4 TYPES OF PHYSIOTHERAPY THAT WILL HELP REDUCE BACK PAIN…

There are several methods of treating back pain. There are non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) which help to reduce prostaglandins and deter the COX enzymes… and we also have holistic methods such as acupuncture which works for many, but has no effect on some. I have written about the four I have listed before but not in one post and with us all being at home so much at the moment we have to be careful with our posture to avoid aggravating our spines.

The truth of the matter is that we’re all individuals and no two people are alike. What works for some may not work for another. One man’s meat is another man’s poison, so to speak. This is especially applicable to holistic methods such as physiotherapy.

These methods take time to work, but when you do find one that works for you, the relief you get can be immense. It’s all a matter of patience and finding one that yields results.
Strong medication such as pain killers and NSAIDs can have side effects. Surgery is expensive and has risks. In fact, the thought of surgery alone is enough to make most people’s hearts skip a beat.

It’s best to try the holistic methods first and see how they work for you. In this article, we’ll look at 4 different types of physiotherapy that you can use to alleviate your back pain. Not all may work for you, but you’ll definitely find at least one that helps bring you relief.

COLD TREATMENTS…

This method will require you to place an ice pack on the area that’s affected. Always remember to place a towel on the affected part before placing the ice pack on it. Do not ice the area for more than 20 minutes.
Cold treatment will help to numb the swollen tissues and reduce the pain. It’ll also interrupt the pain messages because the nerve impulses are affected by the cold. Muscle spasms will decrease and any swelling and inflammation will subside to some degree… and this will bring relief.

ACUPRESSURE…

Acupressure is a method of massage where pressure is applied on specific points of the body known as acupoints. This is a Chinese method of holistic treatment and while it has drawn scepticism, many people have benefitted from it.
The theory states that by manipulating the acupoints, the energy in your body can flow freely, and this will aid in healing. You’ll have to try it to know if it works for you.

ACUPUNCTURE…

Similar to acupressure, but instead of fingers massaging you, slim needles are inserted into the acupoints to stimulate and relax the muscles in the area at the same time.
The life force (qi) will flow freely, and you’ll feel better. Millions of people have reported positive results by using acupuncture to treat back pain and migraines. It’s worth a try.

HEAT TREATMENT…

Similar to cold treatment, but you’re using heat this time. It may seem strange that heat works too. After all, unlike ice which numbs the area, won’t heat aggravate it?
Not really. When you place heat on the affected area, the soft tissues will relax and become less stiff. So, there will be more flexible and you’ll be able to move more easily. The heat will also dilate the blood vessels which will help to improve blood circulation.

Your back will feel much better when fresh oxygenated blood that’s rich in nutrients flows around it and aids in healing. Do note that you shouldn’t apply heat therapy to a back injury that’s less than four days old. Only give these 4 methods a try after you have checked with your GP first.

 

A PHYSIOTHERAPIST – IS THAT LIKE A PHYSICAL THERAPIST?…

A physiotherapist is a specialist seeing patients affected by illness, injury, or disability through manipulation and exercise along with other resources to encourage movement and functionality. The professional is capable of seeing people of all ages for health maintenance, assisting them with pain management and disease prevention. The goal for this therapist is to facilitate recovery enabling independence for as long as the patient remains capable.

A ‘whole-body’ approach inclusive of general lifestyle is the basis for this science-reliant position in well-being and health. A core component with physiotherapy is patient involvement via education, empowerment, awareness, and full participation throughout the process. It has a broad spectrum of benefits with the potential to aid those who sustain sudden injuries, people enduring back pain, those managing long-term ailments, preparation for athletics, or childbirth. But what is the difference between this professional and a ‘physical therapist in a clinic?

Physiotherapist vs. Physical Therapist

Confusion ensues for patients left to schedule an appointment for physical therapy(go to https://www.libertyptnj.com for an example of a PT clinic), and they’re facing a choice between a physiotherapist or a physical therapist not understanding the difference. Claims exist that physiotherapy concentrates more on hands-on manual rehabilitation while physical therapy is more focused on exercise as rehabilitation. A majority of those involved in the industry, however, insist the terms are synonymous often used interchangeably, in fact.

A point of distinction regarding the phrasing can have some basis in the various regions throughout the world such as Canada, Australia, and within Europe where the specialty deems the title physiotherapy compared to the reference physical therapy as it’s known in the United States. Regardless of how you denote the profession, the essentials are the same. They, of course, both have a medical background with a concentration on injury prevention, flexibility improvements, and acute pain management primarily along with a multitude of other designations. The goal for these specialists is to bring a person with severe injury or chronic illness to a place where their lifestyle improves, exercises of daily living become more manageable, and the quality of their life enhances.

