#backpainblog, #BACKPAINBLOGUK, backpainbloguk, back pain, chronic pain, fibromyalgia, health, chromic pain, reviews, #DNA Do Not Age, #health, #Quotes, #sleep, sleep deprivation, sleep positions, sleep sunday

SLEEP SUNDAY – LET’S TALK ABOUT WHAT WE CAN TAKE TO HELP US SLEEP…

What do you take to help you sleep?

I have probably covered most things on Sleep Sunday so it’s quite difficult to find something genuine to write about that might help your sleepless night become a good one so I decided to write today on herbal/natural sleep aids and also gummies which I truly found helped me get through some tough nights.

Melatonin is a hormone that plays a key part in regulating your natural body clock. You can take a manmade version of melatonin for short-term sleep problems (insomnia). It makes you fall asleep quicker and less likely to wake up during the night. It can also help with symptoms of jetlag. Studies have shown that melatonin improves sleep quality, particularly in the elderly. Melatonin is used to treat sleep problems in people aged 55 and over. It can sometimes be prescribed to help with sleep problems in children and to prevent headaches in adults. Melatonin is available on prescription only. It comes as slow-release tablets and a liquid that you drink.

Take Valerian as it is thought to have a sedative effect. Studies have shown that the root of the valerian makes getting to sleep easier and increases a deeper sleep. For thousands of years, the herb valerian has been used as a sedative in Europe and Asia. Many people throughout the world use it to treat insomnia and anxiety. It seems to give people better-quality sleep. It may also help them fall asleep faster.

Eat more leeks and onions or garlic and artichokes as they contain prebiotic fibres that fuel the healthy bacteria in our gut and can have a profound effect on our health and sleep.

Try a herbal remedy with hops, passionflower and Valerian.

A handful of other studies looking at clinical models also suggest that chamomile tea may help people relax. Sleep Tea – by Niche Tea has a chamomile and lavender blend that naturally eases tension, while the lemon blam creates a mile tranquilising effect. Sweet Dreams Tea – by Infinitea which has soft camomile and sweet apple notes, tempered with light mint. A luxury medley of flavours which include Apple, Lavender, Camomile, St. John’s wort, Lemon balm, Licorice, Fennel, Peppermint, Valerian, Natural flavours (organic compliant).

Lavender which has been around for years and years but of course is not something you can digest but again is available in tea form or you can use drops on your pillow, lavender eye masks, sprays for your pillow and even diffusers.

And The Mail recently wrote that “There is some evidence from good quality clinical trials that some herbal remedies can improve sleep. Saffron extract, passionflower and ashwagandha root have all been studied. ‘The effects weren’t huge, but there were no increased adverse reactions,’ says Dr Selsick. ‘So they’re worth trying.’ Also available in pharmacies and health-food shops are supplements such as valerian (aka ‘nature’s Valium’) and magnesium, which is an essential mineral for health. A magnesium deficiency is thought to cause restless sleep.”

I have recently found SureSleep from the company DNA to really help me sleep better. I would normally wake up several times with pain and then find it difficult to get back to sleep but these have really helped me settle down and go back to sleep again. Each capsule contains 400mg SureSleep (Prunus Cerasus, Rhodiola Rosea, Valerian Root).

Source: Niche, Infinitea NHS Web MD DNA

#backpainblog, #BACKPAINBLOGUK, backpainbloguk, back pain, chronic pain, fibromyalgia, health, chromic pain, reviews, #fibromyalgia, #health, #lowbackpain, #mental health, #nhs, #sleep, walking

NATIONAL WALKING DAY- APRIL 6th, 2022 & 17 REASONS TO TAKE UP WALKING FOR YOUR HEALTH…

National Walking Day is every year on the first Wednesday in April, 6th 2022. National Walking Day is exactly as it sounds – a day to celebrate the easiest way to be the healthiest version of you. Walking for thirty to sixty minutes per day may sound like it isn’t much, but studies have shown that it can drastically improve your health.

No matter how small your walk is there is proof that it will benefit your health if you walk on a regular basis. Take a look at the following 18 benefits to walking daily.

1. To help tone your muscles.

2. To boost your immune system.

3. To reduce the risk of cancer.

4. To help you sleep better.

5. To help you to keep fit.

6. To activate stronger and healthier bones.

7. To make you feel more energetic.

8. To improve your confidence.

9. To help strengthen your heart.

10. To keep your weight in check.

11. To help prevent osteoporosis.

12. To boost your Vitamin D levels.

13. To make you feel happy.

14. To lower blood pressure.

15. To delay ageing.

16. To increase lung capacity.

17. To address key symptoms of Fibromyalgia.

HISTORY OF NATIONAL WALKING DAY

The National Today website write about the History of National Walking Day. Walking has always been a part of being human. Many archaeologists have found that even when humans were nomadic tribes, we would often walk great distances to stalk our prey (think Wooly Mammoths) and wait for them to sleep before pouncing. Walking is, essentially, what humans are physically we best at. We’re the slowest runners, the worst swimmers, and we can’t even fly without a big jet engine. Walking is the humans bread and butter.

