CHRONIC PAIN, FIBROMYALGIA, HEALTH, myth

TOP 9 MYTHS ABOUT CHRONIC PAIN…

They say that many of the beliefs about pain and pain relief are actually false!

 

Myth #1

No pain, no gain’, is a classic example of this myth that is said amongst athletes but in actual fact, there is no evidence to support the actual notion that you can build strength by pushing your muscles to work to the point of actual pain. However, resting and letting your muscles repair, although probably not very macho, is the sensible thing to do.

Myth #2

Another common myth ‘it’s all in my head’, but the pain is a complex problem, involving both the mind and the body. Pain is an invisible problem that others can’t see, but that doesn’t mean it’s all in your head.

Myth #3

It may not always be possible to completely control your pain, but there are many techniques which can help you manage it better. So, the myth that ‘you just have to live with the pain’, is also just not true.

Myth #4

One classic myth is the ‘I’ll get addicted to the pain relief medicine‘. However, GP’s start your pain relief with a conservative approach by prescribing non-opioid pain-relief medicines which are in no way addictive. Physical dependence is not the same thing as addiction. And, physical dependence isn’t a problem as long as you do not stop taking the pain relief suddenly. Addiction is rarely a problem unless you have a history of drug or alcohol addiction.

Myth #5

You went to that event yesterday, so you can’t be in that much pain‘. Just because someone is in chronic pain doesn’t mean that they have the same amount of pain all the time.  It’s quite possible to feel good enough one day to make it to that concert, and then the next day be in so much pain you can’t make it out of bed. It’s also possible to push through the pain long enough to go to that concert that you’ve always wanted to attend, knowing that you’ll pay for it later with even worse pain for days.

Myth #6

‘You look amazing so how can you be in pain’. This is a similar myth to number 5 and one that many people with #fibromyalgia (in particular) are told this. Why would you not want to look your best when you go out whether you are in pain or not and just because you have made an effort to look good does not mean you are lying about how you feel.

Myth #7

‘You can injure yourself further if you exercise when in pain’, This could not be further from the truth, as exercise such as physical therapy can be key to successful rehabilitation.

Myth #8

Pain Pathways point out how people say when people hear ‘chronic pain’ and have never suffered through it, they tend to think it’s as easy as popping a couple of painkillers and taking it easy for a few days. However, that is not the case at all. Chronic pain differs from other types of pain in that it’s not as easily treated. For someone with chronic pain, suggesting they take a Paracetamol is similar to telling someone to put a bandaid on a deep gash – pointless and ineffective. 

While medication can definitely assist in treating chronic pain, it is that bandaid approach that is highly unsustainable in the long-term. This is because the body slowly builds up a tolerance to medication, leading patients to need more and more as treatment progresses.

Myth #9

It’s more painful than acute pain. When people hear the term ‘chronic pain’, they often make the mistake of thinking it’s more severe or painful than acute pain. But just because a pain has been identified as chronic (by lasting more than 3 months) it does not mean it’s inherently more painful; it just means that it needs different pain management and treatment approaches.

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IT’S SLEEP SUNDAY – LET’S TALK ABOUT SLEEP PROBLEMS & FIBROMYALGIA…

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Let’s talk about the sleep problems most Fibromyalgia patients suffer from ( including me).

The Sleep Foundation say that for people with fibromyalgia, the combination of pain and sleep disturbance is a double-edged sword: the pain makes sleep more difficult and sleep deprivation exacerbates pain. The good news is that reduction in sleep disturbance is usually followed by improvement in pain symptoms. This also highlights the importance of healthy sleep and to find a sleep professional in treating this disease.

Medical researchers have long sought to clarify the association between sleep disturbance and pain. Very little is known but a few key findings indicate that sleep and pain are intricately linked. For example, studies of patients experiencing pain after surgery show disturbed sleep, reduced rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, and a normalization of sleep as recovery proceeds. People with fibromyalgia may also experience an alteration…

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WHY YOU MIGHT HAVE EXPERIENCED MORE BACK PAIN DURING THE LOCKDOWN…

The Metro wrote that a third of people in the UK have experienced more pain during lockdown, according to a new study. The research, conducted by Nurofen, found that since we have been spending more time at home, more people have been experiencing backaches (36%), headaches (34%), joint pains (27%), neck aches (26%) and muscle aches (24%).

The researchers suggest that is caused by an unexpected pain paradox associated with the perceived ‘benefits’ that come with lockdown living. But what is causing these chronic aches and pains? At the top of the list of triggers is stress – which was the main cause for 50% of people surveyed. Which comes as no surprise, because living through a global pandemic is pretty stressful to say the least.

However a number of lockdown ‘benefits’ were also listed as surprising triggers of pain. These included having more time for: Watching more TV and films (39%) Hobbies (like DIY and gardening) (21%) Looking after children (12%) Exercise and fitness (16%) Whilst lockdown enabled people to spend more time at home with their families, this may have increased pain suffering as 12% of respondents attributed new discomfort to increased childcare hours.  Younger people (aged 25-44) said they experienced more back pains and headaches, in comparison to those over 45, says The Metro.

This age group were also more likely to claim that their increased pain was caused by a poor work from home set up and more time looking after their children; perhaps as a result of juggling work with home schooling. On top of this, 50% of all respondents claimed stress was a key factor in their increased pain, which might have been a reflection of the lockdown climate. DIY and gardening, which may have been a result of new found leisure time was cited by more than a fifth (21%) as causing more acute pain. 39% believe the increased time spent in front of TVs, computers or laptops has been causing their pain. In fact, more screen time may also have had other consequences, with 35% believing changing sleep patterns and 33% thought less physical activity also worsened their pain. Some people used the new time gained to improve their health and fitness during lockdown, but this may have led to further pain as 16% of respondents felt exercise had increased their aches.

The survey also found that 60% of people want more advice on how to deal with pain, and 39% have not relied on any sources of information to help manage their pain – turning to GPs and pharmacists for help has decreased. To avoid making lockdown more painful and allow people to enjoy their pastimes, The researchers are now urging people to follow NHS advice and have developed the ‘Three P’s of Pain Management’ to help people take action when pain strikes. Proactivity – Be proactive, don’t let acute pain persist Identify pain triggers and address them. Be conscious of your pain and take action. Pain Relief – take positive steps to find a solution that works for you. And finally Prevention – help to avoid future pain occurring

Source : The Metro