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USE YOUR HANDS TO HEAL WITH HAND REFLEXOLOGY…

Hand reflexology is a great way to treat yourself to help relieve some pain. There are four basic reflexology techniques you need to learn. These actions are creeping, rotating, spinal friction and achieving the right pressure when carrying out hand reflexology. The techniques are easy to pick up and you can start to heal yourself straight away.

The Daily Mail has a great article on the techniques you use for hand reflexology. Just check the article here. The techniques are easy to pick up and you can start to heal yourself straight away. Always start on the right hand first and complete the entire sequence before treating the left hand. This, according to practitioners, helps trigger the energy called ‘chi’ in the correct direction.

For lower back pain press the point where the centre of your hand joins your wrist and stimulate it. Always take medical advice if you do not know what the problem is. This is a perfect antidote to backache caused by sitting at a computer for too long.

The reflex is stimulated by direct pressure to the particular point. On the palm and wrist there are some 45 reflex points, and on the back of the hand 28 reflex points, that represent a particular organ, region, or function of the body. Combinations of reflex points are used in Reflex therapies.

Since hand reflexology is performed by applying pressure from fingers and thumbs on reflex points on the hands, the practice can provide an easy, cost-effective and safe way to treat ailments.

While reflexology hand mapping feels best (and may be more effective) when done by someone else, it is possible to work on oneself.

There are a number of online sites that show you how to apply hand reflexology from WikiHow to AOR Hand Reflexology Explorer where you can move the cursor to view the hand reflexology points and what they correspond to.

A great book with images is Press Here! Hand Reflexology for Beginners: A Practice for Promoting Self-Care by Stefanie Sabounchian  available on Amazon which says has colourful illustrations and clear instructions show simple but powerful techniques to add to your daily routine.

Practicing hand reflexology on yourself can help you achieve your goal of natural, holistic healthcare without the expensive weekly treatments. Hand reflexology, unlike the more common foot reflexology, is easy to incorporate into your wellness routine because it can be used anywhere—from riding the bus or listening to a lecture in class to enjoying a party. 

This fun, easy, and accessible introduction to self-care through hand reflexology teaches the fundamental principles of reflexology and guides you through the reflex map of the hands, where every part of our body has a corresponding reflex point. Follow the illustrations and simple instructions to quickly learn techniques to use daily for overall good health and a balanced body and mind. In addition, guided techniques help you learn how to use reflexology for specific health issues, organized by ailments.



The Press Here! series offers contemporary takes on traditional hands-on healing practices for a new generation of practitioners. These introductory guides feature easy-to-access organization, clear instructions, and beautiful illustrations of each technique. Other Press Here! topics include massage, reiki, and acupressure.

Try having a go on yourself by pinching the finger tips and thumb of your right hand. The pressure applied to each finger should be firm, but make sure it is not painful. A few seconds for each single finger tip will be sufficient. Now do the same with the other hand.

Always remember to check with your GP first if you are on medication.

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MYOFASCIAL RELEASE THERAPY FOR ALL TYPES OF CHRONIC PAIN…

Myofascial Release Therapy is another therapy that works around acupressure points. It is s now becoming one of best-known massage type of treatment for chronic pain, tension and muscular problems.

Myofascial release therapy (MRT) was originally coined by an osteopath, although today you will find that many well-trained physiotherapists, massage therapists and chiropractors also practice this technique because of its effectiveness. MRT is a hands-on treatment whose purpose is to break down scar tissue, relax your muscles and fascia, and improve posture. Myofascial release therapy is usually slow in nature, and can be deep but does not always need to be as such. Many practitioners state that the technique should be painful to be effective, while others argue that proper use of the therapy does not need to be painful at all.

Research has proven that fascia, like a muscle, has the ability to contract and relax and plays a major role in mobility and stability of joints. Myofascial Release UK say the general understanding of ‘myofascial release’ has changed over the last decade since MFR UK has been providing workshops for healthcare professionals. In the past, MFR was a treatment approach in its own right and everything else was called massage. However, with popularity comes ambiguity and what MFR is and how it’s applied has become somewhat lost in translation over recent years. Normally the term ‘massage’ describes a fluid movement over the body using lubrication. As the popularity of MFR grows, massage treatments are being renamed ‘MFR’ to keep up with the current trends creating confusion for both practitioners seeking professional MFR training and for clients seeking resolve from their #pain and discomfort.

There is a condition known as Myofascial Pain Syndrome which is a chronic painful muscle disorder and is common if you have experienced a muscle injury. Over time these myofascial restrictions can lead to poor biomechanics, altered structural alignment, compromised blood supply and pain. Other causes of myofascial pain are injuries to an intervertebral disc, general fatigue, repetitive motions, and some medical conditions.

It is characterised by the myofascial trigger points and the symptoms include persistent or worsening pain, deep and aching muscle pain, tender knots located in the muscles and pain after exercise or sporting activity.

Myofascial Pain Syndrome (MPS) is the name given to pain caused by trigger points and fascia (connective tissue) adhesions in the body, usually in muscle tissue, and inflammation in the body’s soft tissues.

Myo = muscle
Fascia = the main connective tissue in the body
Release = to let go, ease pressure

Many people with fibromyalgia also have chronic myofascial pain or CMP (formally known as Myofascial Pain Syndrome, MPS) and don’t even know it. It is often missed because it is easy to confuse the pain and it’s origins with that of FM. As a result, it is missed in the diagnosis. Both are connected to the musculoskeletal system, which makes up almost 50% of our body weight, but should not be confused as being the same. Understanding FM and CMP and what makes them tick, will empower you to help yourself. You will be able to figure out some of the contributing factors to your pain, where it originates and what makes it feel better. It will help you understand treatments and find the one(s) that work for you.

It was recently discovered that MPS is not actually a syndrome at all, but a neuromuscular disease. This is important news! The difference? Diseases have known causes and a well-understood process for producing symptoms. Myofascial pain due to trigger points is now considered a true disease, rather than a syndrome. Fibromyalgia is a syndrome like rheumatoid arthritis and lupus and has tender points (not to be confused with trigger points). Even with these differences, it is believed by many researchers that one can influence the other.

In America, sufferers are doing ‘self-myofascial release (foam rolling)’ using a lacrosse ball and foam to roll out trigger points. They say, ‘it can help reduce muscle soreness, increase mobility, and prevent problems created by tightness and poor tissue quality like plantar fascists, sciatica, and more.”

It is a scientific fact that all muscles and their fibrous coating and connective tissue that joins muscles to bones, the fascia, are a source of pain if the functionality is changed by an accident or normal wear and tear/degeneration. Muscles may develop Myofascial ‘tender spots’ or ‘Trigger Points’. These Trigger Points are not only painful where they are found, but may also send pain away from that spot, to what is called Referred pain.

Sources : Ezine, Ezine Myofascial Release UK