CBD FOR PAIN RELIEF AND ITS HEALTH BENEFITS…

Marijuana has been a taboo subject for a long time. People refuse to legalise it because they fear it might cause substance abuse in others. Unfortunately, people are getting addicted to it, but the drug itself is not as dangerous as heroin or cocaine. With enough research and studies, scientists discovered that weed can be used to ease pain in people. This quality makes CBD an appealing option for those who are looking for relief from pain and other symptoms without the mind-altering effects of marijuana or certain pharmaceutical drugs.

Doctors are prescribing medicinal marijuana in countries where the drug is legal. Not only that, the extract from the herb is used to create CBD oil that is also efficient against pain. Studies have shown that the oil is beneficial against pain. Many studies suggest CBD may activate a system called the endocannabinoid system, which provides relief from the symptoms the patient is experiencing.

Click on this link for more ways on how to use the oil to manage pain, https://www.cbdmethods.com/cbd-for-pain-relief/

Moreover, some people choose to try different treatment for their pain. They’re just not comfortable with any products that is associated with weed. They’re not to blame either. But if you don’t have anything against the drug, then you should try CBD oil for your pain. There is lots of online research to read about other people’s experiences with the oil. Since medicinal marijuana can ease pain, then the oil should be able to do the same thing.

CBD oil can help with a number of conditions including cancer, headaches, IBS, to name a few.

Its far from a cure for cancer, but at least it can ease some of the symptoms in a patient. Radiation causes the patient to vomit and feel nauseated all the time. CBD oil can help reduce the nausea. They suggest you take a drop of CBD oil and hold it under your tongue. This way the substance is properly absorbed in the mouth. Then you can proceed to swallow the liquid. The effect of the oil will not be as good if swallowed directly, that’s why you should follow this step carefully so that you can eliminate all the negative symptoms from the body. This process can be repeated a couple of times during the week but before trying it you should always ask your doctor first.

Headaches are a regular part of our lives. We all know that they can cause incredible frustration and moodiness. Pain in the head can prevent us from doing our daily tasks. That’s where CBD oil comes in handy. It can even be more functional than other medications as it reduces inflammation that causes the headache in the first place.

Another important thing that you should remember is take the oil regularly. This is the only way that it will prove effective. Every time you have a headache you can take the oil in a capsule and let the liquid work its magic. The oil doesn’t cause any negative symptoms, unlike other medications that can cause dizziness and fatigue.

People that suffer from irritable bowel syndrome know that the disease can be a huge inconvenience. Taking the oil can reduce some of the symptoms of IBS. This means that you won’t get bloated as often and you should be able to rest better as well. The only way that this can be effective for IBS is by smoking or vaping the oil. First and foremost you need to start with an oil that has a lower concentration of CBD, then work your way through it. Your body needs to adjust to the change after vaping the oil. With time you can use a liquid with a higher consistency of CBD.

Furthermore, you should be able to notice a difference with time but have patience as nothing works right from the start. You need to take your time with the oil as with any medication prescribed. Always remember to see your Doctor first before trying any new type of treatment. Make sure that you follow the instructions of the doctor carefully so that the end result can be satisfactory.

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CAN LONG TERM USE OF OPIOIDS CAUSE RESPIRATORY PROBLEMS AND IS IT TIME FOR A CHANGE…

Can long term use of opioids cause respiratory problems and is it time for a change?

The straight answer is ‘yes’, according to Desert Home Treatment who say that ‘ The long-term effects of opioids on the bowels are significant, but it is the damage they do to the respiratory system that is behind most of the overdoses and fatalities that are related to opioid use. As opioids depress the central nervous system, they directly interfere with the body’s breathing mechanisms.’

Science Daily pointed out that ‘ Opioids are highly effective at killing pain, but they can also kill people by depressing their breathing and at the same time sedating them so that it can be impossible for them to wake up from oxygen deprivation,” says Richard Horner, a professor in the departments of Medicine and Physiology.’

