4 BENEFITS OF OWNING A HOT TUB…

When owning your first home, it may be difficult to identify things that you need or would like to have in your first residence. Whether you closed on one of the Cincinnati houses for sale or just bought a home in a rural area, you’re likely going to have to fill it out with various furniture and amenities. An option that is gaining lots of popularity and traction all around the country is hot tubs. Hot tubs are often thought of as a luxury item, something that you should only install if you have some extra money in the bank. That being said, having a hot tub can provide you with many benefits and can be a great addition to your home. So what do you stand to gain from installing a hot tub, and is it worth the large price tag? Here are the benefits of owning a hot tub.

RELAXATION…

It’s no secret that we spend our lives constantly dealing with stress and anxiety. Whether it be from work, school, or personal relationships, stress and anxiety is extremely prevalent in our lives. Unfortunately this is a very bad thing, as constantly being stressed out and anxious about situations can be a major detriment to both your mental and physical health. Thankfully, using a hot tub can relax you and provide you with some amazing stress relief. There’s something extremely soothing about ending your night relaxing in a hot tub. Not only can you let your mind drift off and relax, but you’ll be massaged by the tub’s jets and soothed by the warm water surrounding you. If you have a hot tub, you’ll almost certainly be using it to escape the everyday stresses of life.

PAIN RELIEF…

Another huge benefit of having a hot tub is the pain relief that it can provide you. Many Americans suffer from some form of pain ranging from neck pain to lower back pain. In addition, many Americans may suffer from ailments like arthritis or even major physical injuries like a sprained ankle. While using a hot tub certainly won’t make all of the pain go away, it certainly can go a long way in helping you cope with it. The relaxation that comes with being in a hot tub can put you in a more positive state of mind, something that can help you manage your pain better. In addition, sitting in the hot water and being massaged by the tub’s jets can be a huge help in relieving pain. If you’re someone who struggles with chronic pain and is looking for relief, then a hot tub could be the perfect solution. 

BETTER SLEEP…

As mentioned before, using a hot tub can be a great way to relax and relieve some stress. One way that this can manifest itself is through better sleep. If you use the hot tub at night before you go to bed, you’ll find yourself much more relaxed and carefree. Being relaxed at night, can make falling and staying asleep much easier for you. Many Americans struggle with anxiety or some other sleep problem, leading people to get less than the desired amount of sleep. Doing so can create a vicious cycle, as sleep deprivation can make you feel more stressed and irritated, further adding to your problems. Thankfully, a hot tub can break that cycle, allowing you to relax and get into a calmed mindset before you go to sleep. As a result, you can sleep peacefully and easily, improving your health and your mood for the future. 

MOBILITY…

It’s no secret that in our old age our bodies begin to deteriorate and become limited in their mobility. If you’re old enough to own your own home, then you’ve likely already experienced some of the negative side effects that come with ageing. Getting around the home may be slightly more difficult, and you might find physical tasks that used to be easy much more difficult. Thankfully using a hot tub can actually be a huge help with your mobility and range of motion. Studies have shown that frequently using a hot tub can help relieve joint inflammation and muscle stiffness, something that can be a huge help in improving your mobility. If ageing has made it more difficult to move around, then frequently using a hot tub can be a great way to combat it. 

GINGER AS A FORM OF MUSCLE PAIN RELIEF…

Ginger has been used in traditional Indian Ayurvedic medicine for intestinal discomfort and flatulence, as well as for inflammatory conditions, such as arthritis and rheumatism.

Ayurveda still forms the basis of much medical practice today in India, Sri Lanka and Pakistan, where orthodox Doctors work alongside Ayurvedic physicians.


Some well known herbal agents for pain are skullcap, valerian, tumeric, poppy, willow bark, St. John’s wort, angelica, motherwart, black cohosh, wild yam, lavender, cayenne, kava kava and rose. Essential oils of pine, lavender, peppermint, cinnamon, rose, clove, frankincense, rosemary, ginger, juniper and birch are all well documented analgesic agents.


Essential oils can be used to rub into painful, swollen joints or the herbs can be taken as a tincture or in tablet form and can help quieten the nervous system, and relax muscles, sooth pain and can have an anti inflammatory effect.In China, herbalists use bupleurum, ginseng and licorice to reduce and relieve pain resulting from inflammation and cat’s claw, a herb grown in South America has been found to reduce inflammation and researchers have discovered that it contains anti-arthritic compounds.


