THREE DIFFERENT TYPES OF BACK PAIN…

1. Acute Pain

Acute Pain is a pain that lasts less than 3 to 6 months, or pain directly related to tissue damage. This is the type of pain caused by a paper cut or needle prick. Other examples of acute pain are like labour pains, the pain is acute and identifiable.

Acute low back pain is defined as a pain present for up to six weeks. It could feel like an aching, stabbing, burning, or dull pain. The actual intensity of this type of low back pain could range from mild to severe and could fluctuate or move to other areas of your body like your hip or thigh area.

2. Chronic Pain

Chronic pain describes pain that lasts more than three to six months, or beyond the point of tissue healing. Chronic pain is usually less directly related to identifiable tissue damage and structural problems. Chronic back pain without a clearly determined cause, failed back surgery syndrome (continued pain after the surgery has completely healed), and fibromyalgia are all examples of chronic pain. Chronic pain is much less well understood than acute pain.

Chronic pain can take many forms, but is often described as a pain with an identifiable cause, such as an injury. Certain structural spine conditions, including degenerative disc disease, spinal stenosis, and spondylolisthesis, can cause ongoing pain until they are successfully treated.

3. Neuropathic Pain

Neuropathic pain could be placed in the chronic pain category, but it has a different feel than chronic musculoskeletal pain. The pain is often described as severe, sharp, lightning-like, stabbing, burning, or cold. The individual may also experience ongoing numbness, tingling, or weakness. Pain may be felt along the nerve path from the spine down to the arms/hands or legs/feet.

It is thought that the pain is caused by damage or disease affecting the somatosensory nervous system. Neuropathic pain may be associated with abnormal sensations called dysesthesia or pain from normally non-painful stimuli (allodynia). It may have continuous and/or episodic (paroxysmal) components.

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10 HABITS THAT CAUSE BACK PAIN…

This infographic from Inversion Table Review Blog has 10 very important habits that can cause back pain.

They are simple every day movements that can greatly affect your back.

Sitting for too long is the classic one and one I think young children are doing far too much of that nowadays.

Having poor posture. When we were young you were awarded posture belts for good posture at school. They don’t seem to do that now.

Skipping exercise. Again the younger generation seem to prefer to sit with their iPhones which seems to have become the norm now.

Overlooking an unhealthy diet. With so many ready meals available, it has also become the norm to just buy a meal to pop in your microwave or oven but until home cooking is taught from an early age I don’t think this will alter quickly.

Sleeping on an old mattress. This is a fairly new idea to alleviate back pain. We do change ours regularly but was something that you probably didn’t do years ago,

Wearing high heels. I’m afraid I was very guilty of that but the fashion now is easy to follow in low or flat heels when not out on the town.

Letting stress build up. This is something I have written about before and is definitely applicable for people in any type of pain.

Watching too much tv. I guess this applies to point three and skipping exercise as so many people just watch some of screen for hours on end.

Ignoring back pain. This is very very important as the longer you leave it before you seek advice or help the harder it will be to sort the problem out.

5 USEFUL TIPS WHEN OVERWHELMED WITH PAIN…

These five useful tips from Pain Warrior Code are so topical and would help anyone when going through an acute phase of overwhelming pain.

Venting it out is something I would never have thought of doing and yet it makes complete sense. Get it off your chest instead of bottling it all up. I tend to keep it to myself as I feel it’s the same old all the time but actually an acute attack can knock you for six and unless you let others know what you are going through then they will not know how to help you.

Encouraging yourself that it’s just an acute phase and not a chronic one can also put your mindset into the I can get through this part of a flare-up. As I am sure by now all my readers know that I am a massive advocate of rest. Without my rest I would not be the person I am today, I would be a very miserable person. I can’t stress enough how even forty winks can kick-start your own endorphins to help you cope with pain.

And of course my way of redirecting my thoughts is to write.

TUESDAY TIPS FROM #BACKPAINBLOG – THE IMPORTANCE OF REST DAYS…

Our Tuesday tips this week are the importance of rest days for people suffering from any type of pain.

Is there such a thing as too much rest? What if you get out of shape or lose muscle? Is it necessary to rest completely, or is “taking it easy” enough, and for how long? How do you know when to lay off and when to “use it or lose it”? How can you rest anatomy that you need to use all day, every day?

Pro Health say that ‘Rest is a key factor in successfully managing and living with fibromyalgia.  However, most people with fibromyalgia tend to push themselves to their limit every day.  Often this results in a push/crash cycle – doing way too much one day, then taking several days to recover.’

When you are in less pain it’s easy to expand more energy than you have available. I do it all the time and then my symptoms are intensified and I’m in the bad books with the family. ‘The trouble is ‘, as I say to my family, ‘the bell doesn’t ring until after I’ve overdone it.’

Spine Universe wrote that some specific benefits for fibromyalgia sufferers are:

  • It strengthens your muscles. Muscles that are lean, flexible, and strong combat stress. Strong muscles also support your body and bones better, which aid movement and support.
  • It increases energy. People with fibromyalgia often experience debilitating fatigue, and regular physical activity can help boost energy and endurance levels.
  • It promotes a restful sleep. Research shows that exercise helps you fall asleep and stay asleep longer. Sleep disorders are a common fibromyalgia symptom—one that exacerbates the disorder’s widespread pain. Better sleep can mean less pain.
  • It’s good for your mental health. Exercise reduces stress, anxiety, and depression—all common symptoms associated with fibromyalgia.
  • It keeps the weight off. The more weight you carry, the more stress it puts on your body, causing pain. Exercise, along with a balanced diet, will help you reach or maintain a healthy weight.

I think we all know that doing nothing at all while in pain does not mean you will get better but pacing yourself and resting regularly can definitely give a kick start. I redesigned my bedroom to feel like a sanctuary and most days between 3-4pm I close my blinds, pop my heat cushion on and get under the duvet for 40 winks. The difference for me if I don’t have my rest days is pain, pain and much more pain.