FINDING A MEDITATION TO SUIT YOU…

While waiting to go into the Doctors I sat reading a Good Housekeeping Health Living magazine. It had a brilliant article on finding the right type of meditation to suit your mood. These are some of the tips to help you find the techniques that work best for you.

  • If you need flexibility then look at the apps that are available for help with all kinds of needs from performance to sleep. They recommend Headspace or Happier and Calm apps.
  • Headspace also runs bite-size guided meditations for anyone who is busy (who isn’t?) All you do is sign up for a free trial at Headspace or you could find meditation courses online but they state they can be expensive from
  • If you are having trouble sleeping (that’s me) then they say there is evidence that mindfulness works. The technique that has the most mental health studies supporting it is mindfulness-based ‘Cognitive Therapy‘, and there is an abundance of details online.
  • If you prefer to be taught personally then they recommend Vedic and Transcendental Meditation which are courses you can start with a one-to-one lesson when you’re given your mantra. Find Vedic and Transcendental Meditation from this website.
  • If your feeling angry or lonely then they suggest you try loving-kindness meditation, where you repeat a positive mantra. Visit Ten Percent Happier for details on this.

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6 WAYS TO CREATE CALM IN YOUR BODY…

6 ways to create calm in your body will help you sleep and feel better from the inside.

  • Your jaw can carry stress which then radiates to your head and neck. Some people even grind their teeth.  Loosen that tension by opening your mouth wide for half a minute, and breath naturally through your nose, then allow your mouth to gently close.
  • Download an app which has guided meditation like Headspace or Buddhify which give you a helping hand when you are feeling overwhelmed.
  • Create your own mantra, your personal mantra should be something to inspire you and motivate you. If you can’t think of one for yourself, there are lots to choose from online.
  • Relax your face by turning your head to gently look over one shoulder and then the other shoulder then gently tilt your head back just for a few seconds.
  • Listen to a beautiful piece of music, as studies have shown that slow music with a 10-second repetitive cycle can be very relaxing. They say it syncs with your blood pressure rhythm.
  • Go for a walk. It’s easy to stay inside and not bother but walking can boost circulation and leaves you feeling more relaxed. It also helps you to sleep better.

4 REASONS WHY RUNNING A HOT BATH IS LIKE A BREATH OF FRESH AIR…

We all have busy lifestyles now and the majority of us tend to jump in the shower first in the morning and having a bath is at the bottom of your list. When was the last time you enjoyed a good soak in the bath? I am ashamed to say it’s years for me as I love my shower but when I move house I am going to change all that.

Here are 4 reasons why running a hot bath for yourself could make you feel more relaxed and calmer, just like a breath of fresh air.

  1. It will help you to wind down before you go to sleep. They reckon that a warm bath an hour before you go to help will help you go to sleep and Epsom salt and lavender oil (five drops) will help you along your way.
  2. A quick bath can totally transform you by adding just a few drops of bath oils to soften your skin, lie with a face sheet mask warmed up in the water across your face and pop a mask on your hair. After a short while when you remove your mask from your hair and face your face and body will feel transformed.
  3. Soothe your dry skin by adding a handful of oats in your bath with a spoonful of raw honey as they are great at hydrating your skin. They say don’t soak for longer than 20 minutes and use a soap-free body wash to finish and a fragrance-free moisturiser.
  4. A bath can not only help you wind down but it can also help to pep your mood up, it’s what you add to the water that makes all the difference. Uplifting grapefruit essential oils wakes up the senses. Mix eight to 10 drops with a few tablespoons of almond oil to ensure it disperses into the water. Remember to not have your water too hot as this will make you sleepy.

OSTEOPATHY TREATMENT FOR A BAD BACK …

Osteopathy is an alternative medical technique that uses manipulation and massage to help distressed muscles and joints, to help them work smoothly.

Treatment can improve many parts of the body by restoring normal movement in areas that have become dysfunctional. This can then allow the tissue to nourish, replenish and repair in a more natural way.

The treatment first began in 1892 when a Dr. Andrew Taylor Still (1828-1917), an American farmer, inventor and doctor, opened the first school of osteopathic medicine in the USA. He looked for alternatives to medical treatments in his day which he felt were ineffective as well as harmful.

His new philosophy of medicine was based on the teachings of Hippocrates. The therapy aims to pinpoint and treat any problems that are of a mechanical nature. Our body’s frame consists of the skeleton, muscles, joints and ligaments and all movements or activities such as running, swimming, eating, speaking and walking depend on it.

When you first see an Osteopath, (they were my first port of call when my back went wrong ) he or she will need to know the complete history of any problems you have, how they first occurred and what eases or aggravates matters, so a diary kept over a week or more before your visit would be a great help.

Osteopathy is a way of detecting, treating and preventing health problems by moving, stretching and massaging a person’s muscles and joints. It is based on the principle that the well-being of an individual depends on their bones, muscles, ligaments and connective tissue functioning smoothly together.

Osteopaths believe their treatments allow the body to heal itself. In my younger years I had a great Osteopath. I would go in and see him bent to one side and I would leave him straight. He kept me off the operating table for a number of years.