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DYSTONIA – PAIN IN YOUR HANDS OR WHEN WRITING?…

Do you experience pain in your hands or when writing? Dystonia is a condition whereby sometimes it becomes painful to write or play an instrument due to cramps in the hand or arm.

The Dystonia Society is the only national charity providing support, advocacy and information for anyone affected by the neurological movement condition known as dystonia.

If the doctor is not able to explain what is causing the cramps, one possible cause is a hand dystonia (otherwise known as Writer’s or Musician’s Cramp). The symptoms vary and may be one or more of the following:

  1. Twisting or curling up of the hands while writing or playing an instrument.
  2. Fingers move of their own accord to unusual positions while writing or playing an instrument.
  3. Writing or playing an instrument becomes painful.
  4. Symptoms usually disappear when the above activities stop.

Hand dystonia commonly appears in people between the ages of 30 and 50. It is one form of dystonia – a condition that causes uncontrollable and often painful muscle contractions believed to be as a result of incorrect messages from the brain to the muscles.

Dystonia is a neurological movement disorder and, if the symptoms listed above are severe or damaging to quality of life, the correct course of action is for a GP to make a referral to a neurologist specialising in movement disorders. There are treatments for hand dystonia that can significantly reduce the symptoms in many cases.  Only a specialist neurologist has the knowledge and skill to diagnose and treat dystonia.  If the patient and their GP agree that the symptoms might possibly indicate dystonia then the GP should refer the patient to such a specialist.

Dystonia can mimic PD in various and assorted ways and diagnosis can be difficult depending on how the disease manifests its symptoms, which are quite similar to not only PD, but other neurological disorders as well. 

Focal dystonias are the most common types of dystonia. Cervical dystonia affects the neck muscles, whereas blepharospasm is known to affect the muscles around the eyes. When the jaw and tongue muscles are affected, it is known as oromandibular dystonia. The voice can be affected, causing a ‘crackling’ sound and known as spasmodic dysphonia. 

There are three primary types of dystonia: basal ganglionic, mesolimbic, and dystonia from the cerebellum. All three types are from the brain or brainstem, but presentation can be clinically different with symptoms.

 

There are also other conditions that can cause similar symptoms, one of which is carpel or cubital tunnel syndrome. The carpal tunnel is a narrow space in the wrist that contains the median nerve. It is surrounded by the bones of the wrist (carpals) and a thick tendon sheath. Friction will cause the tendon sheath to swell and enlarge limiting the space within the carpal tunnel. As a result, the median nerve becomes compressed leading to numbness and tingling within the wrist and hand. Symptoms can be treated conservatively, with night splinting, medications, and cortisone injections. However, carpal tunnel syndrome does not resolve on its own and worsens over time.

Cubital tunnel syndrome is caused by compression of your ulnar nerve at the elbow.  The ulnar nerve travels from neck down your arm through a tunnel at your elbow called the “cubital tunnel.” The nerve is especially vulnerable to compression because the cubital tunnel is very narrow and has very little soft tissue to protect it. This compression causes numbness and/or tingling pain in your elbow, hand, wrist, or fingers. This is commonly caused by leaning on your elbow for long periods of time or swelling caused by friction of your ulnar nerve rubbing along structures of the cubital tunnel.

Carpal Tunnel

Carpal tunnel and cubital tunnel syndrome are treated at first with conservative treatments like rest, changes in patterns of use, immobilizing the affected area with devices like splints or braces, physical therapy, medication and injections. If the symptoms do not improve after some time, your doctor may suggest a surgical procedure to relieve compression.

As you know I had cubital tunnel release surgery last year and my nerve conduction tests showed I also have carpal tunnel both of which are giving me a lot of pain at the moment. However, on the NHS list of symptoms of Fibromyalgia they do include tingling, numbness, prickling or burning sensations in your hands and feet (pins and needles, also known as paraesthesia)

The best way forward if you are suffering from any of these types of pain is to go and see your GP for him/her to decide your next move to finding out what the problem is.

Living Well with Dystonia is a great book on the subject written by by Daniel Truong;Mayank Pathak;Karen Frei (Author)  A Patient Guide provides comprehensive information on a wide array of Dystonias. It is intended for individuals with various forms of Dystonia who want to adjust lifestyle activities to accommodate this chronic condition, but do not want the disorder to define them. It is a resource and tool for both individuals with the disorder and their families to become better educated about the options available to them.

Source : Ezine Dystonia UK NHS Back Pain Blog UK

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TO BETTER DAYS WITH HEALTHIER JOINTS AND MUSCLES…

To Better Days from a clinic in New Zealand. This is the story of where this business began.

Dr John Lyftogt has been treating patients for nerve, joint and muscle ailments for over 30 years. In this time, he noted a lack of development in treatments for long-term sufferers (with the exception of opioids which can create other problems). Frustrated by the indifference shown by modern medicine, John and his physical education specialist wife Maria set out to explore new ways to help those suffering with long-term muscle, joint and nerve pain.

Using his scientific understanding of the body and connecting with medical professionals around the globe who specialize in muscle, nerve and joint pain, John developed a range of radical new treatments.

These have been used at his clinic in Christchurch as well as by a global network of doctors. John and Maria taught, and continue to teach, thousands of doctors around the world to this day.

The next step was to bring this treatment to sufferers outside of the clinic too. The patent for the topical formulation was taken out in 2010. Devastatingly, the development program was delayed not once but twice by earthquakes at its base in Christchurch.

Yet John and Maria were resolute in continuing to help more people around the globe – to show them there is another way and to lead them To Better Days.

Their comprehensive website covers lots of articles on exercise, mental health, nutrition, pain management, science, sleep, wellbeing and some personal stories. You can join there community at To Better Days to share and find tips. You could spend literally hours just reading through it all.

Their active joint patches soothe discomfort and improve the health of joints, nerves and muscles. You simply apply the patch directly where you need it and feel the benefit in as little as 30 minutes, with results that last up to 24 hours. They offer a trial pack which offers a combination of 3 big joint patches and 6 small joint patches. allowing you to trial our product on your back, shoulders, knees, fingers, wrists and ankles, at only £9.59.They kindly sent me this back to give a try.

With chronic pain in a number of areas I had to decide which area I might benefit from the most. I decided to try the largest of the patches on my hip just before I went to bed. The reason I chose to put it on then is because it’s my hip pain that wakes me up every night without fail so anything to give me a full nights sleep would be wonderful.

I was soon asleep as usual but the amazing thing was that the next time I woke up it was my alarm clock ringing out at 7.15am. I had actually slept through the night without waking up in pain. For me to just get one full nights sleep a week is a miracle.

On the instructions it says apply to clean, dry skin and apply directly to the affected area. The activation mark will disappear once the patch starts working. It then says peel off after use and remove any residue with warm soapy water. I shower every morning so I knew the patch would have to come off and I did notice my skin was quite irritated by it. This is not the first time this has happened. I have tried many different patches but always end up with an irritation. Ordinary plasters also cause me the same problem.

I felt pretty gutted after having such a good nights sleep. This will not stop me from using it again but maybe try the smaller patch next time and for the 12 hours instead of 24 so that I can get the benefit of the patch. 72% of customers rate their patches as excellent, with most saying they experienced a reduction in pain.