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IT’S SLEEP SUNDAY – LET’S TALK ABOUT TIREDNESS & HOW TO OVERCOME IT…

Your energy and tiredness can actually be lifted in different ways. If your struggling just to put one foot in front of the other then you could try some tricks of the trade to help pick you up.

Studies have proved that an early morning workout boosts your metabolism more than at any other time. First thing for me is by far the worst time as I am always as stiff as a board but once I’ve had my medication, a hot shower and got moving I soon feel more comfortable but I might start going for my morning walk before breakfast to try this metabolism lift.

They also say that if you drop a jasmine essential oil on your wrist after showering it will increase brain waves and instantly make you more alert.

Wearing bright colours they say will give you an instant energy boost.

And, apparently when you are doing computer work you blink a lot less which can then leas to you feeling more tired. In the Natural Health Magazine they said that the University of Texas suggest a 20-20-20-20 strategy : blinking 20 times, looking away for 20 seconds and focusing on an object 20 feet away, every 20 minutes !!!!!

Include nuts in your lunch as they are high in healthy unsaturated fats and protein, and packed with key vitamins and minerals, nuts are a great source of energy.

Of course we all know that taking a nap for around 45 minutes can produce a five-fold improvement in your memory and alertness and is something I can definitely verify is so true. If I miss my 44 mins – 1 hr afternoon nap I just cannot function the same and, my pain seems much worse.

I am lucky enough to be surrounded by beautiful countryside, so I can regularly walk among nature. Researchers at the University of Rochester have found that being surrounded by nature for just 20 minutes a day makes people feel more invigorated.

Finally, at the end of your day, try this bedtime power walk. Walk as slowly as you can around your bedroom keeping your body in constant motion. Start with 30 seconds and then work your way up to 5 minutes. They say this low level exercise will reduce stress hormones dramatically.

#backpainblog, #BACKPAINBLOGUK, #control my pain, #fibromyalgia, #fibromyallgia symptoms, #health, #pain, #Pain Awareness Month, #PainAwarenessMonth, CHRONIC PAIN, FIBROMYALGIA, HEALTH

SEPTEMBER – CHRONIC PAIN AWARENESS MONTH…

Pain Concern write that this month is dedicated to raising public awareness and understanding of pain. Many organisations around the world contribute, including the U.S. Pain Foundation, the International Pain Foundation and the American Massage Therapy Association (AMTA).

During September, the U.S. Pain Foundation will be sharing 30 stories of people living with pain over 30 days, while the AMTA has posted resources to inform people of the role of massage therapy in pain management strategies. Pain Concern, they will be posting regularly on social media.

Everyone can play a part during this month by using the hashtag #PainAwarenessMonth.

You can also get involved by ‘liking’/‘following’ Pain Concern on Facebook and Twitter to stay up to date and share the cause.

Links:

When people say what is chronic pain? You can only describe Chronic pain as different to acute pain. Your body keeps hurting weeks, months, or even years after the injury. Doctors often define chronic pain as any pain that lasts for 3 to 6 months or more. Chronic pain can have real effects on your day-to-day life and your mental health.

Curable Health explain that everyday stressors have more of an impact on the body than most of us realize. Once stressors are identified, the brain begins to put the body into a state of fight or flight, causing real, physical effects in the body.

Over time, the brain and central nervous system learn to continue to put the body into a painful state, which repeats the pain cycle. The Curable team pulled resources from modern neuroscience to visually depict the stress-related chronic pain cycle. While neuroscientists are still working to understand all the details of this cycle, this visual can help you grasp the concept on a deeper level.