What Is Involved in Physiotherapy?

Some claims state that physiotherapy treatment is a hands-on approach to rehabilitation. Still, it involves a variety of procedures and preventative techniques depending on the particular issues for which you may be dealing. With a first visit to a clinic, there will be an initial evaluation to assess the level of treatment that you may require. Follow https://healthtimes.com.au/hub/physiotherapy/8/guidance/nc1/what-do-physiotherapists-do/467/ to read about what these professionals do. The three primary methods for care include:• Advice and educating• Movement with exercises• Manual therapy

Other forms of care may have use in conjunction with these procedures, such as ultrasound or acupuncture, often.

The concept behind this specialty is to approach the body wholly rather than concentrating on the sole source of the injury or illness. The clinic will provide essential advice on how to enhance well-being as a critical aspect of the treatment. The education can include ways in which you can perform daily activities with less chance for injury or pain. Or, if you have chronic pain, there may be suggestions given on proper lifting techniques or posture.

The physiotherapist is going to provide exercises in an attempt to improve overall functionality and mobility. They will advise as to the importance of remaining active and the way to do so safely and effectively. In most situations, there are exercises assigned to be performed while at home as well for continuity.

Manual therapy is useful in an attempt to manipulate, massage, and mobilize body tissue. The treatment aids in alleviating pain and stiffness, increases blood circulation, encourages efficient fluid drainage through areas of the body, helps with the movement of the body, and encourages relaxation. Patient care involving manual therapy is beneficial, particularly for those suffering from serious ailments. It has the potential to reduce stress and decrease anxiety typical with long-term conditions. Follow this link to learn why this form of specialty is being used.

Summary

Physiotherapists focus their energy on giving patients as much of their independence as they’re capable of for as long as they are capable. The goal for this professional is to teach their patients to maintain an active and functional lifestyle, perform activities of daily living, achieve a sense of well-being, basically enjoy their life as a whole.

ONE SIMPLE LIFESTYLE CHANGE THAT CAN SIGNIFICANTLY REDUCE YOUR BACK PAIN…

One simple lifestyle change that can significantly reduce your back pain is a guest post from Tavistock Clinic in Crawley.

None of us are strangers to back pain.

It’s the leading cause of disability in the UK. In addition, 80% of the population experience back pain at one stage or another in their life and it is one of the most common causes for absence days at work.

Back pain is often a mystery. The reason being, it can be caused by such a wide variety of reasons.

You may twist your back whilst reaching something on the floor, and the pain is caused by overstretching the muscle. You may have had a car accident, where the pain is caused due to the physical impact to the muscle. You may even be getting back pain from emotional trauma or certain foods that you react to unknowingly.

Many of us also know the importance of ‘bending at the knees’ and not your back when lifting items.

This is staple (and correct) advice that everyone should follow. The notion is that you should use your leg muscles to pick something up off the floor, instead of putting the pressure into your back.

There’s something missing though: what about all the things you pick up from that mid-range area, between the knees and torso region?

I’m not sure about you, but I don’t think I’ve ever seen anyone in a squat position whilst lifting something off the kitchen counter, dining table, or when putting dishes into the dishwasher.

The vast majority of ‘bending’ we do is at the mid-line level – where squatting by the legs simply does not cross our minds, nor is it practical, or swift enough.

Yet, we still put the pressure into our backs, and not into our legs. How do we resolve this?

In truth, there is another posture of bending that everyone needs to know about, but no one actually does… yet.

‘Hip hinging’ is bending by your knees and ‘hinging’ by your hips at the same time.

It means you still get to bend down from your back and reach down (from the bend in the knees), without having to do a full squat (with your back perfectly upright) but without any undue stress into your spine.

Buffalo Rehab provides a picture-perfect demonstration of the difference between a normal pick up and a hip hinge:

Picture number 1 on this image slide is how the vast majority of people would pick something up from knee level.

Picture number 2 on this image slide shows the perfect position of lifting. You can see I the back is almost horizontal, which may make you think it’s terrible for the spine.

Picture number 3 offers a separate alternative of lifting, also known as the golfers’ grip, which is still safer for your spine than the first picture.

The question should always be, however, ‘why is the spine in that position?’

In picture number 1, the spine is bent because the spine itself and the spinal muscles are folding forward (flexing).

