FREE BOOK PROMOTION ON COMPLIMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE THERAPIES FOR PAIN…

I am running a FREE Kindle Book promotion of my book Complimentary & Alternative Therapies for Pain on Amazon from 15th December – 19th December.

I am planning on writing book 2 on this subject in 2019. I want to add more therapies and include different types of pain relief to book 2 but I would love you to review my book and comment on either Amazon or on my blog with any subjects or ideas you think I should include in my second book.

https://amzn.to/2C8fzjv

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COMPLEMENTARY THERAPIES FOR BACK PAIN AND FIBROMYALGIA…

Complementary Therapies for back pain and #fibromyalgia is now available in a number of different ways.

It is important to remember that relief of chronic pain rarely occurs overnight; the healing process takes time, commitment, and an investment by the individual experiencing the pain as well as by the medical and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practitioners treating it. Success in treating chronic pain is increased by the use of an integrative approach.

Complementary therapies (‘alternative’, ‘traditional’ or ‘holistic’ therapies) often claim to treat the whole person, rather than the symptom of the disease. You can, of course, get a few treatments on the NHS via the Pain clinics, but the waiting list is long but well worth getting onto. Some of the treatments available on the NHS are homoeopathy, herbal medicine, reflexology, acupuncture, nutrition, shiatsu massage and aromatherapy.

According to the NHS website on Complementary Therapies  – to understand whether a treatment is safe and effective, we need to check the evidence.

You can learn more about the evidence for particular CAMs by reading about individual types of treatment – see their index for a list of all conditions and treatments covered by NHS Choices.

Some complementary and alternative medicines or treatments are based on principles and an evidence base that is not recognised by the majority of independent scientists.

Others have been proven to work for a limited number of health conditions. For example, there is evidence that osteopathy and chiropractic are effective for treating lower back pain.

When a person uses any health treatment – including a CAM – and experiences an improvement, this may be due to the placebo effect.

You can also get some of these treatments from your nearest training college for a quarter of the price of normal salons. There are also a number of voucher companies online that offer discounts in your area for a number of treatments which include spas and beauty treatments.

Our doctors and health services are overstretched as it is whereas most alternative practitioners have time to explore our problems in a bit more depth.

They should never be considered as a replacement for conventional medicine, but the two can certainly go hand in hand. Some treatments are far from ‘new’ with documentation on aromatherapy dating back to 3000 B.C.E.

With so many people now trying out complementary therapies and natural remedies, it’s important that you find out that they are fully qualified.

The Complementary and Natural Healthcare Council’s register has practitioners who meet the standards of proficiency for their field. They must also hold professional indemnity insurance, have no criminal record and agree to abide by a code of conduct.

 

FLOWER THERAPY FOR THE LATEST ‘HAPPY HIT’…

Seasonal changes can affect people in different ways, with some feeling quite blue and low. However, the latest ‘Happy Hit’ is available in the form of flowers.

Flower Sense has been created to serve the growing natural health community and is committed to increasing the awareness of the remarkable healing properties of flower remedies. They explain that ‘flower essences are energy remedies. Their action is not physical but works on the subtle body which of course may act on the physical. Their effects may vary for different individuals.’ Flower sense is founded by Clare Harvey, internationally known author of authoritative books on Flower Essences.

Chris Phillips from Flower Therapy UK is an experienced flower essence therapist who has worked with flower essences both personally and professionally over the last 30 years. Chris specialises in working with clients to uncover their individual blockages or imbalances, tailoring the programme of therapy to each person’s unique needs. Chris says ‘Flower essence therapy is the practice of using flower essences to restore balance between mind, body and spirit. Flower essences work by tackling the emotional and mental states which are often at the root of, or strong contributing factors in, most types of illness.’ 

Chris has also written a book ‘Treating Depression Naturally: How Flower Essences Can Rebalance Your Life’,  Flower essences can tackle the emotional and mental blockages that often lie at the root of illness. First popularised as a holistic treatment by Dr Edward Bach, creator of the popular Rescue Remedy, flower remedies are used by millions of people daily. Chris Phillips, a flower essence therapist with over thirty years experience, incorporates Bach’s and other flower essence systems in this helpful handbook, allowing you to tailor treatments to your unique needs and circumstances. Packed with insight, inspiration and real-life stories, Treating Depression Naturally offers a new way of thinking about and managing your anxiety and depression.

