back support on The Bad Back Company page.

The heat pads I use the Thermacare Advanced Back Pain relief pads which last up to 16 hours and are available from Amazon at £5.50 for 2.

 

TREATING ACUTE PAIN BEFORE IT TURNS INTO CHRONIC PAIN…

Although acute back pain can be frustrating to live with, they say that you should try to remain as positive as possible. Research has shown that people with a positive mental attitude tend to have quicker recovery times and are much less likely to progress from acute to chronic back pain.

For acute back pain, they say you should remain as active as possible. If you find it too painful to return to your normal daily activities immediately, pace yourself and aim to do a little more each day.

Going back to work can help you to return to a normal pattern of activity, and it can often distract you from your symptoms of pain so don’t wait until all the pain has gone before you go back.

People with back pain find that using either hot or cold compression packs helps to reduce pain. Personally, I prefer heat rather than ice.

Placing a small firm cushion beneath your knees when you are sleeping on your side, or using several firm pillows to prop up your knees when lying on your back, may also help to ease your symptoms.

If the symptoms persist then go and see your GP or a professional chiropractor or physiotherapist.