Most pain killers opioids or otherwise can cause side effects but they tend to improve shortly after starting the treatment or following an intended dose increase. The most common side effect being constipation and itching but a respiratory problem is feared by many. They say it is mostly a concern in acute pain management where patients have not developed tolerance.

So should we be right to be sceptical about taking opioids for long term pain when they keep appearing in the news as sceptical ? Drug Abuse has written a great article on a ‘Need for Change’ with a list of 10 opiate alternatives. They include –

Over-the-Counter Acetaminophen

Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs)

Cortiosteroids

Serotonin and Norephinephrine

Reuptake Inhibitors

Neurostimulators

Anticonvulsants

Injections

Physical Therapy Massage, Acupuncture and Chiropractic Care

Exercise

It’s certainly something to ponder about.

 

DEALING WITH DEPRESSION WITH CHRONIC PAIN …

Depression is quite common with people suffering from chronic pain. I mean who wouldn’t feel a bit low when trying to cope with constant pain but there is help out there to deal with this type of depression. Research shows that some of these antidepressants may help with some kinds of long-lasting pain.

Web MD state that Doctors don’t know exactly why antidepressants help with pain. They may affect chemicals in your spinal cord — you may hear them called neurotransmitters — that send pain signals to your brain. 

It’s important to note that antidepressantsdon’t work on pain right away. It can be a week or so before you feel any better. In fact, you may not get their full effect for several weeks.

After my second spinal surgery I was put on a very low dose of an antidepressant which I took over a period of 20+years. I am still on this antidepressant ( Prozac) even though over the many years I haven taken it there have been numerous articles on the pros and cons of taking it for so long. In fact, only last year the Professor of Medicine whom I call my Medicine Man who I see on a regular basis, suggested that maybe I should stop taking it.

I started with reducing it to one every other day and had no ill effects except that I wasn’t feeling as perky as I usually am. I put it down to the fact that at that time last year I ways constantly going back and forth to stay at my Dads so that I could go and be with him in hospital. He was in three months and my sister and I would do three week shifts of going in for most of the day over a period of three weeks then coming home for a rest. Sadly Dad passed away in hospital by which stage I had already started increasing my drug to nearly what I had been on before as I had an even bigger reason for feeling low.

On the NHS website they say that even though a type of antidepressant called tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) weren’t originally designed to be painkillers, there’s evidence to suggest they’re effective in treating chronic (long-term) nerve pain in some people.

Chronic nerve pain, also known as neuropathic pain, is caused by nerve damage or other problems with the nerves, and is often unresponsive to regular painkillers, such as paracetamol.

Amitriptyline is a TCA that’s usually used to treat neuropathic pain. I also take this for my neuropathic pain and it also helps me to sleep better.

We are all different and try to deal with chronic pain, stress and even loss in different ways but for me personally I felt this one little pill I took every morning worked for me. When I went back for my review with my Medicine Man I told him what I had been through and said I felt for me personally it was one drug I would like to continue taking indefinitely if he felt that was safe. He said that every single person will have different views and reactions to different types of antidepressants but if I had found one that I truly felt helped me ‘feel good’ every day no matter what I was going through then he was happy for me to take it indefinitely.

I know there are lots and lots of alternative things to try for any type of depression from Cognitive Behavioural Therapy to Group Therapy and much more but I do feel that some people are nervous of taking medication on a long term basis but if that works for you, then why not.

Try everything that is available to you and when you find something that works for you then stick with it even it is taking a daily dose of medication. Feeling low and depressed is awful and most people in chronic pain must feel that at some stage but life really is to short to feel that way on a daily basis so why not try something just for you to help you feel better on the outside even if the pain on the inside is still there.

Some great websites and organisations that can help with chronic pain and depression are Away With Pain.

BLB Solicitors have a long list with links to UK support and help with depression from pain. The NHS also has details on Cognitive Behavioural Therapy in the UK and how to find a therapist.

