#BACKPAINBLOGUK, #fibromyalgia, #fibromyallgia symptoms, #health, #lowbackpain, #Monday, #pain, #Quotes, acupuncture, acupuncture, Acupuncture

ACUPUNCTURE BACK IN THE NEWS AS A SUCCESSFUL TREATMENT FOR FIBROMYLAGIA…

It seems I am constantly writing articles on pain relief using acu-points so it has to be something worth trying if you have not tried it before. I found it beneficial for my shoulders and neck but I haven’t tried it for low back.

I am a true advocate for all treatments using pressure points including acupressure mats, pillow, insoles and lots more and I seem to read an article on a regular basis on how it can help with pain especially for Fibromyalgia.

An article in Very Well Health last week that Acupuncture for fibromyalgia (FM) has become more common over the years, especially since more and more research has shown the benefits of this treatment. One in five people with fibromyalgia seek acupuncture treatment within two years of diagnosis.

It is well known that Fibromyalgia is a difficult condition to treat and many people will have tried everything from different types of drugs, supplements, complimentary and alternative therapies including Acupunture but this particular treatment seems to work well for many.

Using complimentary therapies and alternative therapies for Fibromyalgia seems to be the route most used and if this can mean you can cut right down on your drugs then it is definitely worth a try.

Acupuncture points are located on meridians; however, modern acupuncture may also be performed on myofascial trigger points, which are tight areas of connective tissue that can radiate pain.

Most people—even those with fibromyalgia—report no pain or just a momentary twinge when the needles are inserted and upon needle grasp. During and after treatments, it’s common to feel relaxed.

According to Very Well Health the theory held by Western medicine is that acupuncture stimulates or activates several mechanisms in the body, including the:  

Did you know that 2.3 million acupuncture treatments are carried out each year, traditional acupuncture is one of the most popular complementary therapies practised in the UK today. Yet statistics show that 1 in 5 of us would only consider acupuncture for sleep as a last resort. Almost a quarter of people admit they did not realise acupuncture could benefit… Continue reading

In 2016 I wrote that a UK trial showed patients who received ten acupuncture sessions were far more likely to be pain-free after two years than those who didn’t. An American study saw 60% of back pain sufferers experience a significant improvement after acupuncture. The word “acupuncture” means “needle piercing”. It is a traditional Chinese medical treatment using very fine… Continue reading

The NHS writes that acupuncture is sometimes available on the NHS, most often from GP surgeries or physiotherapists, although access is limited. Most acupuncture patients pay for private treatment. The cost of acupuncture varies widely between practitioners.

If you’re being treated by an acupuncture practitioner for a health condition or are considering having acupuncture, it’s advisable to discuss this with your GP.

#fibromyalgia, #health, #lowbackpain, #pain, Back Pain

PROGRESSIVE RELAXATION FOR CHRONIC PAIN AND FIBROMYALGIA…

Progressive relaxation is the gradual and conscious letting go of built-up tension in the body’s muscles. If you are unwell or recovering from an illness or surgery you can practice this form of relaxation in bed or in an easy chair.

HealthLine write that this is a way to relieve muscle tension, also known as Jacobson’s relaxation technique. Progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) is a form of therapy that involves tightening and relaxing your muscle groups, one at a time, in a specific pattern.

The goal is to release tension from your muscles, while helping you recognize what that tension feels like. When practiced regularly, this technique may help you manage the physical effects of stress. Research has also found that it has therapeutic benefits for conditions like:

  • high blood pressure
  • migraines
  • sleep issues

When you have become more confident you will be able to practice it yourself whenever you feel tired, anxious or otherwise stressed. This technique is best done in a quiet place for 10 to 20 minutes where you won’t be interrupted.

PMR was first described by an American physician, Edmund Jacobson, in the 1920s. Jacobson noted that regardless of their illness, the majority of his patients suffered from muscle pain and tension. When he suggested that they relax, he noticed that most people didn’t seem connected to and aware enough of their physical tension to release it.

This inspired Jacobson to develop a sequence of steps for tightening and then relaxing groups of muscles. He found this allowed his patients to become more aware of their tension, to learn how to let go of it, and to recognize what it feels like to be in a relaxed state.

Since then, the technique has been modified many times but all modern variations of PMR are based on Jacobson’s original idea of systematically squeezing and then releasing isolated muscle groups.

Fibromyalgia Treatment explain that the overall goal of relaxation therapy is to elicit the body’s natural relaxation response, which includes slower breathing, lowered blood pressure, and an overall sense of calm and well-being.

Relaxation therapies help to minimize the effects of stress on one’s mind and body, thereby allowing an individual to cope with depression, anxiety, and the symptoms associated with chronic conditions such as Fibromyalgia. There is also an added benefit to relaxation therapies in that most are able to be self-taught and self-administered, usually requiring only brief instruction from a book or an experienced practitioner.

It is also used for Arthritis and the Arthritis Foundation give details on how to practice this at home –

How to Practice Progressive Muscle Relaxation 

For each muscle group, tense for 10 seconds and release. Take a few deep breaths as you notice the sensation that comes as those muscles relax, before moving on to the next muscle group. Skip areas that cause pain when tensing.  

1. Sit in a comfortable position, with eyes closed. Take a few deep breaths, expanding your belly as you breathe air in and contracting it as you exhale. 

2. Begin at the top of your body, and go down. Start with your head, tensing your facial muscles, squeezing your eyes shut, puckering your mouth and clenching your jaw. Hold, then release and breathe. 

3. Tense as you lift your shoulders to your ears, hold, then release and breathe. 

4. Make a fist with your right hand, tighten the muscles in your lower and upper arm, hold, then release. Breathe in and out. Repeat with the left hand. 

5. Concentrate on your back, squeezing your shoulder blades together. Hold, then release. Breathe in and out. 

6. Suck in your stomach, hold, then release. Breathe in and out. 

7. Clench your buttocks, hold, then release. Breathe in and out. 

8. Tighten your right hamstring, hold, then release. Breathe in and out. Repeat with left hamstring. 

9. Flex your right calf, hold, then release. Breathe in and out. Repeat with left calf. 

10. Tighten toes on your right foot, hold, then release. Breathe in and out. Repeat with left foot. 

Repeat each of these steps as often as needed to help treat your arthritis symptoms.

#BACKPAINBLOGUK, #covid-19, #COVID-19, #fibromyalgia, #health, #lowbackpain, #pain, Migraine, Migraine relief

SOME TIPS ON DEALING WITH SPRING MIGRAINES…

Dealing with Spring Migraines, a few tips from Migraine Relief Center.

With warmer weather comes the urge to spend more time outside, enjoying the nice temperatures before we enter the heat of the summer which could be sooner than we think !

Unfortunately, with weather and environmental changes comes the less enjoyable allergy season.

Spring is a difficult time for many migraineurs who face the double hit of runny noses and increased migraines.

Here are some posts from Migraine Relief Centre’s website on dealing with allergies and seasonal migraines.

Allergies and Migraines: The One Two Punch of Spring

The Guide to Combating Spring Migraines

The Difference Between a Migraine and a Sinus Headache

The Weather Triggering Your Migraines

This spring, take appropriate measures to protect yourself against more intense migraines so you can enjoy this season to the fullest. For more details and lots more information on migraines head to The Migraine Relief Centre website.