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TIPS ON HOW TO USE HAND REFLEXOLOGY TO RELIEVE PAINFUL HEADACHES…

Hand reflexology is a massaging technique which works by applying pressure to reflex points within the hands. These reflex points are believed to be connected to other parts of the body. When massaging these points, the whole body is treated during the reflexology session.

One of the best reasons to try using hand reflexology is the total relaxation you will feel.

Hand reflexology is very safe but there are a few cautions to be aware of before having a session. For example, reflexology is not recommended during pregnancy as it can trigger early contractions.

Get yourself comfortable before trying any of these techniques by sitting in a comfortable chair in a quiet room. Start to relax by using some of your favourite oil on your hands. 

Rub the oil or cream on your hands for several minutes until completely absorbed. This will help to relax your hands and increase flexibility in preparation for applying reflexology.

Close your eyes and focus on any area of your body where you feel an uncomfortable pain. Sometimes you just feel as if some part of your body feels misaligned.

Press firmly on the reflex point and gradually increase the pressure to make sure you’re “activating” the reflex but stop if you feel some pain.

Wait a few seconds and repeat. You can press either 30 seconds or you can press and release the point of a pulsed for 30 seconds.

You can then apply on the other hand then sit quietly for at least 10 minutes. If possible, lie down and rest well for half an hour.

Drink several glasses of water after applying reflexology. Water will help to drain the toxins released from your organs and muscles during the session.

Before you try any of the reflexology points below or if you’re unsure if it’s safe for you or you have any concerns, you should discuss this with a professional reflexologist or with your doctor prior to trying it.

For headaches try the following. With your thumb and index finger, hold the centre of the webbing in your hand between the thumb and index finger, on your left hand and apply pressure for at least a minute. Switch hands and repeat. Another way is to place the pads of your fingertips on the sides of your forehead, then move them in small circular motions clockwise or anticlockwise. Using a drop of lavender oil on your hands before massaging can enhance this treatment. Finish with slow strokes across your forehead, from the centre to your ears, keeping the pressure gentle.

For a tension headache hold your index finger to the point located between the eyebrows where the nose and brow join, in the spot sometimes referred to as the ‘third eye’. Apply pressure for at least a minute.

For a migraine hold your thumb and index finger or two middle fingers, whichever is easier against two points located on the back of the neck, on either side of the spine, at the base of the skull. Apply pressure for at least a minute.

You can buy books or charts with the hand reflexology points if you find this beneficial. Hand Reflexology and Acupressure: A Natural Way to Health Through Traditional Chinese Medicine by Chen Feisong  (Author), Gai Guozhong (Author) is on Amazon for £12.99 – Though practices like acupuncture have become popular in the West over the last few decades, they have been a part of Traditional Chinese Medicine for thousands of years. Hand reflexology and acupressure are two techniques that can achieve similar results to more complicated practices like acupuncture but can be done at home, on yourself, without any tools. This book acts as a beginner’s guide to these pressure-based practices. Through illustrations and easy-to-understand language, readers can learn a variety of useful pressure points, how to properly utilize them and daily care that can be done to address certain health concerns. Through recent studies, hand reflexology and acupressure have been shown to help with a variety of issues, including, Nausea; Stress, tension and anxiety; Insomnia; Headaches; Chronic pain; Digestive issues; Muscle and joint injury. The safe, reliable techniques outlined in this book are easy for anyone to master and, importantly, can be used anywhere.

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OSTEOPENIA AND BACK PAIN…

Osteopenia is when your bones are weaker than normal and your bone density is lower than the average adult, but not so far gone that they break easily, which is the hallmark of osteoporosis. Your bones are usually at their densest when you’re about 30. Osteopenia, if it happens at all, usually occurs after age 50. The exact age depends on how strong your bones are when you’re young. If they’re hardy, you may never get osteopenia. If your bones aren’t naturally dense, you may get it earlier.

Losing bone density is a normal part of ageing. This happens at different rates in different people. In fact, many people have osteopenia in later life as their bones get older. It could also be due to genetics, medication taken for a different condition or having naturally smaller denser bones.

Osteopenia is considered a chronic condition, but it affects everyone differently. While some people with osteopenia may struggle to complete daily tasks without experiencing intense back pain or injuring a bone, other people don’t even realize they have this condition. 

