DO YOU GET THAT FEELING IN YOUR BONES WHEN IT STARTS TO RAIN?…

You hear many people say I can feel it in my bones when it starts to rain, well according to Harvard Medical School, in an article from Science Daily, they found no relationship between rainfall and joint or back pain.

The notion that certain symptoms and weather go hand in hand has persisted since antiquity. Hippocrates, writing in On Airs, Waters, and Places, exhorted those who wish to understand medicine to look at the changing seasons of the year and study the prevailing winds to see how the weather they bring affects health. The belief has endured over the centuries and well into the present, likely fueled by a combination of folklore and small studies that have repeatedly yielded mixed results.

The newly published analysis led by Anupam Jena of Harvard Medical School’s Department of Health Care Policy said “No matter how we looked at the data, we didn’t see any correlation between rainfall and physician visits for joint pain or back pain,” said Jena, who is the Ruth L. Newhouse Associate Professor of Health Care Policy at Harvard Medical School and an internist at Massachusetts General Hospital. “The bottom line is: Painful joints and sore backs may very well be unreliable forecasters.”

The human brain is good at finding patterns, Jena noted, and these beliefs are often self-fulfilling. If you expect your knee to hurt when it rains and it doesn’t, you forget about it, he said, but if it hurts and you blame it on the rain, it tends to stick in your mind.

“As physicians, we should be sensitive to the things our patients are telling us. Pain is pain, with or without rain,” Jena said. “But it’s important to know that, at the clinical level, joint pain does not appear to ebb and flow with the weather.”

Well, I don’t know about some of my readers but I have to totally disagree. I am most definitely worse with certain weather conditions and better in other type of weather conditions. I find my body has to adjust to the change of seasons and if I go abroad for a holiday the same applies so it’s not just a UK thing.

I would love to hear what your thoughts are on rain and pain ?

Source : Harvard Medical School and Science Daily

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HOW A HYGGE LIFESTYLE CAN HELP PEOPLE IN CHRONIC PAIN …

If your knew to the latest trend in a Hygge Lifestyle then it’s easy to explain.

Hygge, is a Danish and Norwegian word for a mood of coziness and comfortable conviviality with feelings of wellness and contentment. As a cultural category with its sets of associated practices hygge has more or less the same meanings in Danish and Norwegian, but the notion is more central in Denmark than Norway. Wikipedia

Nearly every paper that I pick up today has at least one article on HYGGE and how it is influencing people all over the world to enjoy this type of lifestyle.

Being happy and content with your life is how the Danish lead their everyday life which isn’t really practised in Britain, and yet most of us would love to lead this way of life.

So, how can you enjoy a Hygge lifestyle? Well, it all starts off with what you have around you. Are you surrounded by clutter, is your room full of bits and pieces that you keep meaning to go through? If so then start by going through all your clutter one room at a time. Don’t try and clear every room straight away as you will probably give up immediately. Work on one room at a time and then you will see how wonderful you feel with the decluttered regime.

Now, look at your colours. What colours are in your room, could it do with a little more light or a complete make-over. First things first, look at what is letting the light into your room. What sort of curtains or blinds do you have up? What sort of lighting have you?

These simple steps of changing a rooms curtains/blinds and lighting could completely alter the theme of your room. So much so that you might not need to give it a complete make-over you may be quite happy with the paint colour or decide to just change one wall to a lighter colour. If you look at any book or website on Hygge you will immediately see how the right colours and lights can change a room completely.

Finish the room with the right accessories. It’s amazing how accessories even down to the right plants can completely change the look of your room.

Some of my favourite websites with Hygge living ideas are Pinterest, Houzz and Hyggestyle.

Other ways to enjoy a Hygge way of living and help your pain is to think about your favourite movie or tv show and watch it again. It you have a favourite book that made you feel good then read it again. Sometimes just curling up with a good book can make you feel better.

Eating healthy food can fill you with anti-inflammatory benefits but every now and then we crave a plate of comfort food or a warm cup of tea. If this doesn’t become a habit then treat yourself to something special.

While enjoying re-watching your favourite movie or reading your favourite book while enjoying some comfort food make sure you are sitting comfortably in light weight clothes and cozy socks and wrap yourself in a soft blanket the Hygge way. Turn your laptop onto silent and if you have a crock pot fill it with something nice to enjoy for dinner later. It makes me feel relaxed just writing this down.

