FIBROMYALGIA AND STEM CELL TREATMENT…

With stem cell therapy being used for a number of medical condition it was no surprise to stroll across a website that said they are now using it to treat Fibromyalgia.

Apparently the cell searches out and in fact detects and then attempts to repair any damage or deficiency discovered, as well as releases growth factors, which stimulate the body’s own repair mechanisms.

‘A medical procedure whereby Human Fetal Stem Cells are transplanted into a Fibromyalgia patient These cellular building blocks are usually administered intravenously and subcutaneously (under the skin) It is a painless procedure, which takes place in approximately one hour, and has no known negative side effects.’

They say that ‘significant positive change are seen between three to six months post treatment, but can occur in as little as weeks or even days after receiving treatment’.

They can take the structure and function of existing cells. For example, if doctors introduce them to the muscle tissue, those cells also become muscle tissues.

Stem Cell Research says that Stem Cell For fibromyalgia patients, could mean stimulating the body’s natural healing process. They can reduce the dependency on medications. They can also deal with the root cause by developing new muscle tissues. In the process, they can reduce or eliminate pain.

To treat a condition with stem cells is also simple. A patient visits a stem cell therapy doctor. The doctor performs the necessary evaluation and then harvests the existing stem cells. Once ready, the physician injects these stem cells into the painful areas.

There are a number of different types of stem cell treatments as shown in this infographic from Stem Cell Research.

Advertisements

6 WAYS TO CREATE CALM IN YOUR BODY…

6 ways to create calm in your body will help you sleep and feel better from the inside.

  • Your jaw can carry stress which then radiates to your head and neck. Some people even grind their teeth.  Loosen that tension by opening your mouth wide for half a minute, and breath naturally through your nose, then allow your mouth to gently close.
  • Download an app which has guided meditation like Headspace or Buddhify which give you a helping hand when you are feeling overwhelmed.
  • Create your own mantra, your personal mantra should be something to inspire you and motivate you. If you can’t think of one for yourself, there are lots to choose from online.
  • Relax your face by turning your head to gently look over one shoulder and then the other shoulder then gently tilt your head back just for a few seconds.
  • Listen to a beautiful piece of music, as studies have shown that slow music with a 10-second repetitive cycle can be very relaxing. They say it syncs with your blood pressure rhythm.
  • Go for a walk. It’s easy to stay inside and not bother but walking can boost circulation and leaves you feeling more relaxed. It also helps you to sleep better.

13 INTERESTING FACTS ABOUT BACK PAIN…

Here are thirteen facts about back pain that you may not know.

Back pain

1. Back pain costs the NHS approximately £12.3 billion per year on back pain related costs, with £1.6 billion spent on treatments.

2. Back pain is one of the most common reasons for missed work. In fact, it is the second most common reason for visits to your GP.

3. Most back pain cases are mechanical and non-organic which basically means it’s NOT caused by a serious condition, but rather from poor posture and poor use of your body.

4. Low back pain is the second most reason to visit to your GP.

5. Back pain is the most frequent cause of limited activity in people younger than 45 years old.

6. Experts estimate that as many as 80% of the population will experience back pain at some point in their lives. 30% of those will have recurring problems.

7. Most back pain goes away on its own, whether or not you treat it with medication or other therapies.

8. According to the Office for National Statistics, almost 31million work days were lost in the UK in 2016 due to musculoskeletal problems and back pain. 

Back pain

9. Bed rest is NOT helpful for the back pain.

10. Exercise is good and safe for back pain. 

11.  Maintaining a healthy weight will help prevent back pain. 

12. Surgery is rarely needed for back pain

13. Your back is stronger than you think.

 

TREATING ACUTE PAIN BEFORE IT TURNS INTO CHRONIC PAIN…

Although acute back pain can be frustrating to live with, they say that you should try to remain as positive as possible. Research has shown that people with a positive mental attitude tend to have quicker recovery times and are much less likely to progress from acute to chronic back pain.