In picture number 2, the spine is not actually bent at all – it’s straight (no, it’s not an illusion!).

The reason it’s horizontal is that the hips are hinged forward.

This is a perfectly normal and safe movement for the hip to do, and when you lift an item from the ground the force goes into the hip and back of the legs primarily, with less stress on the lower and upper back.

There are a number of examples in the professional sporting and exercise world that demonstrates the importance of the hip hinge.

Whenever you see someone doing a squat in the gym, if done correctly, they will be hip hinging:

The same goes for if you are doing one of the staple back strengthening exercises, the deadlift:

Many people think this exercise is dangerous because you are not specifically ‘bending by the knees’ as much as you would think, but the truth is the spine is completely neutral in this position, so the stress is primarily on the hip and legs, where it is supposed to be.

At Tavistock Clinic we offer physiotherapy in Crawley and we advise strongly to every one of our sports and exercise clients to ensure they are hip hinging both during their rehabilitation from injury but as well as part of their prehabilitation to minimise the chance of future injuries. 

So how do you learn to do the hip hinge?

The PTDC demonstrates, through use of video, a series of highly effective exercises to help you make the hip hinge second nature for you as much as possible.

With these exercises and awareness of your hip and spinal posture during any lifting activity, you are much more likely to save your spine in the future and prevent unnecessary and potentially severe back pain.

I hope you’ve found this article useful and informative. If you have any questions feel free to contact me directly on kulraj@tavistockclinic.com

Happy Hip Hinging!

FATE TAKES TWO HANDS, MEMOIRS OF A PHYSIOTHERAPIST, Free on Kindle (limited time)…

The book ‘Fate Takes Two Hands’s Memoirs of a Physiotherapist’ was written by my mother in law who wrote about her life before she became a physiotherapist during the Second World War.

Based on a true story this is a heartwarming tale of a wartime working life of a physiotherapist during the Second World War. Born in Manchester in 1916, the author went with her parents to a pantomime to see Peter Pan. From that day forward she set her sights on being on the stage with her name in lights.

However, her mother and father had other plans for her. She tried every trick in the book to avoid going down their career route, and shares her love, loss and friendships to pursue her dream of being an actress.

That was until she met Audrey, who changed her direction in life into the hospital theatre rather than the dramatic theatre.

Separated from her beloved family she bravely endures a trip on her own across the world to be with her loved one, and writes in detail of the patients she was treating during the war.

I promised my mother-in-law before she passed away that I would do my up,OST to get it printed for her and after reading it, I knew I had to give it a go. With no chapters or paragraphs and hand written in quite a difficult script it did take me nearly 2 years to finish but I got there in the end.

From today until Thursday 17th January this book is free to read on Kindle as I would love some reviews from my readers on her book and the finished product. Many thanks.

BEYOND THE BACK – BOOK REVIEW…

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Beyond the Back: The Chiropractic Alternative For Conditions Beyond Back Pain: 9 Top Chiropractors Share How They Help Patients Avoid Drugs and Surgery Naturally…

Written by nine chiropractors –  Suzanne Doyle-Ingram (Author), Steve Polenz (Author), David Sundy (Author), Stephane Provencher (Author), Gil Desaulniers (Author), Matt Thompson (Author), Jessica Thompson (Author), Jeff Pereverzoff (Author), Marion Constantinides (Author), Victor Dolan (Author) only available on Kindle.

Beyond the Back focuses on the various solutions that chiropractic care offers – besides back pain. In this book, you will learn:

•How Chiropractic can help you have more energy and get more out of life
•How Chiropractic can help you have a healthy pregnancy
•How to raise Superkids
•What are Epigenetics?
•How Chiropractic can heal knee injuries naturally
•How Chiropractic can help multi-generational families
•The Benefits of Applied Kinesiology
•Chiropractic care for athletes

Because most of the general population thinks of Chiropractors as back pain specialists, many people are simply not aware of all the other aspects of health that Chiropractic can improve. In fact, in some cases, Chiropractors can help their patients get off medications entirely and even avoid surgery.

For me on a personal note I was looked after by a Chiropractor in my younger years for many years until he was unable to get me straight any more and so I had to resort to surgery. I have recommended Chiropractors to people suffering from joint problems many times and some had great results.

The section on Pregnancy is a great chapter for mum’s to be and I wished I had known about Chiropractors before my first born. The questions and answer sections on how a Chiropractor can even give you more energy will ring a bell with most people. At the moment it’s only available on Kindle format but well worth a read if you have a Kindle to download it onto.