GLASGOW TRAVEL RETAILER DONATES 5,000 (£125K) COMPRESSION SOCKS TO HELP FRONTLINE SCOTS NURSES…

A positive news story to share in the midst of everything that is going on.

Press pics taken by Peter Devlin available from dave@zudepr.co.uk

In order to help in any way that they can and to boost morale, a Glasgow online travel retailer whose sales have dropped 95 per cent in the past two weeks has donated 5,000 pairs of compression socks to help Scots nurses combat Covid-19.

Worth £125,000, the colourful knee-length socks will help 5,000 acute nurses in six hospitals across Scotland fight fatigue in the coming weeks.

And the firm has pledged to give away 5,000 more in the next seven days to nurses in London, bringing the total to 10,000 (£250,000).


Trtl (pronounced ‘turtle’) has donated the compression socks to acute nurses at Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Royal Alexandra Hospital (Paisley) and Queen Elizabeth University Hospital in Govan. Each hospital has received 1,000.


In addition, nurses at The Royal Edinburgh Hospital will take 1,000 while Trtl has given 500 to nurses at Dundee’s Ninewells Hospital and 500 to Aberdeen Royal Infirmary.

The award-winning company, which employs 30 people in Glasgow, had stockpiled thousands of the socks in advance of its peak summer season. But with sales stalling due to the Covid-19 pandemic and little prospect of travel bans being rescinded any time soon, CEO Michael Corrigan decided to use them to support frontline nurses in his home city, across Scotland and in worst-hit London instead.


He explained: “Although the compression socks have been most popular with airline travellers, at the start of this year we ran a small campaign with nurses around the world and they were really happy with them. “Over the past few days, I’ve been thinking about how we can contribute in what is the biggest crisis many of us will face in our lifetimes. “When something like this happens it very rapidly puts things into perspective. “Nurses across the UK will be tested as never before in the coming weeks and if we can do something to help make the time they spend on their feet more comfortable, we must.”

“I couldn’t just see these socks sitting in a warehouse when they could be helping people saving lives. That’s what’s important, and nurses need all the help they can get just now.” John Stuart is the chief nurse at Glasgow Royal Infirmary. He said: “We are under no illusions about what we are going to face in the weeks to come. “Our nurses work incredibly hard and can spend hours and hours on the move during every shift. “With these compression socks we can help our staff alleviate some of the discomfort and aches associated with being on your feet for long periods of time and help them better face the challenges that are coming our way with Covid-19. “Any gesture like this can help boost morale and hopefully the colourful designs will help brighten the days of our nursing staff.”

A 2015 study found that the average NHS worker walks 3.6 miles a day with some recording up to 11 miles. Nurses regularly work 12-hour shifts and wearing compression socks reduces leg soreness, swollen ankles and varicose veins.


Established in 2013, Trtl is majority-owned-and-run by founder Michael Corrigan (32), who was born on Glasgow’s south side. He added: “This may be the biggest challenge we will ever face as a generation and how we react as individuals and collectively could define us in the years to come.” Best known for its Trtl Travel Pillow, which has sold 1.6M worldwide, Trtl sells a range of travel items from compression socks to packing pods. Most of its products are bought online through trtltravel.com and retailers such as Amazon.


The company, which won Small Exporter of the Year at the Scottish Export Awards in 2018, is expert at using social media and messaging apps to drive sales.

Trtl’s aim is to make travel comfortable, enjoyable and stress-free, so that both business travellers and vacationers alike can arrive at their destination refreshed, rested and ready to explore.

The company has also been featured on Dragons’ Den (The UK equivalent of the US Shark Tank), Huffington Post, The Financial Times, The Telegraph, Inc, BuzzFeed, Men’s Health and GQ. Trtl has won a raft of prestigious gongs for its exporting and digital media expertise including the Summit, Scottish Export and Shell Livewire awards.

Press pics taken by Peter Devlin available from dave@zudepr.co.uk

HELP SLOW THE OUTBREAK OF COVID-19 WITH THE SYMPTOM CHECKER APP…

Download the C-19 COVID Symptom Tracker App and self report daily. Help slow the outbreak. Identify those at risk sooner.

Take 1-minute to self-report daily, even if you are well to help the scientists identify high risk areas in the U.K. who is most at risk, better understanding symptoms linked to underlying health conditions. See how fast the virus is spreading in your area.

By using this app you’re contributing to advance vital research on COVID-19. The app will be used to study the symptoms of the virus and track how it spreads.

This research is led by Dr Tim Spector, professor of genetic epidemiology at King’s College London and director of TwinsUK a scientific study of 15,000 identical and non-identical twins, which has been running for nearly three decades.

The COVID Symptom Tracker was designed by doctors and scientists at King’s College London, Guys and St Thomas’ Hospitals working in partnership with ZOE Global Ltd – a HealthPost science company.

