UNDERSTANDING HOW YOUR BODY FEELS PAIN…

Understanding how your body feels pain may help you to appreciate how it comes about.

Pain basically results from a series of electrical and chemical exchanges which involves three major components, your peripheral nerves, your spinal cord and your brain.

After pain starts messages move through nerves up the spinal cord. Then the brain intercepts the messages as pain, including where it is, intensity and nature. For instance, burning, aching or stinging.

The speed by which the messages travel can vary. A dull, aching pain, like from an upset stomach or an earache is relayed on fibres that travel at a slow speed. Whereas the feeling of severe pains is transmitted almost immediately.

When pain message reach your spinal cord, they meet up with nerve cells that act as ‘gatekeepers’, allowing or refusing the messages to pass through to your brain.

The ‘gatekeepers’ open the gate wide to your message of severe pain, for instance if you touched a red hot pan. You also have nerve cells in your spinal cord which may also release chemicals that increase or subdue the messages, which can then affect the speed at which they travel to your brain.

All in all a very clever system is set up to enable us to deal with so many different types of pain.

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NATURAL PAIN KILLERS AND PAIN ENHANCERS…

Your brain and spinal cord actually produce their own pain killers. These are similar to pain relieving drugs like morphine.

Two of these are called endorphins and enkephalins, which, when they are released, they attach themselves to spinal receptors in your brain, which produce ‘stop-pain’ messages.

On the other hand, some substances in your body do completely the opposite. They intensify your pain. A protein called substance P then stimulates nerve endings at the site of the injury, increasing pain messages.

Other pain enhancers work by activating normally silent nerve cells in the injured area. This then sends pain messages which can actually worsen the pain you are in and make the area of pain worse.

Some herbs for natural pain relief include…
  • Ginger. … 
  • Turmeric. … 
  • Capsaicin. … 
  • Valerian Root. … 
  • Magnesium. … 
  • Cats Claw. … 
  • Boswellia. … 
  • White willow bark.

but always check with your Doctor first before starting to take any natural pain relievers.

Dr. Jokers have their list of natural pain relievers

8 TIPS ON HOW TO FIND INNER PEACE…

1. A basic meditation which you could try for 10 minutes each day is to start by finding a quiet space and sit comfortably with your hands on your lap, keeping your back straight and neck relaxed.

2. Now breathe deeply and gaze into the middle distance and take nice deep breaths in through your nose and out through your mouth and on the last exhalation, close your eyes,

3. Notice your posture, the weight of your arms and hands, the sensation of your body touching the chair, your feet on the ground and what you might smell, hear or taste.

4. Now turn your mind inwards to scan your body from head to toe, observing any tension or discomfort then scan again making a note of the parts of your body that feel the most relaxed.

5. Notice any thoughts that arise without trying to alter them.

6. Now observe the rising and falling of your breathing in your body and where the sensations occur. Focus on the quality of each breath, deep or shallow, long or short, fast or slow.

7. Count 1 as you inhale, 2 as you exhale, 3 on the next inhalation and carry on in this pattern until you get to 10. Repeat this five or six times and if any thoughts appear to guide your attention back to your breathing.

8. Spend 20 to 30 seconds just sitting then slowly become aware of everything and slowly open your eyes.

11 TOP TIPS TO HELP YOU COPE WITH THE SYMPTOMS OF FIBROMYALGIA…

1. If at all possible try to de-stress as apparently stress may trigger Fibromyalgia Symptoms. Some of the best de-stress treatments you could try are yoga, exercise, sleep and meditation.

2. ‘Fibro Fog’ is a common ailment of Fibromyalgia so rather than getting frustrated that your short-term memory has let you down, try and get into the habit of jotting things down on paper on a daily basis,

3. Exercise, as in low-intensity exercise like walking, or warm water exercise is great for helping the pain of Fibromyalgia. This type of exercise can decrease pain and stiffness.

4. Have a long soak in a warm bath or hot tub as this has been proven to relax tense muscles which will then reduce pain.

5. Try to use decaf as caffeine can increase anxiety and insomnia, so watch your intake of chocolate, coffee, teas and some soft drinks.

6. Also, try and make some ‘me time’ for yourself every day as part of your treatment.

7. Make your work life balance work for you. If work is leaving you exhausted and in pain then design a flexible plan that works better for you and your boss. Maybe try some products like a telephone headset or keyboard tray.

8. Talk about your Fibromyalgia with your family and those around you. Let them know what can trigger it or make it worse. Never be afraid to ask for help from either your friends, family or other Fibro sufferers or a counsellor.

9. Many people call Fibro the ‘invisible illness’, as you can look find be feeling awful. So, when arranging your social life be prepared to say ‘no’ to something if you know it will be too much for you.

10. Try and keep a journal so that you can see what can trigger off an attack, then you can do something about it.

11. Join a support group, be it in person or online, they offer a place to talk to others who share your problems.

2019 NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTION TO WALK MORE FOR BETTER HEALTH…

Walking for health encourages people to get active by arranging health walks up and down the Country for all levels of fitness.

Walking will improve stamina, help keep weight gain at bay and reduce your risk of major diseases. 20 minutes of walking can burn up 100 calories.

It is also beneficial for SAD sufferers who feel low and lathargic due to the lack of sunlight in the winter months. At this time of year one in eight of us can suffer from winter blues and one in 50 of us suffer from SAD through lack of sunlight.

Its the sunlight that tells your brain to produce serotonin, which is needed to boost our mood and energy. Lack of it as autumn turns to winter causes an increase in the production of melatonin (which makes us sleepy) and a reduction in serotonin is what can cause depression.

One of the most obvious ways to treat SAD is to get outside in the daylight for at least 20 minutes a day but you can also invest in a light box. Light therapy is the most effective way of decreasing the symptoms. Also it is believed that eating foods rich in an amino acid called tryptophan increases the amount of serotonin in the brain.

Also they say that Australian research found that taking vitamin D supplements for only five days in late winter improved the mood of people with SAD. It can also prevent osteoporosis, support immunity and regulate weight. Of course the best way to get Vitamin D is through the effects of sunlight on bare skin. Amazingly they say that Vitamin D lasts for 60 days in the body so if you’ve been away for your annual

Walking for life was set up in 2000 and now has over 600 local schemes with 66,000 regular walkers nationwide.

For more details of walks in your area go to the Walking for Health website.