COPING DURING THE COVID-19 LOCKDOWN AND TRYING TO DEAL WITH IT WHILE IN PAIN…

This week has been a week where I seem to have struggled with whatever I have done. We all have them and I’m hoping next week will be much better.

I feel guilty in that I think I have brought some of my pain on myself by doing more than I normally would do during the COVID-19 lockdown. But, I’m sure I’m not alone and a few of us have ‘had a go’ at something over the last eight weeks.

Mine was my little shed in the garden which I have sat and looked at for the last twelve months and decided a make over with lots of help from the other half could be manageable.

The end product is just what I wanted but being a bit of a perfectionist at heart has meant more work for me. The edges and finishing touches were done by me which ended up taking longer than painting the shed. It’s not that I was holding anything heavy but it’s the position you get into to achieve what you want. We adapted a stool for me for lower areas and a big cushion for anything lower down but it just took time.

I’ve rested up a few days but it seems to have really stirred up pins and needles and pain down my arm, in fact it’s affected my hand so badly that I’ve dropped a few things. Now I know I’ve not done any permanent harm but I have obviously provoked a reaction. Injuries happen, it’s a part of normal life.

Because I write my blog so regularly I somehow feel expectations are high and I feel almost guilty if I don’t write my regular post. There are moments in the lives of many people when they are not even sure what brought the pain into their life, only that it is agonizingly there.

Pharmi Web wrote that the University of East Anglia researchers are launching a new study to see how Covid-19 and lockdown are affecting people with bone, joint and muscle pain.

Their previous research has revealed the challenges and poor health outcomes caused by social isolation and loneliness for people with conditions like osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, lower back pain, osteoporosis and fibromyalgia. The study will be of great interest to us all.

The daily sun dose we are having is beautiful and I am sure the last eight weeks would have felt like eight months without it but I am definitely ready to see my family for real as soon as I can.

4 DRUGS THAT MIGHT BE EFFECTIVE AS A FIBROMYALGIA TREATMENT…

According to a recent article in Pro Health there are four drugs that might be effective as a Fibromyalgia treatment. Although these four drugs are not knew ones they could still help with Fibromyalgia. These drugs will likely never be the subject of big clinical trials because there’s little profit to be made given their age. However, that doesn’t mean they aren’t effective.

1. Ketamine

A growing number of pain clinics are now offering ketamine infusions for chronic conditions like fibromyalgia, but do they actually work? Early research suggests they may – at least temporarily.

In a small Swedish study, 11 fibromyalgia patients were randomly selected to receive either a low-dose ketamine infusion or a placebo infusion. Eight of those patients experienced at least 50% less pain using ketamine.

Web MD say Ketamine it could also be one of the biggest breakthroughs in treating severe depression in years.

How can one drug hold such promise and peril? The answer lies in how it affects your brain.

Ketamine works like a flash mob, temporarily taking over a certain chemical “receptor.” In some cases and with expert medical care, that can be a good thing. But cross that line, and it’s big trouble.

2. Memantime

Sometimes the brain fog caused by fibromyalgia literally can feel like early-stage dementia so it isn’t surprising that an Alzheimer’s drug might be helpful in treating fibro.

Memantine is frequently used for moderate-to-severe Alzheimer’s disease, but two small Spanish studies have shown it may benefit those with fibromyalgia, too. In 2014, researchers from the University of Zarogoza reported memantine significantly reduced fibromyalgia pain when administered to 63 patients at a dosage of 20 mg per day.

3. Metformin

The subgroup of patients who had undergone pharmacological treatment of [insulin resistance] with metformin, in combination with the [standard treatment], experienced a dramatic decrease in pain scores,” reads the study. “Response to metformin plus [standard treatment] was followed by complete resolution of pain in eight of 16 patients who had been treated with metformin, a degree of improvement never observed before in such a large proportion of fibromyalgia patients subjected to any available treatment.

4. Naltrexone ( low dose) –

Low-dose naltrexone (LDN) is the dark horse of the fibromyalgia community. Very few patients and doctors know about it, and yet I frequently hear from persons with fibromyalgia who say LDN has changed their lives for the better.