Maybe that’s why during the Victorian era there was a little fad called pedestrianism, where walking became one of the major spectator sports in America and Europe until baseball usurped it. But individuals would wager massive bets over whether walkers could make it marathon distances and under what time. There’s a reason why racewalking is an Olympic sport, after all.

Whether it’s John Muir’s spiritual journeys through the woods; pilgrimages to Mecca; or just a casual stroll through your local park, walking has always held a close, dear place in the hearts of humans. It’s no wonder that there are so many health benefits associated with it and also why National Move More Month and National Walking Day were created promote this fantastic and surprisingly easy pastime.

Source: National Today

#backpainblog, #BACKPAINBLOGUK, backpainbloguk, back pain, chronic pain, fibromyalgia, health, chromic pain, reviews, #fibromyalgia, #lowbackpain, #pain, #sleep, HEALTH, sleep sunday

SLEEP SUNDAY – LET’S TALK ABOUT SLEEP DEPRIVATION AND THE PROBLEMS IT CAN CAUSE…

Some facts about sleep deprivation and pain.

What is sleep deprivation?…

According to the Sleep Association – Sleep deprivation is defined as not obtaining adequate total sleep. When someone is in a chronic sleep-restricted state they’ll notice excessive daytime sleepiness, fatigue, clumsiness, and weight gain or weight loss. In addition, being sleep-deprived affects both the brain and cognitive function.1

Interestingly, there’s a subset of cases whereby sleep deprivation can actually lead to an enhanced mood, alertness, and increased energy. Note that relatively few studies have compared the different effects between chronic partial-sleep restriction and acute total sleep deprivation, and the total absence of sleep over long periods of time has not been studied in humans. That being said, long-term total sleep deprivation resulted in death in lab animals.

Many Fibromyalgia and chronic pain sufferers say they feel lucky if they get 5 hours of sleep a night.

Do you ever find yourself stuck in a vicious cycle?

Pain makes it difficult to sleep, but sleep deprivation means the body cannot repair itself – making the pain worse. Healthline points out that people with chronic pain don’t necessarily see improvements in sleep once their pain is resolved.

In fact, the pain often only continues to worsen until sleep is addressed. This may be related to the fact that some people with chronic pain may battle anxiety which in turn may cause stress chemicals such as adrenaline and cortisol to flood their systems. Over time, anxiety creates overstimulation of the nervous system, which makes it difficult to sleep.

The National Sleep Foundation points out that sixty-five per cent of those with no pain reported good or exceptionally good sleep quality, while only 45 per cent of those with acute pain and 37 per cent of those with chronic pain did the same. Additionally, 23 per cent of those with chronic pain reported higher stress levels, compared with 7 per cent of those without pain.

Those with acute or chronic pain are more likely to have sleep problems impact their daily lives. Among people who’ve had sleep difficulties in the past week, more than half of those with chronic pain say those difficulties interfered with their work. That drops to 23 per cent of those without pain.

People with pain are also far more apt than others to report that lack of sleep interferes with their mood, activities, relationships, and enjoyment of life overall.

People with pain also feel less control over their sleep, worry more about lack of sleep affecting their health and exhibit greater sleep sensitivity. They’re more likely than others to say environmental factors make it more difficult for them to get a good night’s sleep. These factors include noise, light, temperature, and their mattresses alike, suggesting that taking greater care of the bedroom environment may be particularly helpful to pain sufferers.

While both chronic and acute pain is related to lost sleep, the survey indicates that chronic pain is an especially powerful problem. Indeed, one in four people with chronic pain, 23 per cent, say they’ve been diagnosed with a sleep disorder by a doctor, compared with just 6 per cent of all others.

Sleep station comment that It’s a never-ending battle and a vicious circle between sleep disturbance and pain. In some there may be an element of chicken and egg – is the pain-causing sleep problems or is the mediocre quality of your sleep making your pain feel worse?

Pain can, for example, be the main reason that you wake in the night, and these interruptions during the night can lead you to get less sleep, and most important of all, less excellent quality restorative sleep. This sleep deprivation can lower your pain threshold and your tolerance for pain and thus can make your pain feel worse.

PubMed writes “Chronically painful conditions are frequently associated with sleep disturbances, i.e. changes in sleep continuity and sleep architecture as well as increased sleepiness during daytime. A new hypothesis, which has attracted more and more attention, is that disturbance of sleep cause or modulate acute and chronic pain.”

Source: Sleep Association Healthline Sleep Foundation Sleep Station Pub Med