For acute back pain, they say you should remain as active as possible. If you find it too painful to return to your normal daily activities immediately, pace yourself and aim to do a little more each day.

Going back to work can help you to return to a normal pattern of activity, and it can often distract you from your symptoms of pain so don’t wait until all the pain has gone before you go back.

People with back pain find that using either hot or cold compression packs helps to reduce pain. Personally, I prefer heat rather than ice.

Placing a small firm cushion beneath your knees when you are sleeping on your side, or using several firm pillows to prop up your knees when lying on your back, may also help to ease your symptoms.

If the symptoms persist then go and see your GP or a professional chiropractor or physiotherapist.

MYOFASCIAL PAIN -v- DISC PAIN…

As most of my readers know I suffer from chronic back pain after four previous spinal fusion surgeries only alleviated the pain for a matter of years before it came back.

Nowadays spinal fusion is not used as the first choice for prolapsed discs with pain management being the first treatment and only if nerves are compressed is it used as another option.

The problem with spinal fusion especially if you have more than one surgery is the pressure it puts on the disc below and above your fusion.

Another condition which you can also suffer from after any type of surgery is Myofascial Pain Syndrome which is a chronic painful muscle disorder and is common if you have experienced a muscle injury. Over time these myofascial restrictions can lead to poor biomechanics, altered structural alignment, compromised blood supply and pain. Other causes of myofascial pain are injuries to an intervertebral disc, general fatigue, repetitive motions, and some medical conditions.

It is characterised by the myofascial trigger points and the symptoms include persistent or worsening pain, deep and aching muscle pain, tender knots located in the muscles and pain after exercise or sporting activity.

Myofascial Pain Syndrome (MPS) is the name given to pain caused by trigger points and fascia (connective tissue) adhesions in the body, usually in muscle tissue, and inflammation in the body’s soft tissues.

Myo = muscle
Fascia = the main connective tissue in the body
Release = to let go, ease pressure

Treatments include anti-inflammatory medication, pain killers, physical therapy, stretching, massage therapy and trigger point injections.

A trigger point injection is either a cortisone injection or dry needling. Pain relief is quick and helps in continuing physical therapy. Trigger point injections can also be used for people suffering from degenerative disc disease.

Understanding the cause of your pain is an important step to finding an effective solution. It may involve a series of sessions and an at home program to keep the area strong.

Disc pain can come from a disc bulge or prolapse but you can also get myofascial pain which could be treated conservatively instead of surgery. Fibromyalgia patients can also suffer from myofascial pain. According to history, Sir William Gowers introduced the term fibrositis for a common, but idiopathic, localized form of muscular rheumatism that is now recognised as myofascial pain syndrome in 1904. And, despite the intervening years, it still constitutes the largest group of unrecognised and undertreated acute and chronic pain problems. Some people (like myself) have also been told they could have Fibromyalgia, previously named ‘fibrositis’.

My neck and arm pain have been giving me a lot of problems since last summer and after extensive tests, MRI’s, ct scans and more it was decided that a nerve block would help with the pain. There is never any guarantee with any injection but they hope to give the patient a few months of pain relief.

Nerve block injections into your neck for a disc bulge can be quite dangerous as they are quite tricky to do and they go through the front of your neck. I had this injection about six weeks ago. It’s not a very nice injection (if any are) but I knew the pain consultant had hit the spot and soon felt total relief. Unfortunately, it was short lived and only gave me pain relief for a few weeks. Not all the pain has come back but most of it as did the pins and needles.

I then had another appointment at the pain clinic and after looking at my MRI’s etc I was given a quick check where my pain consultant felt that the pain I now have could well be myofascial and not from the bulging disc so he has booked me in for a series of steroid injections in my shoulders.

I guess with any spinal pain after you have had all the tests it’s then worth trying alternative treatments well before you resort to surgery which is something I have always said I would avoid having.