An opioid receptor antagonist, naltrexone has been used to treat alcohol and drug dependence since the 1980s at full doses of 50 mg or higher.

 

MAY IS #FIBROMYALGIA AWARENESS MONTH…

 

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May is Fibromyalgia Awareness Month and ProHealth say, ‘Help us raise awareness and dispel the myths about this disease’. Write your story of Fibromyalgia on their site Fibromyalgia Awareness Healing Story Meaning originally written by Rebuilding Wellness. 

Zazzle an American site has a number of Fibromyalgia Awareness Gifts from t. shirts to key rings.  T. shirts are also available from Cafe Press UK. Another brilliant site for anything Fibro related is Fibro Blogger a Directory of People who Blog about Fibromyalgia. So, if you blog about people join this amazing directory of Fibro Bloggers.

There is also a Facebook Site which is promoting May 12th as ‘International ME/CFS/& FM Awareness Day’ so pop over and give them a tick or a donation to help raise awareness of these diseases.

SIX FACTS ABOUT FIBROMYALGIA…

  1. It is a real disorder with measurable biological abnormalities.
  2. There is a specific set of diagnostic criteria developed by the American College of Rheumatology to be used for diagnosing Fibromyalgia.
  3. It affects men, women, and children of all ages.
  4. Several studies have revealed markers of inflammation in Fibromyalgia.
  5. Exercise, when done properly, can help to reduce Fibromyalgia symptoms.
  6. Although there is no cure for Fibromyalgia, it can be managed with the right combination of treatments and therapies.

Infographic 25 invisible symptoms of fibromyalgia

POLYMYALGIA -V- FIBROMYALGIA – OR COULD YOU HAVE BOTH?…

Both polymyalgia and fibromyalgia may cause depression related to living with a painful chronic condition. According to the Mayo Clinic, older adults, usually over age 65, are more likely to be diagnosed with polymyalgia rheumatica. It’s rare in people under age 50, but anyone can get #fibromyalgia at any age. But it tends to be more common in women than in men.

It is possible for a person to have both polymyalgia and fibromyalgia. Polymyalgia rheumatica is an inflammatory form of arthritis,   that’s believed to be autoimmune, meaning that the body is attacking its own healthy tissues because it mistakes them for infectious agents such as viruses or bacteria. Fibromyalgia does not show traditional signs of inflammation, though some recent research from 2017 suggests it may also involve inflammation.

Blood tests can usually diagnose polymyalgia, however, no single test can determine if a person has fibromyalgia, instead a physical exam that looks for specific tender points may be used. A doctor may also take blood samples to rule out inflammatory conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis. 

Because of their surface similarities, it’s possible for polymgaliga rheumatica to be misdiagnosed as fibromyalgia or vice versa, or for either condition to be overlooked in someone who’s already diagnosed with one of the other.

Very Well Health points out that ‘ these two conditions, however, are very different and require different treatments. Knowing the symptoms of both can help you recognize whether you may have a new or undiagnosed condition that needs to be addressed.’

However, apart from their name and main symptom, fibromyalgia and polymyalgia have little in common. Even the muscle pain might be slightly different — some experts suggest polymyalgia muscle pain doesn’t include the tenderness you may experience with fibromyalgia muscle pain.

Treatment for polymyalgia is prescription corticosteroids, ith medication, you may see a major improvement in your polymyalgia symptoms in just a few days. If after two to three weeks on the medication you don’t get better, it’s likely you don’t have polymyalgia but another condition.

The main difference is that polymyalgia rheumatica is an inflammatory condition, and fibromyalgia is a non-inflammatory condition. Because of this, polymyalgia rheumatica responds to treatment with anti-inflammatory medications. Whereas fibromyalgia is a non-inflammatory condition caused by the nervous system that results in pain and is associated with fatigue, ‘brain fog’ and sleep problems and responds to a different set of medications.

I am a twin and my twin sister was diagnosed with polymyalgia rheumatica, whereas I was diagnosed with fibromyalgia but many years apart,  but we both feel this is also quite strange.

