A BIG “THANK YOU” TO MY AMAZING PAIN CONSULTANT AT CIRCLE NOTTINGHAM HOSPITAL…

Lee from The Fibro Blogger Directory wrote a post on Facebook asking us all to think about writing a thank you post to a doctor or health person that has looked after us.

I knew straight away that I wanted to thank my Pain Consultant a Dr.Gregory Hobbs at Circle Nottingham Hospital, Queens Medical, Nottingham.

Dr. Hobbs has been looking after me for over 10 years now. I was sent to see him after a previous injection I’d had went a bit wrong and I needed resuscitating. It left me quite traumatised and anxious about having any further injections but Dr. Hobbs slowly introduced me initially to acupuncture and dry needling, and then onto trigger point injections and then facet joint injections to name a few. All to help ease my pain.

Whenever I had a flare up he would fit me in and would always go above and beyond to find a way to help calm things down. In all the years he has treated me I have had the same great care and concern from him and his team at Circle Nottingham Hospital.

I saw him only a couple of weeks ago for some more injections and told him that I would soon be moving to Brighton, a long way from Nottingham and I was obviously quite anxious about who I would see and what sort of treatment they will offer me. He soon wrote down the name of a pain consultant in Brighton whom he said would give me the same sort of treatments he gives me.

Thank you once again to the amazing NHS, Dr. Hobbs and his team at Circle Nottingham Hospital.

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DEALING WITH DEPRESSION WITH CHRONIC PAIN …

Depression is quite common with people suffering from chronic pain. I mean who wouldn’t feel a bit low when trying to cope with constant pain but there is help out there to deal with this type of depression. Research shows that some of these antidepressants may help with some kinds of long-lasting pain.

Web MD state that Doctors don’t know exactly why antidepressants help with pain. They may affect chemicals in your spinal cord — you may hear them called neurotransmitters — that send pain signals to your brain. 

It’s important to note that antidepressantsdon’t work on pain right away. It can be a week or so before you feel any better. In fact, you may not get their full effect for several weeks.

After my second spinal surgery I was put on a very low dose of an antidepressant which I took over a period of 20+years. I am still on this antidepressant ( Prozac) even though over the many years I haven taken it there have been numerous articles on the pros and cons of taking it for so long. In fact, only last year the Professor of Medicine whom I call my Medicine Man who I see on a regular basis, suggested that maybe I should stop taking it.

I started with reducing it to one every other day and had no ill effects except that I wasn’t feeling as perky as I usually am. I put it down to the fact that at that time last year I ways constantly going back and forth to stay at my Dads so that I could go and be with him in hospital. He was in three months and my sister and I would do three week shifts of going in for most of the day over a period of three weeks then coming home for a rest. Sadly Dad passed away in hospital by which stage I had already started increasing my drug to nearly what I had been on before as I had an even bigger reason for feeling low.

On the NHS website they say that even though a type of antidepressant called tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) weren’t originally designed to be painkillers, there’s evidence to suggest they’re effective in treating chronic (long-term) nerve pain in some people.

Chronic nerve pain, also known as neuropathic pain, is caused by nerve damage or other problems with the nerves, and is often unresponsive to regular painkillers, such as paracetamol.

Amitriptyline is a TCA that’s usually used to treat neuropathic pain. I also take this for my neuropathic pain and it also helps me to sleep better.

We are all different and try to deal with chronic pain, stress and even loss in different ways but for me personally I felt this one little pill I took every morning worked for me. When I went back for my review with my Medicine Man I told him what I had been through and said I felt for me personally it was one drug I would like to continue taking indefinitely if he felt that was safe. He said that every single person will have different views and reactions to different types of antidepressants but if I had found one that I truly felt helped me ‘feel good’ every day no matter what I was going through then he was happy for me to take it indefinitely.

I know there are lots and lots of alternative things to try for any type of depression from Cognitive Behavioural Therapy to Group Therapy and much more but I do feel that some people are nervous of taking medication on a long term basis but if that works for you, then why not.

Try everything that is available to you and when you find something that works for you then stick with it even it is taking a daily dose of medication. Feeling low and depressed is awful and most people in chronic pain must feel that at some stage but life really is to short to feel that way on a daily basis so why not try something just for you to help you feel better on the outside even if the pain on the inside is still there.

Some great websites and organisations that can help with chronic pain and depression are Away With Pain.

BLB Solicitors have a long list with links to UK support and help with depression from pain. The NHS also has details on Cognitive Behavioural Therapy in the UK and how to find a therapist.

HYDROTHERAPY AS A TREATMENT FOR OSTEOARTHRITIS, BACK PAIN AND FIBROMYALGIA…

 

Research has shown that if you suffer from fibromyalgia or osteoarthritis pain in the knee or hip, then aerobic and stretching exercises in warm water can help to relieve it.

There are three categories of exercises called hydrotherapy: hot water, cold water, and alternating hot and cold water. Hot water is known for stimulating the immune system and is also good for increasing your circulation. Cold water constricts blood vessels and is effective in reducing inflammation.

Using both hot and cold has been found to improve circulation. It was found that water heated to between 32 degrees C to 36 degrees C slightly reduces osteoarthritis pain over three months. They say that hydrotherapy changes lives and has been proven to be a highlyeffective form of natural therapy which works by stimulating the endorphins, which in turn helps you to control pain and alleviate tension.