11 TOP TIPS TO HELP YOU COPE WITH THE SYMPTOMS OF FIBROMYALGIA…

1. If at all possible try to de-stress as apparently stress may trigger Fibromyalgia Symptoms. Some of the best de-stress treatments you could try are yoga, exercise, sleep and meditation.

2. ‘Fibro Fog’ is a common ailment of Fibromyalgia so rather than getting frustrated that your short-term memory has let you down, try and get into the habit of jotting things down on paper on a daily basis,

3. Exercise, as in low-intensity exercise like walking, or warm water exercise is great for helping the pain of Fibromyalgia. This type of exercise can decrease pain and stiffness.

4. Have a long soak in a warm bath or hot tub as this has been proven to relax tense muscles which will then reduce pain.

5. Try to use decaf as caffeine can increase anxiety and insomnia, so watch your intake of chocolate, coffee, teas and some soft drinks.

6. Also, try and make some ‘me time’ for yourself every day as part of your treatment.

7. Make your work life balance work for you. If work is leaving you exhausted and in pain then design a flexible plan that works better for you and your boss. Maybe try some products like a telephone headset or keyboard tray.

8. Talk about your Fibromyalgia with your family and those around you. Let them know what can trigger it or make it worse. Never be afraid to ask for help from either your friends, family or other Fibro sufferers or a counsellor.

9. Many people call Fibro the ‘invisible illness’, as you can look find be feeling awful. So, when arranging your social life be prepared to say ‘no’ to something if you know it will be too much for you.

10. Try and keep a journal so that you can see what can trigger off an attack, then you can do something about it.

11. Join a support group, be it in person or online, they offer a place to talk to others who share your problems.

ALL YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT A SLIPPED DISC – A BRILLIANT GUEST POST BY NEIL VELLEMAN…

A slipped disc? Ouch! 

 By Neil Velleman, of Atkins Physiotherapy Consultants

A slipped or herniated disc is amongst the most debilitating of back pain problems – sometimes with added symptoms such as the grinding leg pain of sciatica.  There are many levels of back and neck pain but a herniated or ‘slipped’ disc is one of the most painful and it can cause long-term immobility if it’s not treated correctly.

This is a condition where the centre of a spinal disc bulges outwards and presses onto a nerve.  The spinal discs act as shock absorbers and through a variety of causes, including injury, poor posture and general “wear and tear” (meaning gradual deterioration), the walls of the disc can become weaker. If the centre of the disc pushes out, this can cause the disc wall to bulge and that can be when pain strikes!

There are six steps of management to consider in this situation:

1) Pain Killers

2) Manual therapy

3) IDD Therapy

4) Injections

5) Surgery

6) Other options including exercise and acupuncture

Pain Killers

When you have a disc problem or simple back pain, the first thing the NHS recommends is to take some anti-inflammatories such as ibuprofen.  Relieving pain is the first step to being able to move, because if you can move, the mechanisms which keep our backs healthy can operate.

This will be what your GP will recommend because in approximately 90% of cases, back pain resolves within six weeks.  But if the pain isn’t going away or it is so severe that you can’t carry out your normal functions, then some form of manual therapy is advisable.

Manual Therapy

There are a variety of types of therapy and we typically think of physiotherapy, osteopathy and chiropractic.  Where there is pain, the body usually limits how we move – it hurts!

Some conditions have built up over time leaving the spine stiff and unable to move properly.  This can put tremendous pressure on the discs.  So generally speaking manual therapists will seek to ease muscle spasm and then, through either some manual mobilisation or manipulation, free the joints which may be stuck They will also look at how our bodies are moving.

This is where we consider the “cause”; what led the disc wall to get weak?  Often some gentle stretches and exercises can help to get movement back, all with the goal to help the body heal itself. Typically, four to six sessions are enough, although you may need to additional exercise sessions.