WHAT ARE COMPLIMENTARY THERAPIES?…

Complementary therapies (‘alternative’, ‘traditional’ or ‘holistic’ therapies) often claim to treat the whole person, rather than the symptom of the disease. You can of course get a few treatments on the NHS via the Pain clinics, but the waiting list is long but well worth getting onto. Some of the treatments available on the NHS are homeopathy, herbal medicine, reflexology, acupuncture, nutrition, shiatsu massage and aromatherapy.

According to the NHS website on Complimentary Therapies  – to understand whether a treatment is safe and effective, we need to check the evidence.

You can learn more about the evidence for particular CAMs by reading about individual types of treatment – see their index for a list of all conditions and treatments covered by NHS Choices.

Some complementary and alternative medicines or treatments are based on principles and an evidence base that are not recognised by the majority of independent scientists.

Others have been proven to work for a limited number of health conditions. For example, there is evidence that osteopathy and chiropractic are effective for treating lower back pain.

When a person uses any health treatment – including a CAM – and experiences an improvement, this may be due to the placebo effect.

You can also get some of these treatments from your nearest training college for a quarter of the price of normal salons. Other treatments available at college’s are pedicures, manicures, waxes which are certainly treatments I can no longer do myself.

You can also a number of voucher companies online that offer discounts in your area for a number of treatments which include spa’s and beauty treatments.

Our doctors and health services are overstretched as it is whereas most alternative practitioners have time to explore our problems in a bit more depth.

They should never be considered as a replacement for conventional medicine, but the two can certainly go hand in hand. Some treatments are far from ‘new’ with documentation on aromatherapy dating back to 3000 B.C.E.

With so many people now trying out complementary and natural remedies, it’s important that you find out that they are fully qualified.

The Complementary and Natural Healthcare Council’s register, has practitioners who meet the standards of proficiency for their field. They must also hold professional indemnity insurance, have no criminal record and agree to abide by a code of conduct.

 

 

TOP THREE COMPLIMENTARY & ALTERNATIVE THERAPIES FOR PAIN…

Therapy book

In my book ‘Complimentary & Alternative Therapies for Pain’I cover over 50 treatments that are available for pain relief but some of the top choices are –

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  1. Aromatherapy – According to Mary Margaret Chappell in an article in ‘Arthritis Today’, recent studies “corroborate the use of aromatherapy for pain relief”. Apparently “Aromatherapy is effective because it works directly on the amygdala, the brain’s emotional centre,” says Mehmet Oz MD, professor of surgery at Columbia University Medical Centre in New York City. “This has important consequences because the thinking part of the brain can’t inhibit the effects of the scent, meaning you feel them instantaneously”. It is a method of healing using highly concentrated plant oils called ‘essential oils’ that are often highly aromatic and are extracted from plants. Alan Hirsch MD, neurologist at the Smell and Taste Treatment and Research Foundation in Chicago, believes you don’t have to limit yourself to essential oils. Limiting the length of your exposure to certain scents however, will ensure they remain effective. “Short-term exposure is key because people stop responding to scents after a few minutes”.
  2. Acupuncture – A UK trial showed patients who received ten acupuncture sessions were far more likely to be pain-free after two years than those who didn’t. An American study saw 60% of back pain sufferers experience a significant improvement after acupuncture. The word “acupuncture” means “needle piercing”. It is a traditional Chinese medical treatment using very fine needles, which are inserted into the skin at any of the 800 specially-designated points. It originated from a Dutch physician, William Ten Rhyne, who had been living in Japan during the latter part of the 17th century and it was he who introduced it to Europe. It works by manipulating the body’s energy flow, or Chi, to help the body to balance and heal itself. Legend has it that acupuncture was developed when it was seen that soldiers who recovered from arrow wounds were sometimes also healed of other diseases from which they were suffering. Acupuncture-300x232
  3. Meditation – Many people are turning to meditation as an effective way to relax and bring inner peace. It can also help with stress, improve your general health and help you to think clearly. It’s something you can do wherever you are, by focusing on something else around you instead of your thoughts, worries and obsessions. You can meditate just by focusing on something; anything will do if you are out. But most people still meditate on breathing, a single repeated word, a flower or a mental image. Meditation is much more than just a way of relaxing, it also clears our minds and makes us more alert. If you meditate for a few minutes each day, the results can be deep and long-lasting. There are many places you can learn to meditate; it could be a candle-lit room, with incense and dreamy music, lying on the floor after a yoga class or at an evening’s class at your local school or leisure centre. images-1