OSTEOPATHY TREATMENT FOR A BAD BACK …

Osteopathy is an alternative medical technique that uses manipulation and massage to help distressed muscles and joints, to help them work smoothly.

Treatment can improve many parts of the body by restoring normal movement in areas that have become dysfunctional. This can then allow the tissue to nourish, replenish and repair in a more natural way.

The treatment first began in 1892 when a Dr. Andrew Taylor Still (1828-1917), an American farmer, inventor and doctor, opened the first school of osteopathic medicine in the USA. He looked for alternatives to medical treatments in his day which he felt were ineffective as well as harmful.

His new philosophy of medicine was based on the teachings of Hippocrates. The therapy aims to pinpoint and treat any problems that are of a mechanical nature. Our body’s frame consists of the skeleton, muscles, joints and ligaments and all movements or activities such as running, swimming, eating, speaking and walking depend on it.

When you first see an Osteopath, (they were my first port of call when my back went wrong ) he or she will need to know the complete history of any problems you have, how they first occurred and what eases or aggravates matters, so a diary kept over a week or more before your visit would be a great help.

Osteopathy is a way of detecting, treating and preventing health problems by moving, stretching and massaging a person’s muscles and joints. It is based on the principle that the well-being of an individual depends on their bones, muscles, ligaments and connective tissue functioning smoothly together.

Osteopaths believe their treatments allow the body to heal itself. In my younger years I had a great Osteopath. I would go in and see him bent to one side and I would leave him straight. He kept me off the operating table for a number of years.

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HOW TO PREVENT BACK PAIN WHEN DRIVING…

The Foray Motor Group have written some of the best tips on how to prevent back pain when driving. It includes some of my own tips and others from Back on site, and Active Backs.

The main top tips include :

Tips for avoiding back pain while driving

  • Make sure your car is road worthy
  • Adjust your sitting position
  • Utilise lumbar support
  • Use heated seats
  • Be careful getting in and out of the car
  • Ice your back
  • Take regular breaks

“If your car happens to have heated seats, it’s definitely a good idea to make good use of them in your quest to prevent back pain. Heat has the great benefit of relaxing tight joints and muscles, helping blood flow to the area applied to, and therefore relieving pain. So next time you are out on a long drive and perhaps are starting to feel a little uncomfortable, consider turning that seat on. Barbara McLullich from Back Pain Blog – the personal journey of a chronic back pain sufferer – offers this advice: “I am a true advocate of heat while travelling so if your car does not have heated seats then buy a heat pad to pop on your back. You can buy these from a chemist and most last up to eight hours. Also, have some heat pads ready to use after your journey.”

Be careful getting in and out of the car

Another important thing to consider is the simple fact of how you get in and out of the car as this can have ramifications for your back health. Explaining what to be aware of and how you can help yourself, Barbara from Back Pain Blog says: “Pay attention to how you get in and out of the car. Sit down facing the door and swing both legs into the car. Getting out is the reverse. If this is too uncomfortable to do, you can buy swivel cushions to help you turn around.”

NOMINATION FOR WEGO HEALTH BLOG AWARD…

I’ve been nominated for a Wego Health Blog Award. Best in show Blog.

The WEGO Health Awards are the only awards program that recognizes Patient Leaders across all condition areas and platforms. With 15 award categories, there’s something for everyone.

The WEGO Health Awards are broken into 3 phases: nominations, endorsements & judging. Nominations and endorsements will close July 28th allowing their distinguished industry judging panel to take over and review the nominees.

Finalists will be highlighted during their virtual celebration September 18-20th where they will announce the 15 winners.

Anyone who is an active and leading member of an online community, and making a difference in healthcare, is eligible to be nominated. He or she should provide the community with valuable information and support to make a difference for other patients and caregivers. Nominees for an individual social channel award must have a presence on that particular social channel.

My nomination is for my blog and if you would like to nominate me for go to their WEGO Health Awards nominations page to get started. Tell them who you want to recognize, where you follow them online, at the WEGO Health Award.

ANOTHER LOVELY AWARD FOR BACK PAIN UK…

My lovely blog friend Terri from Reclaiming Hope, nominated me for a new blog award which Pamela Jensen from There is Always Hope has created.

Terri writes a lovely blog on learning how to thrive, not just survive, with Fibromyalgia. Terri is a regular visitor to my blog and always writes lovely enthusiastic comments on my blog posts. Her Wellness Wednesday posts are full of tips to improve or inspire you with the odd recipe thrown in every now and again.

When I started writing my blog back on 2007 it was a way of me writing down how I felt on my bad and good days and I soon found solace in my blog friends and have never looked back since. It still amazes me how I can have blog friends from all over the world. Receiving an award like this just makes it even more worthwhile. If Terri had not nominated it for me and someone else had Terri would have been on the top of my list to award her with one. Many thanks Terri, you know how chuffed I am.

The Chronically Hopeful Award is, in Pamela’s words, “to recognize the incredible people who blog about chronic illness, mental health. ”

Here are the rules:

• Thank your nominator

• Recognize Pamela from There Is Always Hope as the creator of this award with a link.

• Use the Chronically Hopeful Award logo somewhere in your post

• Copy these rules onto your post

• Answer your nominator’s questions

• Write 5-10 of your own questions (they don’t need to be illness related)

• Nominate 5-10 other chronic illness, mental illness, or disability bloggers

• Comment on each of your nominees’ latest posts to tell them they have been nominated

Terri’s questions to me...

What is the biggest lesson you’ve learned since starting your blog.

That it doesn’t matter where you are in the world the chances are you will get to know someone through your blogging who is going through the same as you

If you could tell people ONE thing about living with a chronic illness, mental illness or disability, what would you want the general public to know???

Never, ever, ever give up hope. I have a tile in my bathroom which has this written on it.

Why did you decide to start your blog/advocacy work?

I felt very lonely and didn’t have anyone to talk to about my conditions and started looking online (back in 2007) and found out all about blogs and I was hooked from the word go.

What is one thing you’re really good at?  Don’t be modest — tell us something you have a talent for!

Talking, I hardly ever stop. 😀

What do you like to do for enjoyment?

Blog (obviously) make gift cards, knit, and short breaks in the UK.

My nominees, all of whom I think deserve this award are…

Beverley Dickson from Blooming Mindfulness

Lee Good from Fibroblogger Directory

Carole Sian Scranton from Fibro Flutters

Poise and Prescence from Alexander Technique

Cindy from Validating Chronic Pain –

Claire Saul from Pain Pals Blog

My questions for my nominees are

1. How long do you spend blogging and do you blog daily?

2. What got you into blogging?

3. What three things do you love about Sunday’s?

4. Dog or cat?

5. Heat of cold when you are in pain?