They say ‘We take data security very seriously and will handle your data with huge respect. Your data is protected by the European Union’s “General Data Protection Regulation” (GDPR). It will only be used for health research and will not be used for commercial purposes. You can read more about how your data will be used, your rights and the steps we take to ensure it’s protected in our privacy policy or in the FAQ.

You can read more at King’s College London, BBC NEWS, The Guardian, and The INDEPENDENT.

Available from the App Store or Google Play.

REVIEW ON JOYA SHOES – BLISS FOR YOUR BACK…h

I was given the opportunity to try a pair of Joya Shoes which they explain ‘support the natural movement process and encourage active walking. Joya shoes also promote healthy posture, which provides relief to the back and joints and can also reduce and prevent back and joint pain.’

As a chronic back pain sufferer walking out in the open is something I only really enjoyed occasionally when I was having a good day with my back. My biggest problem was deciding how far I could walk on any particular day so I was very excited to see if these shoes would make any difference.

The first impression when I put the shoes on was how high and supported I felt. It felt a bit like walking on air. The soft and springing material of the Joya sole transforms a hard and flat floor into a soft, elastic surface.

This, they say ‘increasingly activates small support and stability muscles again, which can remove stress from the joints and the spinal column. Plus, “micro movements” support the activity of the foot, calf, and leg muscles, which enable active walking and standing.’

Well, I have to say I am more than impressed with these shoes. The last few weeks have been an ideal time for me to see how far I could walk while in isolation. We are lucky enough to have lots of walks on The South Downs on our doorstep and the dry weather over the last couple of weeks has meant it safer to walk off-piste.

When my daughter first saw me in a pair of Joya shoes she thought I looked ‘very trendy’, which at the end of the day is also important to us women. Their shoes most definitely do what they say and relieve the back pain and cushions the feet and support healthy walking. Joya Shoes website explains in great detail about how these shoes work with a video and all about the Optimal pressure distribution, Joya ensures smooth rolling movement and optimum pressure distribution. This prevents pressure spikes in heel and forefoot. Joya footwear enables natural movement and encourages active walking.

At the moment one of their suppliers ShoeMed has an offer of 15% discount on full RRP to everyone Code: HURRY15. The code is valid until the end of the month. I wouldn’t hesitate to give these shoes a try if you get back pain during or after walking.

SELF DIAGNOSING BACK PAIN…

The most common type of back pain that people suffer from is often acute back pain. This is pain that’s severe and happens out of nowhere, or at least it seems that way. In reality, there’s often a trigger that caused the pain, and you’ll be able to remedy the problem once you figure out what it is.

Chronic back pain, however, is recurrent and can last for weeks or months, and sometimes even longer. It’s usually related to diseases such as osteoporosis, degenerative disc disease, etc. The severity of your back pain usually dictates whether you’ll see a doctor or not. Most people with mild back pain, tend to just wait things out and rest. While this is understandable, if the pain is nagging and doesn’t go away, you must see a doctor as soon as possible so that any possible problems can be treated in the early stages, before it turns into some chronic.

SUDDEN ONSET OF BACK PAIN…

If you have sudden onset back pain, this could be due to an injury or a fall, or a strain. In some cases, the pain may only show up a day after the event, so you may have forgotten about it.

For example, if you strained your back while moving the couch, your lower back may start to throb or hurt a day later. By then you may have forgotten about the couch and be wondering why your back hurts. So, you’ll need to think back.

This is just one example. Working out at the gym, braking suddenly while driving, or even bumps to the back can cause back pain. In these cases, some pain killers and rest will suffice.

Usually, lifting heavy objects or twisting your trunk may cause sudden onset back pain. The facet joints get temporarily out of alignment and this will cause the joint to get inflamed. The surrounding soft tissues and muscles will get swollen and hurt. You may need to see a doctor.

GRADUAL ONSET OF BACK PAIN…

Another type of back pain is one that starts gradually. Sciatica is one such issue. If you have pain that’s located between your lower back and glutes, you might be suffering from ankylosing spondylitis. Pregnant women whose backs are strained will also display similar symptoms.

Another serious gradual onset of back pain arises when there is inflammation in the sacroiliac joints. In cases like these, you must see a doctor. Numbness around your back and buttocks, loss of bladder control, pain during bowel movements, etc. are all signs of back issues that require professional medical attention.

CHRONIC BACK PAIN…

With these types of back pain, it may seem like there’s no cause. The pain may come and go away. It’s episodic, recurrent and not as severe as acute back pain.

Usually, chronic back pain arises due to poor posture that takes a toll on the joints and muscles over time. Correcting your posture will remedy the problem. It could also be due to ageing, where your joints suffer wear and tear.

If the pain is persistent or worsens, there may be inflammation. It’ll be best to see a doctor.

These are the 3 types of back pain that generally affect most people. What you really need to know is that when assessing your pain, you must be honest with yourself. If the pain is getting worse, do not bury your head in the sand and expect it to go away. Keep a diary so you can explain in detail about your pain should you need to see a GP.