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BPB ALERT – ENDOSCOPIC SPINAL SURGERY THE BEST ROUTE FOR LOWER BACK PAIN…

Deseret News wrote that endoscopic spinal surgery need not be only for the physically fit people struggling with severe pain issues relating to spinal compression. This type of surgery expands opportunities for certain patients, those that are older or a little bit frailer and for whom a small surgery and quicker recovery makes sense, particularly when doing an open procedure has greater risks.

Endoscopic spinal surgery is limited in scope to primarily disc herniations and the narrowing of the spinal cord, which is essentially like an open procedure but done with smaller tools, which means it takes longer. With an endoscope, you don’t need to remove things to see, and you can achieve a decompression of the spine that removes less bone.

Advantages to having endoscopic spinal surgery are that it is done under local anesthetic with a skin incision of only 5-10mm length, which is significantly less invasive than open spine surgery. The pain relief is immediate or within a few hours after the surgery. And, it allows the patient to return home within 24 hours after the operation so much less risk of developing any complications.

The BMI Healthcare group which list MISS (minimally invasive spinal surgery) write about MISS as minimally invasive spinal surgery that early treatment is the most practical, successful and cost-effective solution to back pain. Back pain is caused by a number of different conditions, many of which can be diagnosed and treated by our team of highly specialised consultant surgeons and physiotherapists.

MISS allows treatment for a greater variety of conditions for patients of a wider age and infirmity range unlike previously where none could be offered. Minimally invasive spine surgery is very promising and has the distinct advantage of all endoscopic surgery (avoiding soft tissue and bone trauma). It gives the patient a much faster recovery, with a reduced surgical risk.

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LEARN HOW YOUR SPINE WORKS TO UNDERSTAND WHAT IS BOTHERING YOU…

Your spine is made up of a column of 33 bones, called vertebrae, which are stacked one on top of another like Lego bricks.

There are 7 cervical vertebrae in your neck, which includes one which links to your skull, 12 thoracic vertebrae in your chest, 5 lumber vertebrae in your mid/low back and 5 sacral vertebrae at the bottom of your back and finally 4 bones in your coccyx, which is the tail end of your back.

All these joined together are able to give you the ability to curve and flex your spine.

Attached to your vertebrae are your muscles and ligaments. Ligaments are tough fibres which help to keep everything in place. Nerves appear from gaps between each pair of bones which then supply your muscles and then carry sensations to your brain.

Major muscle groups also support and help to stabilise your spine, providing your spine with the ability to flex, extend, twist and bend sideways.

The lumber nerves have a bundle of nerve fibres known as the sciatic nerve, which supplies the legs and feet.

In between the bones are the discs which stop the spine from jarring acting like a cushion to enable you to move. These disc make up about a quarter of the height of the spine. They come in two parts, a jelly which is the centre piece for your discs and supports the weight, and a series of concentric rings which keep the jelly in place.

Behind your discs nerves pass through and behind this is what is called a facet joint, which allows your bones to move on another. All the bones are joined together by ligaments.

The more you learn about how your back works, the more you will understand when it’s bothering you.

Source: Polyclinic, London Norwich Spine