The hydro bath works by releasing millions of large bubbles, which relax your muscular tension and helps reduce swollen joints, giving you increased mobility and more importantly lessens your pain.

Fibromyalgia Symptoms says that Hydrotherapy is actually one of the oldest types of health treatments in existence today. It still occupies a major place in medicinal treatment throughout China, Japan, and Europe. Believed to have healing properties, water has long been used to treat various illnesses, ranging from gout to depression. The use of thermal spas and baths was introduced by the Romans in the fourth century BC and since then has risen in popularity. Various forms of hydrotherapy are now used in countries all over the world.

Hydrotherapy appears to be particularly effective for those suffering from fibromyalgia. In particular, hydrotherapy techniques help to:

  • reduce muscle pain
  • improve sleep disorders
  • increase mobility
  • reduce stiffness

A variety of studies involving fibromyalgia patients and hydrotherapy have been performed. In one study, fibromyalgia patients were given therapeutic whirlpool baths twice a week for six weeks. Upon conclusion of the study, the patients involved had better muscle and joint function, reduced pain symptoms, and improved sleep quality.

Hydroptherapy UK says the only side effects are as with any water-based activity, caution should be exercised to remain safe from drowning. Almost all hydrotherapy is carried out in pools more shallow than the height of the person using it.

Patients should drink sufficient amounts of water to avoid becoming dehydrated.

The buoyancy of the water can make some activity seem easier, while it is actually working muscles very hard. Patients should get used to how their body feels after a session in order to gauge appropriate levels of activity (i.e. not “overdoing” it).

The warmth of the water may make a person feel dizzy.

If the hydrotherapy is taking place in a chlorinated pool, the patient should shower immediately after to avoid irritation to their skin.

Arthritis Research has an article on how you can access hydrotherapy through the NHS. They say that hydrotherapy sessions are available on the NHS, and most hospitals have access to hydrotherapy pools. Any member of the healthcare team should be able to refer you to an NHS physiotherapist if they think you might benefit from hydrotherapy. In some parts of the UK you can also refer yourself to a physiotherapist, who’ll assess whether hydrotherapy would be suitable for you. Check with your GP or call your local rheumatology department to find out if an NHS physiotherapist in your area will accept self-referrals.

They also say that scientific studies have shown that hydrotherapy can improve strength and general fitness in people with various types of arthritis. The exercises can be tailored to your individual needs, so you can start slowly and gradually build up your strength and flexibility.

The extra support that the water provides may make you feel like you can do more exercise than normal, so be careful not to overdo it. The exercise and the warmth of the water may make you feel tired after treatment, but this is quite normal. In general, hydrotherapy is one of the safest treatments for arthritis and back pain.

MY INTERVIEW ON UK HEALTH RADIO ON FUNDING FOR FACET JOINT INJECTIONS…

I have written in the past about facet joint injections for back pain. A cervical, thoracic or lumbar facet joint injection involves injecting a small amount of local anaesthetic (numbing agent) and/or steroid medication which can anaesthetize the facet joints and block pain. They are usually done under x-ray to guide the injections to the facet joints.

Recently funding for facet joint injections has been stopped in some post-codes but not in others. Unfortunately, mine has been stopped so my pain consultant has given me steroid injections into  my gluteal muscles in the hope this will give me some pain relief.

I can have them every four months just like I did with the facet joint injections and I am hoping they will last as well. I only had them done in December so it’s early days yet.

Mike Dilke from Relax back has a program on UK Health Radio and asked if we could have a chat about the funding problem and we also chatted about the two latest health apps, DRUGSTARS ‘ Giving by Taking and Talking MedicinesMedsmart app. 

LOW LEVEL LASER THERAPY FOR CHRONIC PAIN…

Low-level laser therapy is a red or near infra-red light, applied from a low power laser specifically for therapeutic usage, where the light penetrates deep into the tissues.

Apart from it being used for back pain, it is also employed to treat musculoskeletal injuries and disorders, as well as Fibromyalgia. A low-level laser differs in that it operates at very low levels of power and unlike high-power lasers, it does not heat or damage human tissue.

It can help back pain by reducing pain and inflammation. You would probably need several treatments before you notice much pain relief and combined with exercise can be more beneficial than exercise alone. They call it the cutting edge of nonsurgical pain relief and tissue repair. Laser therapy uses light waves to stimulate healing in soft tissues. It has a similar effect to ultrasound.

It is a low-level cold laser and is pain-free; it works from the infra-red spectrum which penetrates up to 3cm into the muscles tendons and ligaments of the body. The laser light then stimulates the cell body within muscles, tendons or ligaments causing them to oxidize and increase healing at twice the normal rate.

It can improve healing, pain reduction, increase circulation and decrease swellings. It is not available on the NHS, but there are a number of clinics throughout the UK which perform this type of pain relief.  There are a number of hospitals that do this type of treatment from the City Back Pain Clinic in London, the Orchard Clinic in Northants to The Secret Glow in Manchester, with lots more clinics throughout the UK.

It can also help with

  • Acute soft tissue injuries e.g. sprains/strains.
  • Back and neck pain.
  • Osteoarthritis.
  • Chronic pain syndromes e.g. RSI, frozen shoulder, chronic low back pain.
  • Fractures and non-union fractures.
  • Nerve pain (Neuropathic pain) e.g. from disc injuries.
  • Ulcers e.g. diabetic ulcers.