‘KRIOTHERAPY’, THE LATEST FEEL-GOOD THERAPY FOR FIBROMYALGIA AND MUSCULAR PAINS…

Kriotherapy (sometimes spelled Cryotherapy) is the latest feel-good therapy which has apparently been known to heal muscular injuries, chronic aches and pains, help alleviate arthritis, and boost circulation, the immune system, and help fatigue, insomnia and the central nervous system !!

It involves spending two to three minutes at a temperature between -60C and -135C depending on your size and fitness level. It is stated that it is not suitable for people who suffer from claustrophobia and no-one should undertake it until a full medical history has been taken.

You are put in front of a fan to dry out your body thoroughly then put into a cabinet where the dry ice begins to seep in while you acclimatise to the -60C, then another door opens and where you are in a -135C atmosphere. After three minutes you are put through paces to help the released blood (which is sent out to protect vital organs in freezing temperatures) surge through your body, with ten minutes on the treadmill, an exercise bike and exercises.

The fact that you are cold, then warm apparently makes the blood swirl into action to help heal.

 

According to an article in Treatwell, writer Charlotte wrote about the treatment at Champneys Health Spa in Tring.

“Instead of trying out the usual Massage or Facial, we decided to test something different in the name of health & wellness – Kriotherapy. Becoming human ice-cubes doesn’t sound too appealing but in the end we had the most fun we’ve had in ages, and left with the softest skin we’ve ever had.

The Venue

The fountain outside made us immediately unwind (and so did the complimentary fruit juice), and the smell of Elemis products got us in the mood for some pampering right away. Walking through the corridors, Champneys Tring is full of things to do and offers a homely feel even though you’re wearing your robes in front of complete strangers. You’re welcomed the very second you step through the door and everyone offers a polite ‘Hello’, even the guests!

The Treatment

Kriotherapy isn’t a treatment for the faint-hearted or the fashion-conscious. We didn’t walk around in our designer bikini, rather some very attractive shorts, a crop top and some clogs (don’t say we didn’t warn you…), but it’s supposed to be a brilliant therapy for those with sports injuries or who suffer from depression, fatigue, psoriasis and insomnia.

The qualified cryotherapist, Renata, gave us a brief examination, taking our pulse and blood pressure to make sure we were fit enough to handle the freezing chambers. If you have high or low blood pressure, diabetes, epilepsy, heart conditions, or are claustrophobic – it’s best you steer clear from the thrilling treatment. Renata then handed us our outfit – if you’re a fashionista who would never be seen dead in a white woolly crop-top, Kriotherapy might not be your favourite treatment! We wore two pairs of white shorts, two crop-tops, two sets of white hockey socks, and a headband to protect our ears from frostbite (eek). Then Renata told us to make fists with our hands whilst she covered them with gloves and tugged on some bandages over our elbows and knees.

We started to get a little nervous once we were dressed up, but Renata ensured us it was all for our safety. We also stood in front of a fan for a few seconds to dry any perspiration or water lingering on our skin, to ensure any water didn’t freeze and burn our skin inside the chambers.

Once we’d fixed a mask over our nose and mouth and all our extremities were covered up we were led into the first chamber, which is at a chilly -60c. After 30 seconds of acclimatising we jumped straight into the second chamber, which sits at a very frosty -135c. Squealing and laughing, we spent the next 3 minutes marching in circles, jumping up and down, laughing, giggling, anything we could do to keep warm in the freezing temperatures. Renata stood in the warmth holding a timer so we knew how long we had left, and held her thumbs up as we counted down the last 10 seconds between giggles.

After tumbling out of the chamber, we cycled on an exercise bike for a couple of minutes, then spent 15 minutes on a Powerplate to get the circulation going and our rosy body back to its usual colour. Whoever said feeling great didn’t require a bit of hard work?

The Result

Whilst we felt a little embarrassed in our outfit, the treatment itself made our skin feel the softest it’s ever felt and those big gulps of freezing air did wonders for our breathing. Any aches and pains we had previously had gone and we were left excited for a good night’s sleep later. We had been nervous about the freezing chambers, but Renata put our mind at ease and we ended up giggling throughout the whole thing.”

I’m not sure if I’d fancy this and wonder if ice packs, followed by warm packs, would hit the spot just the same? I think I would rather have another type of treatment at this amazing Spa in Tring.

 

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WALK TO WORK WEEK – 13th – 17th MAY…

Walking to WOrk

Between 13-17 May 2013 employees are encouraged to leave their cars at home and put national transport aside to get your blood pumping and get fit.

Walking is a great way to stay trim and helps keep your heart healthy.

It saves on petrol and bus fares, and is better for our planet.

It’s easy to fit some more walking in to your working week. Whether it’s making changes to how you travel to work, or getting out more at lunchtimes, Living Streets can help.

We’re all sat at our desks long enough, so why not take the chance to stretch our legs, get fit and burn out the carbon footprint all in one go?

Many of the best writers including Charles Dickens and Wordsworth went on walks to get inspiration!

For more details head to the Walking Works Website.

WHAT TO EAT TO HELP LOWER YOUR BLOOD PRESSURE…

stress

After recently finding out that I am suffering from very high blood pressure, my sons lovely partner has been reading up on how to lower it naturally. Some of them may come as a surprise to you.

Hibiscus tea commonly consumed as a pleasant herbal tea in the Middle East, this one is quite effective and has been supported by several placebo-controlled trials (5). It also tastes good.
Eat fish at least three times a week
Omega-3 fatty acids have an anti-inflammatory effect which helps to support and maintain a healthy cardiovascular system. They help to maintain the flexibility of blood vessels to promote healthy blood flow and help maintain healthy blood pressure. If you don’t like fish or seafood, Blackmores’ Omega Heart is a source of concentrated omega-3 fatty acids derived from fish oil.
Bananas You probably know that eating too much salt can raise blood pressure, but most people aren’t aware of the benefits of potassium, which counters sodium’s ill effects. Most don’t get enough of this mineral.

According to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, people with hypertension may especially benefit from upping the amount of potassium in their diet. Adults should get at least 4,700 milligrams a day. A few good sources: bananas (422 milligrams each), a baked potato with skin (738 milligrams), orange juice (496 milligrams per cup), and non-fat or low-fat yoghurt (531–579 milligrams per 8 ounces).
Of course the best news of all is that dark chocolate can also help to lower your blood pressure.

Chocolate Several placebo-controlled trials have shown that dark chocolate or cocoa reduces blood pressure in people with high or even high-normal blood pressure (6, 7). Dark chocolate also appears to increase insulin sensitivity and the skin’s resistance to sunburn if eaten regularly, but that’s for another post. All effects are probably related to chocolate’s polyphenol content. I prefer plain toasted cocoa nibs because they don’t encourage overeating, but dark chocolate (70+ percent cocoa mass) also works if you’re able to include it in moderation as part of an overall healthy eating pattern. You may want to avoid eating chocolate in the evening because it can interfere with sleep.