IDD Therapy

IDD Therapy is the next step when manual therapy and exercise alone aren’t enough.  IDD Therapy is a computer-controlled treatment which helps physiotherapists to decompress the specific spinal segment where the disc is “slipped” or herniated.  Patients lie on a treatment couch where they are connected to a machine with a pelvic harness and a chest harness.

The IDD Therapy machine then applies a gentle pulling force at a precise angle to take pressure off the targeted disc and to gently mobilise the joint and surrounding muscles.  The goal with IDD Therapy is to relieve muscle spasm, reduce or reverse disc bulging and gently stretch the tissues to free the movement in the spine.  As pain subsides therapists use gentle exercise and possibly some manual therapy to strengthen the back or neck to help avoid a recurrence.

Patients typically have a programme of IDD Therapy and long-term problems can need 20 sessions over a six-to-eight week period.  IDD Therapy is still relatively new to the UK but there is a network of providers around the country.

Injections

Injections are quite controversial because until recently they have been given widely to people with long term disc problems.  When a patient has a slipped disc and pain, there can be inflammation in the area.  This inflammation can cause pain on its own.

There are different injections, but a steroid injection with or without some local anaesthetic may be given to reduce the inflammation.  Injections can provide temporary relief with the goal to create a window of pain relief where the body can move or where therapists can work with a patient to address the causes of the problem.

The controversy about the effectiveness of injections is because injections do not address the causes of the problem. They can address inflammation but a slipped or bulging disc will still be bulging after the injection.  Hence the question of whether injections really help or not, and why many NHS trusts are scaling back the availability of injections as the cost/benefit is not clear.

Surgery

Spinal surgery can be a very important step for patients with a slipped disc which has not responded to any of the treatments described.  This is particularly the case if the disc is putting pressure on nerves to such an extent that it causes weakness in the legs or arms, or in very severe cases, if a slipped disc puts pressure on the spinal cord and affects our bowel or bladder control, then emergency surgery can be essential.

The most common surgery for a slipped disc is a “microdiscectomy”.  If the disc material is stubbornly pressing on a nerve, the offending disc material may be cut out surgically and removed.  Such surgery is commonly given for leg pain (sciatica) where the disc is pressing on the sciatic nerve and the pain is intolerable.

Surgery can remove the pain immediately.  However, it is not without risks and surgery does not address the causes which led to the weakness in the first place.  Thus, some patients can get complete relief whilst others the pain may remain or even get worse.

Generally, surgeons will operate as a last resort and it can be advisable to get a second opinion before embarking on surgery.

Other treatments

Yoga and Pilates can be helpful in maintaining your body once you resolve the pain. It is important to find a teacher who suits you and understands your condition.

We hear a lot about “core muscles” and whilst there is some debate about how important our core is, generally the more our muscles can support our spines and move freely, the better our discs are protected.

Acupuncture can relieve muscle spasm and back pain, though for a slipped disc it would work best in conjunction with manual therapy and IDD Therapy rather than as a stand-alone treatment.

What next for slipped discs?

We are potentially going to see more slipped discs because generally, people are less active than they used to be and spend a lot more time sitting.  Discs hate to be squashed!

There is a general move in healthcare away from invasive treatments such as injections and surgery, and the emergence of treatments like IDD Therapy, which has replaced traction, means that, combined with increased knowledge about the spine and exercise, we can keep more people on the non-invasive side of spine care.

If the pain is persisting longer than six weeks, I would advise seeing a professional who works with spines, just to make sure that something short term doesn’t progress into something more debilitating and long term.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Neil Velleman is a backpain expert, IDD Therapy provider and owner of Atkins Physiotherapy Consultants in Essex.

 ‘Intervertebral Differential Dynamics” or IDD Therapy is the fastest growing non-surgical spinal treatment for intervertebral discs with over 1,000 clinics worldwide and 34 clinics across the UK. Safe, gentle and non-invasive, IDD Therapy helps patients who need something more for their pain when manual therapy alone is insufficient to achieve lasting pain relief. http://iddtherapy.co.uk/

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