GINGER AS A FORM OF MUSCLE PAIN RELIEF…

Ginger has been used in traditional Indian Ayurvedic medicine for intestinal discomfort and flatulence, as well as for inflammatory conditions, such as arthritis and rheumatism.

Ayurveda still forms the basis of much medical practice today in India, Sri Lanka and Pakistan, where orthodox Doctors work alongside Ayurvedic physicians.


Some well known herbal agents for pain are skullcap, valerian, tumeric, poppy, willow bark, St. John’s wort, angelica, motherwart, black cohosh, wild yam, lavender, cayenne, kava kava and rose. Essential oils of pine, lavender, peppermint, cinnamon, rose, clove, frankincense, rosemary, ginger, juniper and birch are all well documented analgesic agents.


Essential oils can be used to rub into painful, swollen joints or the herbs can be taken as a tincture or in tablet form and can help quieten the nervous system, and relax muscles, sooth pain and can have an anti inflammatory effect.In China, herbalists use bupleurum, ginseng and licorice to reduce and relieve pain resulting from inflammation and cat’s claw, a herb grown in South America has been found to reduce inflammation and researchers have discovered that it contains anti-arthritic compounds.


Don’t let people deter you from trying some herbal medicines, oils or tinctures. You just have to read all about it before you buy it and buy from a reputable dealer and if you are still not sure then check with your Doctor as some may clash with your regular prescription drugs.

On the NHS website they wrote –

“Ginger kills pain”, reported the Daily Express . It said that a study has found that “muscle pain from sport or gardening can be eased by eating ginger”.

This study compared the effect of capsules of raw or heat-treated ginger to a “dummy” capsule on muscle pain. Students were asked to take the capsules for 11 days, and carry out strenuous arm exercises on the eighth day. They then rated their muscle pain over the next three days. The ginger group rated their pain as slightly less than the placebo group in the 24 hours after the exercise.

Although the study used a good design and both researchers and participants were blinded, the study was relatively small (78 participants). This theory should ideally be tested in further, larger studies. It is also not possible to determine from this study whether ginger would have any effects on other kinds of pain or more intense exercise-related muscle pain.

Where did the story come from?

The study was carried out by researchers from Georgia College and State University and the University of Georgia. It was funded by the McCormick Science Institute (MSI), an independent organisation that supports research into the health effects of culinary herbs and spices. MSI receives funding from McCormick & Company, Inc., a manufacturer of culinary herbs and spices. The study was published in the peer-reviewed Journal of Pain.

The study was covered in the Daily Express and Daily Mail , who reported the story relatively accurately. You can read more on what kind of research this was, what the research involved and it’s conclusion on the NHS website.