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ACUPUNCTURE BACK IN THE NEWS AS A SUCCESSFUL TREATMENT FOR FIBROMYLAGIA…

It seems I am constantly writing articles on pain relief using acu-points so it has to be something worth trying if you have not tried it before. I found it beneficial for my shoulders and neck but I haven’t tried it for low back.

I am a true advocate for all treatments using pressure points including acupressure mats, pillow, insoles and lots more and I seem to read an article on a regular basis on how it can help with pain especially for Fibromyalgia.

An article in Very Well Health last week that Acupuncture for fibromyalgia (FM) has become more common over the years, especially since more and more research has shown the benefits of this treatment. One in five people with fibromyalgia seek acupuncture treatment within two years of diagnosis.

It is well known that Fibromyalgia is a difficult condition to treat and many people will have tried everything from different types of drugs, supplements, complimentary and alternative therapies including Acupunture but this particular treatment seems to work well for many.

Using complimentary therapies and alternative therapies for Fibromyalgia seems to be the route most used and if this can mean you can cut right down on your drugs then it is definitely worth a try.

Acupuncture points are located on meridians; however, modern acupuncture may also be performed on myofascial trigger points, which are tight areas of connective tissue that can radiate pain.

Most people—even those with fibromyalgia—report no pain or just a momentary twinge when the needles are inserted and upon needle grasp. During and after treatments, it’s common to feel relaxed.

According to Very Well Health the theory held by Western medicine is that acupuncture stimulates or activates several mechanisms in the body, including the:  

Did you know that 2.3 million acupuncture treatments are carried out each year, traditional acupuncture is one of the most popular complementary therapies practised in the UK today. Yet statistics show that 1 in 5 of us would only consider acupuncture for sleep as a last resort. Almost a quarter of people admit they did not realise acupuncture could benefit… Continue reading

In 2016 I wrote that a UK trial showed patients who received ten acupuncture sessions were far more likely to be pain-free after two years than those who didn’t. An American study saw 60% of back pain sufferers experience a significant improvement after acupuncture. The word “acupuncture” means “needle piercing”. It is a traditional Chinese medical treatment using very fine… Continue reading

The NHS writes that acupuncture is sometimes available on the NHS, most often from GP surgeries or physiotherapists, although access is limited. Most acupuncture patients pay for private treatment. The cost of acupuncture varies widely between practitioners.

If you’re being treated by an acupuncture practitioner for a health condition or are considering having acupuncture, it’s advisable to discuss this with your GP.

#backpainblog, #BACKPAINBLOGUK, #fibro, #fibro-flare, #fibromyalgia, #fibromyallgia symptoms, back pain conditions, Fibrmyalgia Awareness, FIBROMYALGIA

Fibromyalgia and Insomnia

For the last … I don’t know how many weeks, to be honest, I have had insomnia. This is unusual for me – I’m a good sleeper, I have good sleep hygiene…

Fibromyalgia and Insomnia
#backpainblog, #BACKPAINBLOGUK, #fibro-flare, #fibromyalgia, #fibromyallgia symptoms, #health, #lowbackpain, #pain, #Quotes, cooking

BPB ALERT: – FOLLOW UP FROM “TWENTY WAYS TO ENJOY COOKING WITHOUT PAIN”…

Only a day after writing the blog post – “Twenty Ways To Enjoy Cooking Without Pain a blogging friend sent me a link to the BBC on an article entitled “Fibromyalgia and pain: How cooking gave me my life back”

In the article Bryony Hopkins BBC Ouch, wrote that Fibromyalgia sufferer Ian Taverner said “When he turned to his cookbooks while managing fibromyalgia, he found the timings unachievable and the expectation of the photos overwhelming.”

“The pain was so bad I couldn’t hold a knife, I couldn’t stand up to cook, I couldn’t carry anything,” he says. “I almost gave up before I started.” “Ian spent years “existing” until the NHS referred him to the pain management programme at the Bath Centre for Pain Services – the last form of treatment available to him.”

Initially, he took to the kitchen alone, but found he needed the support of his wife and girls to make it happen.

“To start with, I thought, ‘I’m not really cooking, because they’re doing it’, but actually the point was we were doing something together.

“We tried some really simple things like boiling an egg and I needed help with the hot water pan because I would drop it. I learnt it was okay to make a mess – the key point was not to give up.”

Slowly, Ian developed methods to cook and realised others could benefit from what he had learned and came up with the idea for a cook book he called Cookfulness.

The recipe book focuses on cooking with a disability or chronic condition. It doesn’t contain any photos of the finished dishes and the timings are adapted to allow a realistic cooking pace. 

“I don’t want people to feel there is a ‘success’ criteria,” he says. “Whatever you come up with – it’s right.” Ian now cooks every day.”

Ian’s top tips are to keep pre-chopped vegetables in the freezer, batch cook, prepare your utensils in advance, use all your space in your kitchen and dob’t be afraid to ask for help. “