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ACUPUNCTURE BACK IN THE NEWS AS A SUCCESSFUL TREATMENT FOR FIBROMYLAGIA…

It seems I am constantly writing articles on pain relief using acu-points so it has to be something worth trying if you have not tried it before. I found it beneficial for my shoulders and neck but I haven’t tried it for low back.

I am a true advocate for all treatments using pressure points including acupressure mats, pillow, insoles and lots more and I seem to read an article on a regular basis on how it can help with pain especially for Fibromyalgia.

An article in Very Well Health last week that Acupuncture for fibromyalgia (FM) has become more common over the years, especially since more and more research has shown the benefits of this treatment. One in five people with fibromyalgia seek acupuncture treatment within two years of diagnosis.

It is well known that Fibromyalgia is a difficult condition to treat and many people will have tried everything from different types of drugs, supplements, complimentary and alternative therapies including Acupunture but this particular treatment seems to work well for many.

Using complimentary therapies and alternative therapies for Fibromyalgia seems to be the route most used and if this can mean you can cut right down on your drugs then it is definitely worth a try.

Acupuncture points are located on meridians; however, modern acupuncture may also be performed on myofascial trigger points, which are tight areas of connective tissue that can radiate pain.

Most people—even those with fibromyalgia—report no pain or just a momentary twinge when the needles are inserted and upon needle grasp. During and after treatments, it’s common to feel relaxed.

According to Very Well Health the theory held by Western medicine is that acupuncture stimulates or activates several mechanisms in the body, including the:  

Did you know that 2.3 million acupuncture treatments are carried out each year, traditional acupuncture is one of the most popular complementary therapies practised in the UK today. Yet statistics show that 1 in 5 of us would only consider acupuncture for sleep as a last resort. Almost a quarter of people admit they did not realise acupuncture could benefit… Continue reading

In 2016 I wrote that a UK trial showed patients who received ten acupuncture sessions were far more likely to be pain-free after two years than those who didn’t. An American study saw 60% of back pain sufferers experience a significant improvement after acupuncture. The word “acupuncture” means “needle piercing”. It is a traditional Chinese medical treatment using very fine… Continue reading

The NHS writes that acupuncture is sometimes available on the NHS, most often from GP surgeries or physiotherapists, although access is limited. Most acupuncture patients pay for private treatment. The cost of acupuncture varies widely between practitioners.

If you’re being treated by an acupuncture practitioner for a health condition or are considering having acupuncture, it’s advisable to discuss this with your GP.

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BPB ALERT: – FOLLOW UP FROM “TWENTY WAYS TO ENJOY COOKING WITHOUT PAIN”…

Only a day after writing the blog post – “Twenty Ways To Enjoy Cooking Without Pain a blogging friend sent me a link to the BBC on an article entitled “Fibromyalgia and pain: How cooking gave me my life back”

In the article Bryony Hopkins BBC Ouch, wrote that Fibromyalgia sufferer Ian Taverner said “When he turned to his cookbooks while managing fibromyalgia, he found the timings unachievable and the expectation of the photos overwhelming.”

“The pain was so bad I couldn’t hold a knife, I couldn’t stand up to cook, I couldn’t carry anything,” he says. “I almost gave up before I started.” “Ian spent years “existing” until the NHS referred him to the pain management programme at the Bath Centre for Pain Services – the last form of treatment available to him.”

Initially, he took to the kitchen alone, but found he needed the support of his wife and girls to make it happen.

“To start with, I thought, ‘I’m not really cooking, because they’re doing it’, but actually the point was we were doing something together.

“We tried some really simple things like boiling an egg and I needed help with the hot water pan because I would drop it. I learnt it was okay to make a mess – the key point was not to give up.”

Slowly, Ian developed methods to cook and realised others could benefit from what he had learned and came up with the idea for a cook book he called Cookfulness.

The recipe book focuses on cooking with a disability or chronic condition. It doesn’t contain any photos of the finished dishes and the timings are adapted to allow a realistic cooking pace. 

“I don’t want people to feel there is a ‘success’ criteria,” he says. “Whatever you come up with – it’s right.” Ian now cooks every day.”

Ian’s top tips are to keep pre-chopped vegetables in the freezer, batch cook, prepare your utensils in advance, use all your space in your kitchen and dob’t be afraid to ask for help. “

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TWENTY WAYS TO ENJOY COOKING WITHOUT PAIN…

One of my favourite pass times is baking but it can literally leave me in agony so it is important to know how to take steps to avoid pain while cooking. I always say that ‘ I will never let the pain beat me’ but knowing my limits is how I can enjoy baking without the consequences.

Preparing the vegetables or decorating a cake can soon trigger off pain, but if you have your kitchen organised in the right way and use specialist types of equipment it will mean that you can spend far more time enjoying cooking.

Since lock down my way of seeing my family, (even though it was at a distance with them at the front door and me outside the gate), was to bake for them. I loved seeing my granddaughters face peeping through the window when Nana arrived with some goodies. However, it has meant that I have had to look at how to make it simpler so I could enjoy my baking without suffering afterwards. Here are my top twenty tips on how to cook without causing too much pain.

1.The easiest way to get around this problems is to plan ahead for the week.

2. If you have some children or a partner at home that can help prepare some meals, then delegate the difficult jobs for them to do.

3. Concentrate on foods with multiple uses by making a stew that can last two meals, like a roast chicken, followed by a chicken salad or a chicken curry.

4. Crock pots can be a godsend for Fibro and Back Pain sufferers, your whole meal all in one pot.

5. Buy frozen or prepared vegetables if you have no one to chop your vegetables for you. We use onions, peppers, mushrooms and mixed vegetables for all our casseroles.

6.Try and have one afternoon where you could cook three or four meals in one hit, using left-overs to make soup or casseroles, and only cook when you are ‘good’. If your best time is in the morning then cook then, if its in the afternoon then cook then.

7. Set your pantry or cupboard out so you can easily get your pans/dishes without the need to keep bending over and moving things.

8. Use pots and pans with two handles, they are easier to hold.

9. Use a stool if you really cannot stand for long at all. They can be a godsend.

10. If you have trouble opening jars then buy a ‘multi bottle grip opening tool.

11. Store frequently used items in cupboards between knee and shoulder height.

12. Buy packet soups rather than tins if you have trouble opening cans, or buy an electric can opener.

13. Create planned leftovers which you can freeze and have available for another day.

14. Store spices in a drawer or on the counter rather than in a high cupboard. I have mine in a small service trolly on wheels which is easy to pull out and get my spices and baking products.

15. Put all your baking utensils into a basket so when you feel you want to bake everything is all together.

16. Spatulas, spoons, ladles, whisks and other cooking tools which feel comfortable in your hand can greatly improve manual dexterity, reduce pain, and compensate for swollen and deformed joints.

17. There are many choices and designs for cooking tools and kitchen aids that can make cooking easier, such as ergonomic, lightweight cooking tools, which have easy grips and non-slip handles. Like these four ergonomic set of wooden baking tools.

18. If you want to try out a new recipe then look for ones that are easy to cook. I have done all my baking with the recipes from the book Mary Berry’s Fast Cakes: Easy Bakes in Minutes. The recipes are brilliant and lots are prepared all in one bowl which is brilliant.

19. Of course the most important one of all is to pace yourself ( I find this very hard). Do everything in stages. Prepare, rest, prepare.

20. When pulling a hot dish from the oven, take advantage of the sliding grate. This allows you to not overextend your back.