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WORLD OSTEOPOROSIS DAY OCTOBER 20th, 2020…

World Osteoporosis Day takes place this year on October 20th, 2020. It marks a year-long campaign dedicated to raising global awareness of the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis. WOD aims to make osteoporosis and fracture prevention a global health priority by reaching out to health-care professionals, the media, policy makers, patients, and the public at large. The campaign will feature “THAT’S OSTEOPOROSIS” as a headline, highlighting emotionally impactful visuals and stories of real people living with osteoporosis in all regions of the world.

The campaign will emphasize the direct link between osteoporosis (the silent, underlying disease) and broken bones, which have a serious, life-changing impact in terms of pain, disabilityand lost independence. It will also focus on osteoporosis as a ‘family affair’, with family caregivers often carrying the burden of care, and the disease affecting multiple generations of the family.

What is Osteoporosis?

  • Osteoporosis is the underlying cause of painful, debilitating and life-threatening broken bones – known as fragility fractures.
  • Osteoporosis is a growing global problem: worldwide, fractures affect one in three women and one in five men over the age of 50.
  • Osteoporosis affects families – family members often bear the burden of care
  • If one of your parents had osteoporosis or hip fracture, this may increase your own risk of developing the disease. Take the IOF Osteoporosis Risk Check to identify your risk factors.
  • At risk? Be sure to request a bone health assessment – take early action for prevention!
  • Bone health concerns the entire family – ensure your family maintains a bone healthy lifestyle.
  • Advocate! Sign the IOF Global Patient Charterand join OAD in calling on healthcare providers to close the massive ‘care gap’ which leaves many patients unprotected against a cycle of disabling fractures.

As most of my readers will know I have recently been diagnosed with Osteopenia which the NHS explains is the stage before osteoporosis. This is when a bone density scan shows you have lower bone density than the average for your age, but not low enough to be classed as osteoporosis.

Osteopenia does not always lead to osteoporosis. It depends on many factors. If you have osteopenia, there are steps you can take to keep your bones healthy and reduce your risk of developing osteoporosis.

Your doctor may also prescribe one of the bone-strengthening treatments that are given to people with osteoporosis, depending on how weak your bones are and your risk of breaking a bone. I have been put on medication twice a day and told to do some core workouts.

I do wonder however that had my pain team not sent me for a bone scan whether in a few years time, mine could have turned into Osteoporosis so I have been very lucky that it has been spotted.

If you head to the World Osteoporosis Day website you can read the inspiring, real-life stories of people from around the world who have been affected by osteoporosis and fragility fractures. And do not forget there is also a link on the site for you to see if you are at risk from Osteoporosis.

Help raise awareness of Osteoporosis in any way you can, post onto your media sites so it can be spread around the world on the 20th October.

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BACK PAIN AND OSTEOPOROSIS…

Osteoporosis is one of the natural signs of aging, and the International Osteoporosis foundation has stated that over 44 million men and women in the U.S suffer from it. This number is much larger if you look at it on a global scale.

So, what is osteoporosis?

In simple words, it’s a process where bones decalcify and start to crack. Because of the lack of calcium, the bones are now weaker. When the vertebra has cracks in them due to osteoporosis, a vertebral crush fracture can occur causing severe pain.

Women are more prone to this problem, and often experience hip fractures because of it. Since women have lower bone density than men, they lose more bone mass with age.

You’re at a higher risk of osteoporosis if your family has a history of it or if you suffer from estrogen/testosterone deficiency. Long term use of medication such as thyroid-replacement medication or corticosteroids can also cause this problem.

One of the best ways to prevent osteoporosis will be to ensure that you’re consuming enough calcium rich foods such as green vegetables, yogurt, milk, kale, sardines, etc. Avoid excessive protein intake and sodas which contain phosphates and caffeine – these products leech bone minerals and weaken your bones.

Common signs of osteoporosis are back pain, a hunched posture and your height may seem to have decreased. It’s best to see a doctor so that he or she can conduct a bone-density test to calculate the mineral density of your bones.

By the time you experience back pain due to osteoporosis, the problem has become quite severe. You’ll need to take immediate measures to arrest bone loss.

 

• Calcium supplements

You’ll need to get a calcium supplement that has about 500 mg of calcium per tablet. Take 3 tablets daily. The difference between prevention and treatment is that with prevention, you could just eat broccoli and other calcium rich foods.

Once you already have the problem, you really need to get your daily intake. Trying to get your calcium from normal food is difficult because you’ll need to consume a lot of food just to give you the same amount of calcium that you can get from a pill.

So, just get a high-quality calcium supplement from a reputable health store and you should be good to go.

 

• Vitamin D

You’ll need to get a vitamin D supplement to aid in the absorption of the calcium. Without sufficient vitamin D in your system, most of the calcium you consume will be excreted. Your doctor will be the best person to advise you here.

 

• Resistance training

The MOST important and powerful weapon for battling osteoporosis is resistance training. It may seem counterintuitive to exercise when your bones are frail. However, the truth of the matter is that when you exercise against gravity, your bones and ligaments get stronger.

Weight training does not just build muscle mass. It also strengthens your bones. While cardio training such as walking, running, etc. help to keep you in shape and preserve bone mass, nothing comes close to resistance training.

You would do well to join a gym or even just use weights at home to work your muscles. Squats, deadlifts, push-ups, rows, etc. are all excellent exercises that will strengthen your bones.

By following the 3 tips above, you’ll help to halt the advance of osteoporosis. You’ll feel better, and the exercise will make you stronger and fitter. The endorphins released during training will also act as a form of pain relief.

Your doctor may recommend treatments such as vertebroplasty, etc. So, be well-informed and do your own research before making a wise decision.

CHRONIC PAIN, FIBROMYALGIA, HEALTH, osteoporosis., world osteoporosis day

WORLD OSTEOPOROSIS DAY OCTOBER 20th 2018…

World Osteoporosis Day takes place this year on October 20th.

The World Osteoporosis Day (WOD) 2018 campaign calls for global action to improve bone health and prevent fractures due to osteoporosis, including vertebral (spine) fractures which often remain undiagnosed and untreated.

They invite the public, healthcare professionals and organizations worldwide to join IOF and its 240 member societies in raising awareness of bone health and calling for action on osteoporosis and fracture prevention in their communities.

Key messages of World Osteoporosis Day 2018

  • Osteoporosis is the hidden, underlying cause of painful, debilitating and life-threatening fractures
  • The most common of osteoporotic fractures are spine (vertebral) fractures, a major cause of pain, disability and loss of quality of life
  • Up to 70% of spine fractures remain undiagnosed, leaving sufferers unprotected against the high risk of more fractures
  • Back pain, height-loss and stooped back are all possible signs of spine fractures – ask for testing and treatment!
  • A family history of osteoporosis and broken bones is a sign that you too may be at higher risk
  • Advocate! Sign the IOF Global Patient Charter and join us in calling on healthcare providers to close the massive ‘care gap’ .
  • Osteoporosis is a growing global problem that respects no boundaries: worldwide, fractures affect one in three women and one in five men over the age of 50.