UCF Health writes that “back pain is common in people who have osteopenia because the spine loses its bone density, which makes it more difficult to support the body. Without strong spine support, the body struggles to hold itself up to walk or to sit in an upright position.

There typically are no symptoms in the early stages of bone loss. But once your bones have been weakened by osteoporosis, you might have signs and symptoms that include: Back pain, caused by a fractured or collapsed vertebra. Loss of height over time.

Having osteopenia does increase your chances of developing osteoporosis which then increases the risk of fractures. Chronic low back pain patients have an increased incidence of osteopenia and osteoporosis. 

If your mother or grandmother suffered from osteoporosis (we all know someone who does), you can also start to see the signs of osteopenia between the ages of 30 and 40, when bone loss gradually starts.

Bone density is measured with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). DEXA is an imaging test that uses X-rays to determine whether you have healthy bones, osteopenia or osteoporosis. It provides a score called a T-score:

  • +1 to –1 indicates normal bone density.
  • –1 to –2.5 indicates osteopenia.
  • –2.5 or lower means osteoporosis.

DEXA gives healthcare providers a “baseline measurement.” That means they can compare the current test results to future results to determine whether bone density decreases over time.

There’s no cure for osteopenia, but it’s important to look after your bone density as much as possible. Treatment involves a simple approach to keep your bones as healthy and strong as possible and prevent it from turning into osteoporosis.

Source: UCF Health Cleveland Clinic Web MD

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MAY IS NATIONAL WALKING MONTH #WalkThisMay…

National Walking Month – #WalkThisMay May is Living Streets’ National Walking Month. This year, we’re encouraging you to #Try20 – and walk for 20 minutes each day during May.

Walking is an easy and accessible way to improve physical and mental health and a 20-minute walk can reduce the risk of a number of preventable health conditions, including certain cancers, depression, heart disease and Type 2 diabetes.

By swapping a short drive for a short walk, you can also help reduce air pollution, congestion and road danger – whilst saving yourself some money and getting active in the process! 

Check out Living Streets #Try20 tips, resources and checklist designed to help you stick to the challenge! 

WALK TO SCHOOL WEEK TAKES PLACE DURING NATIONAL WALKING MONTH. FIND OUT MORE HERE!

Do you love the outdoors but struggle to get the kids outside in all weathers? Here are five top tips from Muddy Puddles about how to make outdoor play fun, whatever the weather.

  1. Don’t make it overwhelming – A run around in the garden, a walk in the woods or a trip to a local park for an hour can all help to boost their health, without being too overwhelming.
  2. Comfort is key – Whether it’s a rainproof jacket and waterproof trousers, or an all-in-one puddle suit, you’ll just need a pair of insulated wellies to keep those little toes warm and you’re all set!
  3. Switch things up – A trip to the park or a walk with the dogs are always good ways to get outside, but there are lots of other ideas which might grab your children’s attention.
  4. Encourage interaction and spontaneity – While a mucky school uniform is a nuisance, there’s nothing wrong with getting filthy while playing outside. Encourage your children to interact with the outdoors space in whatever way inspires them -–regardless of how messy they get.
  5. Rope in their friends – While a mucky school uniform is a nuisance, there’s nothing wrong with getting filthy while playing outside. Encourage your children to interact with the outdoors space in whatever way inspires them -–regardless of how messy they get.

The Parks Trust say Celebrate National Walking Month – Throughout the month you’ll be able to attend a variety of walking events, take part in their Walking Festival as well as follow new self-led walking routes which will be released shortly.

This year’s Walking Festival will be taking place across the weekend of 7th to 9th May. Over this three-day period, there is an exciting programme of walks across the city, all of which vary in difficulty and duration meaning there’s always something for everyone. A great family walk is an introduction to Geocaching, or if you’re looking to find out more about the culture in Milton Keynes take part in the Public Art in Campbell Park walk.

The Walking Festival also includes walks to allow you to explore new areas such as Wolverton Floodplain and Waterhall Park. The Parks Trust would like to thank their Walking Festival partners and volunteers, without their support they wouldn’t be able to put on such a variety of walks.

Walks Around Britain has a list of all the Walking Festivals throughout 2022 in the UK.

Source: Living Streets Parks Trust Walks Around Britain