PLEASE OFFER ME A SEAT AVAILABLE IN CERTAIN AREAS…

In the event that you battle to stand while using open transport, there is a free identification badge which enables you to alarm others that you need a seat.

A considerable number of people have conditions or a sickness but have nothing to show about there condition are in need of a seat on all forms of transport. With this badge you don’t have to clarify your purpose behind the badge but you should be offered a seat.

Around 78 per cent of people who carry the TfL badge say that they now find it a lot easier to get a seat on the bus or Tube. But this is a London-centred scheme. With more than one in six people in the UK have an ‘activity limiting’ condition, accounts from across the UK generally paint a picture of inaccessibility and discomfort on public transport for those with invisible conditions.

If you see someone with a badge or card and you are seated, they say you should stand and offer them your seat. While there are priority seats on public transport, they would like to encourage all customers in any seat, to be considerate and offer their seat to those that are less able to stand.

I am surprised it has taken so long for this to be developed but just reading the difference it has made to people suffering from MS, cancer, being pregnant, to name a few. I just hope it won’t be long before other councils follow suit. If your council has launched this please let us know in a comment for others to take advantage of it.

Not all local councils cover this badge but it might be just worth writing to yours if you cannot find anything online. The ones I found were London, Greater Manchester, and Network West Midlands.

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IS THERE A LINK BETWEEN NECK CONDITIONS AND FIBROMYALGIA?…

Having had two previous cervical surgeries and suffering a great deal with neck pain this year, it was fascinating to read an article on Pinterest which said ‘ Is there a link between neck conditions and fibromyalgia ?’

The website ‘Upper Cervical Awareness‘ says there has been some interesting research that may point toward a link between fibromyalgia and problems in the neck. According to researchers in Germany, there is a higher incidence of neck and jaw problems in patients with fibromyalgia.

The 555 patients in the study were all experiencing either neck problems, jaw issues, or both. Of the 555, 63% met the criteria for a diagnosis of fibromyalgia. In fact, 83% of the patients with fibromyalgia were experiencing facial asymmetry.

I have to say that I do not suffer from any jaw problems just my neck and cervical spine.

Upper Cervical Awareness point out that although the study didn’t comment on the reason for the link, researchers recommended ‘a multidisciplinary approach to care that addresses neck and jaw problems. ‘

They go on to explain that when the top bone of the neck (atlas) is out of alignment, even by a fraction of a millimeter, it can affect the surrounding structures such as the muscles and other soft tissue of the neck and face. As a result, many people with an atlas misalignment experience either neck pain, face pain, jaw problems, or other similar symptoms.’

As a teenager I suffered a lot with what Fibrositis ( now fibromyalgia ) and it’s really strange that my pain was mainly cervical pain at that stage. My lumber pain started with a slipped disc which then became prolapsed over the years but reading through the lines of this article I feel I was definitely starting with fibromyalgia (as it’s called today) way back then.

Without these studies, even if some prove nothing we will not be able to truly understand all about fibromyalgia and when people first started suffering from it and what their first symptoms were.

As Upper Cervical Awareness point out ‘clearly, it is worth looking into an atlas misalignment as the underlying source of fibromyalgia symptoms.’