Don’t let people deter you from trying some herbal medicines, oils or tinctures. You just have to read all about it before you buy it and buy from a reputable dealer and if you are still not sure then check with your Doctor as some may clash with your regular prescription drugs.

On the NHS website they wrote –

“Ginger kills pain”, reported the Daily Express . It said that a study has found that “muscle pain from sport or gardening can be eased by eating ginger”.

This study compared the effect of capsules of raw or heat-treated ginger to a “dummy” capsule on muscle pain. Students were asked to take the capsules for 11 days, and carry out strenuous arm exercises on the eighth day. They then rated their muscle pain over the next three days. The ginger group rated their pain as slightly less than the placebo group in the 24 hours after the exercise.

Although the study used a good design and both researchers and participants were blinded, the study was relatively small (78 participants). This theory should ideally be tested in further, larger studies. It is also not possible to determine from this study whether ginger would have any effects on other kinds of pain or more intense exercise-related muscle pain.

Where did the story come from?

The study was carried out by researchers from Georgia College and State University and the University of Georgia. It was funded by the McCormick Science Institute (MSI), an independent organisation that supports research into the health effects of culinary herbs and spices. MSI receives funding from McCormick & Company, Inc., a manufacturer of culinary herbs and spices. The study was published in the peer-reviewed Journal of Pain.

The study was covered in the Daily Express and Daily Mail , who reported the story relatively accurately. You can read more on what kind of research this was, what the research involved and it’s conclusion on the NHS website.

4 OF THE BEST EXERCISES TO DO FOR A BAD BACK…

The best way to prevent lower back pain is to exercise regularly and engage in strength training so that your core and back muscles are strong. A regular stretching program to keep you limber will help too.
However, if you already have back pain, contrary to popular belief, you still can and should start exercising to strengthen your body. You just need to take it slower and easier… but you need to exercise.


In most cases, it’s the lower back that will hurt. So, the muscles that you want to strengthen will be your glutes, hip adductors, core, abs and back muscles. The goal here will be to challenge them gradually so that they get stronger over time. You can’t just bang out a set of deadlifts with heavy poundage and expect to get away with it.


You’ll need to take it slow so that you don’t aggravate your condition. In this article, you’ll be given a few exercises that are very beneficial for back pain sufferers. Most are low impact and will not aggravate your condition.


It’s also essential to get approval from your doctor before engaging in any exercise routine when you’re suffering from a bad back.

  1. Planks
    There are many different types of planks such as forearm planks, side planks, knee planks, reverse planks and many more. Have a variety of them in your training so that you target different muscles. These planks will strengthen your core… and a strong core is the first step to preventing back pain, or reducing it.
  2. Bridging
    This is one of the best back exercises out there, and yet it’s often neglected. Lie on your back and bend your knees so that your feet form a right angle. Now push off your heels and raise your hips off the ground. Your knees, hips and shoulders should be aligned and form a straight line. Lower your hips and repeat again. Do this for 10 to 12 reps.
  3. Deadlifts
    This is one of the cornerstones of weight lifting. It requires good technique and proper form. You can learn how to do it from a trainer at the gym or by watching videos online. Always remember not to use too much weight, and not to jerk. Slow, controlled reps is what you’re aiming for. The weight you use should allow you to do about 10 to 12 reps. If all you can lift is a bar with no weights, then that will do.
    You’re not trying to build mass or become a bodybuilder. The goal is just to strengthen your back so that you’re not in pain. You can progress over time.
  4. Bird dog
    Similar to the plank, and challenging too. There is minimal impact. Get into a kneeling position with your palm on the floor. Now, straighten your right leg outwards and above the ground, while you straighten your left arm outwards too.
    Now you’ll just be balancing on your left knee and right arm. Hold the position for about 5 to 10 seconds… or longer if possible. Now repeat on the other side.
    If you do these four exercises regularly, you’ll strengthen your back and core, which in turn will make you less susceptible to back pain. Do note that you should have a day or two of rest after training. Approach your training with a slow and steady mindset, and you’ll be stronger in a month or two.

There are lots of websites and YouTube videos on all of the above exercises if you find it easier to watch how to do them. Little steps is the perfect way to start these and only after you have spoken to your GP.