8 FREE OR UNDER £5 GREAT BOOKS ON FIBROMYALGIA…

#Free and under £5 books on #fibromyalgia…

The Pain Within Me: My Battle With Fibromyalgia, by Lawawn Dunbar : £1.50 on Amazon Kindle – Diagnosed with fibromyalgia in 2012, Lawawn suffered from pain for too long, and so decided to give her testimony. ‘The Pain Within Me’ tells her story of an ongoing battle with this disease, in the hope to raise awareness and connect with those who share her struggles.

The Pain Within Me: My Battle with Fibromyalgia by [Lawawn Dunbar]

Fibromyalgia Digest as seen on NBC TV – for a FREE copy of the book “Treating and Beating Fibromyalgia and CFS” – just head to the website and fill in your name and email address.

Upper Cervical Healthcare has a FREE ebook to download on Natural Help for Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Sufferers on their website here. 

Local Los Angeles Doctor writes eBook on a little-known connection between your upper neck, whiplash injuries and Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. In this book, you will learn about a little-known procedure that has been helping Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue patient’s improve with a noninvasive and natural approach.

Your Guide to Treating Fibromyalgia – a FREE download ebook Step by Step – A Personal Approach to Managing Fibromyalgia This ebook is packed with detailed information about the most effective means of treating Fibromyalgia. Experts and Researchers agree that a “Patient Directed” Fibromyalgia management program is the best treatment approach. While dozens of proven effective treatment options are discussed at length, the focus of this book is on the process of putting systems to use in researching, planning, implementing and managing the development of an individualized Fibromyalgia treatment program. Through the key concept of “Intelligent” Trial and Error – this ebook will teach you a more effective means of managing Fibromyalgia on a daily basis. You can find it on their website here. 

Your Guide to Treating Fibromyalgia

Free From Fibromyalgia Book 3 Pain and Exercise by Tricia Duffy £2.14 – The author was diagnosed with severe fibromyalgia in June 2000. Despite being told that she probably would never recover, Tricia is now well and living a full and satisfying life. She has experienced the pain and so can relate to others who suffer from fibromyalgia. Several practical steps are outlined that really do help with the pain. How the muscles are affected and why this causes the pain is explained here. This leads to the reasons why exercise is so vital when looking at overcoming the debilitating symptoms of fibromyalgia, available from Amazon.

Free from Fibromyalgia Book 3 Pain and Exercise by [Tricia Duffy]

Fibromyalgia and Myofascial Pain Syndrome: A practical guide to getting on with your life by Chris Jenner Kindle Edition £3.99 – Written by one of the UK’s leading consultants on pain control, this authoritative, yet easily comprehensible book, delivers a high level of understanding and practical advice to the lay reader. Highly recommended. Manage your Fibromyalgia by becoming an expert patient. There really is life after being diagnosed with fibromyalgia or myofascial pain syndrome, available from Amazon.

Fibromyalgia and Myofascial Pain Syndrome: A practical guide to getting on with your life by [Chris Jenner]

Fibromyalgia: A Guide to Understanding the Journey by Shelley Bolton – £3.29 – This quick read is informative and entertaining, with personal stories and documented research. It doesn’t offer cures and this is intentional. No cures have been found, but what so many of us desperately need is to understand and be understood. That is the purpose of this short, insightful book, available from Amazon.

Fibromyalgia: A Guide to Understanding the Journey by [Shelly Bolton]

But You Don’t Look Sick Fibromyalgia An Invisible Illness by Bette Brown – £3.99 on Kindle from Amazon – For many years Bette Brown has been diagnosed and living with the challenges of fibromyalgia (sometimes referred to as Fibromyalgia Syndrome or FMS). She knows how it affects every corner of your life. She’s had to make several lifestyle changes to ensure she can keep fighting this life-changing illness. As well as her own experience, knowledge and research, she has had access to the personal stories of others who have had the challenge and trauma of living with fibromyalgia and its effect. They have agreed Bette can share these with you. This is a down to earth, easy-to-read book about the debilitating, fluctuating and frequently misunderstood illness fibromyalgia. Ann Livingstone B.A.(Hons) Business Admin Amazon

 

But You Don't Look Sick!: Fibromyalgia an Invisible illness by [Bette Brown]