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NATIONAL CARERS WEEK 7th-13th JUNE, 21…

National Carers Week takes place this year from 7th-13th June and with over a year of a pandemic to deal with there could not be a more appropriate time to raise awareness of carers.

Did you know that carers have lost, on average, 25 hours of support a month they previously had from services or family and friends before the pandemic and our recommendations as to what should be done to give carers the breaks they desperately need.

According to the Carers Week website fewer than one in five (14%) exhausted unpaid carers are confident that the support they receive with caring will continue following the COVID-19 pandemic.

After an extraordinarily challenging year providing many more hours of care for loved ones during the pandemic – coping with reduced support from health and care services as well as limited help from family and friends – unpaid carers are seriously worried about the support they will have to help them care in the future.

Research released for Carers Week has found that carers lost, on average, 25 hours of support a month they previously had from services or family and friends before the pandemic.

72% of carers have not had any breaks from their caring role at all. Of those who got a break, a third (33%) used the time to complete practical tasks or housework, and a quarter (26%) to attend their own medical appointments.

Three quarters (74%) reported being exhausted as a result of caring during the pandemic, and more than a third (35%) said they feel unable to manage their unpaid caring role.

The six charities supporting Carers Week – Carers UK, Age UK, Carers Trust, Motor Neurone Disease Association, Oxfam GB and Rethink Mental Illness – are calling on the UK Government to provide £1.2 billion funding for unpaid carers’ breaks, so that those providing upwards of 50 hours of care are able to take time off for their own health and wellbeing.

On behalf of Carers Week charities Helen Walker, Chief Executive of Carers UK, said:

Carers have sacrificed their physical and mental health caring for loved ones over the course of this pandemic. They are exhausted having cared around the clock, and do not know how they can continue without a break.

“Many are looking to support services to be able to take that time for themselves but are desperately worried that they will not continue in the future.

“Without the right support, the stress and challenges of the last year could lead to far more carers breaking down. It is essential that the Government ensures that carers can take breaks and that those providing upwards of 50 hours of care each week get a funded break.

“Unpaid carers need hope and support in the future and they must be at the heart of the Government’s plans for social care reform.”

Carers Week is an annual campaign to raise awareness of caring, highlight the challenges unpaid carers face and recognise the contribution they make to families and communities throughout the UK. It also helps people who don’t think of themselves as having caring responsibilities to identify as carers and access much-needed support.

This year we are coming together to Make Caring Visible and Valued.

The campaign is brought to life by thousands of individuals and organisations who come together to provide support for carers, run activities, highlight the vital role carers play in our communities and draw attention to just how important caring is.

This year, carers across the country are continuing to face new challenges as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Many people are taking on more caring responsibilities for their relatives and friends who are disabled, ill or older and who need support.

They need to be recognised for the difficulties they are experiencing, respected for all they are doing, and provided with information, support and understanding. So during Carers Week, we’re coming together to help Make Caring Visible and Valued.

There are 6.5 million people in the UK who are carers. They are looking after a family member or friend who has a disability, mental or physical illness or who needs extra help as they grow older. Caring’s impact on all aspects of life from relationships and health to finances and work can be significant, and carers are facing even more difficult circumstances this year. Whilst many feel that caring is one of the most important things they do, its challenges should not be underestimated. Caring without the right information and support can be tough.  It is vitally important that we recognise the contribution carers make to their families and local communities, workplaces and society, and that they get the support they need.

Head down to the Carers Week website for lots for information and how you can make a difference.

Source : Carers Week

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WALKING AND THE BRITISH OBSESSION WITH THE WEATHER…

A few interesting facts about the British obsession with the weather.

Did you know that a survey has shown that the British spend nearly six months just ‘talking’ about the weather. Apparently we are obsessed with the English weather. It’s one of the most common ways to start a conversation, which check-out staff at supermarkets have to listen to time and time again.


We spend almost five times a day talking about it and spend longer discussing it than we do discussing sport or work!!


Women talk about it more than chatting about their men, love lives and gossip and twitter gets around 500,000+ tweets a week about it.


Older people apparently have three times as many conversations about it and still believe in old wives tales, such as , cows sitting down (rain comes) and red sky at night (shepherds delight). Even Twitter gets over 500,000 ‘tweets’ about it.

These findings prove that we are a nation who is totally obsessed with the weather and how we can go from one season to another in one day.


But, no matter what the weather walking or cycling in it, are the two most popular ways at the moment to keep fit. With watches and phones that can count our steps for us some of us become obsessed with trying to get in our daily 10,000 steps. Even health companies have got on board who will reward you if you keep up with your steps.

For me personally, I do have a watch that counts my steps and I do check it regularly to see how I am getting on and if I do not manage to get out for a walk due to the weather !! (I’m not one to walk in the rain) then I do try to do a few more steps up and down my stairs but 10,000 is out of my league. My back just doesn’t like me to do more than 7,000 but I feel the benefit of that so it’s better than nothing.

The NHS point out that walking is simple, free and one of the easiest ways to get more active, lose weight and become healthier.

Sometimes overlooked as a form of exercise, walking briskly can help you build stamina, burn excess calories and make your heart healthier.

You do not have to walk for hours. A brisk 10-minute daily walk has lots of health benefits and counts towards your recommended 150 minutes of weekly exercise.

The British Heart Foundation has some walking plans you can follow and other programs available online are Weight Watchers, or you could sign up and walk for your favourite charity. I am sure Captain Tom has inspired many people to do,just that.

Walk for Water have set up challenges for March for people to walk 4, 8 or 12 kilometres for their charity. Walk where you can, when you can, and raise funds to help make clean water normal for everyone, everywhere.

Walk for the millions of women and children who walk distances like this every day to get the water they need to survive.

All distances reflect a walk that women and girls around the world have to take each day to reach water. Women and girls like Tiyamike, Majory and Felisberta.

When you Walk for Water, you’re helping to give Tiyamike, Majory, Felisberta and others across the world the power to change their own lives, forever.

Lots of other charities have walks you can sign up for including Memory Walk, for Alzheimer’s, British Heart Foundation, Help the Heroes and lots more to choose from online.