SUFFERING FROM SAD AND LACK OF ENERGY DURING THE WINTER MONTHS….

We all lack energy from time to time but if it doesn’t improve then you should see your GP.

There are a number of conditions that can leave you feeling lethargic. Iron levels are one of the first things that can affect energy levels and cause tiredness.

An under-active thyroid is another cause of tiredness and the falling hormone levels that occur at the menopause.

Fatigue can also be a sign of diabetes.

If you are suffering from SAD (Seasonal Effective Disorder) this can also cause fatigue.

As well as the above, some medications can also cause lethargy, including beta blockers, some antihistamines, codeine-based painkillers and also some antidepressants. Also some sleeping tablets may help to get you through the night, some can cause daytime fatigue.

Of course, anxiety, stress and depression are also triggers for sapping energy levels. The best course of action is to go and visit your GP.

At this time of year one in eight of us can suffer from winter blues and one in 50 of us suffer from SAD through lack of sunlight.

Symptoms of SAD include fatigue and depression.

Its the sunlight that tells your brain to produce serotonin, which is needed to boost our mood and energy. Lack of it as autumn turns to winter causes an increase in the production of melatonin (which makes us sleepy) and a reduction in serotonin is what can cause depression.

One of the most obvious ways to treat SAD is to get outside in the daylight for at least 20 minutes a day but you can also invest in a light box. Light therapy is the most effective way of decreasing the symptoms. Also it is believed that eating foods rich in an amino acid called tryptophan increases the amount of serotonin in the brain.

Also they say that Australian research found that taking vitamin D supplements for only five days in late winter improved the mood of people with SAD. It can also prevent osteoporosis, support immunity and regulate weight. Of course the best way to get Vitamin D is through the effects of sunlight on bare skin. Amazingly they say that Vitamin D lasts for 60 days in the body so if you’ve been away for your annual holiday in the summer, it will mean your levels should be fine until November.

Other sources of Vitamin D can be found in oily fish and eggs, cheese and poultry.

Research also suggests that eating carb-rich foods helps the brain take up tryptophan. You can also find supplements and The Food Agency recommends taking 10mcg a day.

8 NATURAL REMEDIES TO HELP WITH FATIGUE…

1. If you are suffering from a case of afternoon slumps then eat or smell peppermint. It is known to wake up and help decrease fatigue. In fact research at the University of Northumbria found that in a test involving word recall, peppermint-gum chewer’s scores were up to 36% higher than non-chewers.

2. They also say that Siberian Ginseng which has been around for centuries is known for its anti-fatigue qualities. It acts like a tonic, which can then increase the body’s vital energy. Anyone taking antidepressants, diabetes, or blood clotting medication should consult their physician first.

3.Vitamin B12 is also popular and it is naturally found in fish, dairy produce, organ meats, beef, pork and is water soluble.Vitamin B12 contributes to normal energy yielding metabolism, functioning of the nervous system, homocysteine metabolism, psychological function, red blood cell formation and function of the immune system. You can also buy it in tablet form from Holland and Barrett and other good chemists.

4.Graded Exercise Therapy. Studies have repeatedly shown that graded exercise therapy helps those with CFS.

5. Sleep of course is a natural remedy for fatigue.. People with CFS often have broken or disordered sleep and may even suffer from insomnia. Going to bed and getting up in the morning at the same time every day. Avoiding naps in the day (although I cannot manage without mine) and taking time to relax before you go to bed.

6. Licorice root, in standardized form, is a commonly used natural remedy for chronic fatigue. This herb, which helps regulate normal system function and allows your body to better cope with stress, has been used for thousands of years in Ayurvedic and Chinese medicine. To help restore cortisol levels, look for standardized licorice root in extract or pill form. Speak to your physician if you take blood thinners, potassium, or blood pressure medications as interactions can occur.

7. The NHS add that a good way to keep up your energy through the day is to eat regular meals and healthy snacks every 3 to 4 hours, rather than a large meal less often.

8. Cut out caffeine, the NHS say try to stay off caffeine completely for a month to see if you feel less tired without it.