MS AWARENESS WEEK 24th-30th APRIL 2018…

It’s Multiple Sclerosis Awareness Week on the 24th-30th April, 2018.

Multiple sclerosis is a neurological condition that affects the nerves in the brain and spinal cord. ‘Sclerosis’ means scarring or hardening of tiny patches of tissue. ‘Multiple’ is added because this happens at more than one place in the brain and/or spinal cord. MS is not a terminal condition but it is one that you will live with for the rest of your life. It isn’t infectious or contagious so you can’t pass it on to other people.

MS is the most common condition of the central nervous system affecting young adults. Over 100,000 people in the UK have MS which is about one in every 600. It is nearly three times more common in women than in men. Most people are diagnosed in their 20s and 30s but it can be diagnosed in younger and older people. Although the effects of MS can vary greatly from person to person, the condition is often categorised into one of three broad types.

There is a wide range of possible symptoms but you usually experience only a small number around the time of diagnosis and you may never experience them all. Symptoms vary from person to person and from day to day. This can make your MS rather unpredictable and can take some getting used to.

Some of the most common symptoms around the time of diagnosis are fatigue (a kind of exhaustion which is out of all proportion to the task undertaken), stumbling more than before, unusual feelings in the skin (such as pins and needles or numbness), slowed thinking or problems with eyesight.

Many of these symptoms may be invisible to other people. This may upset you if you’re feeling very unwell but others think you look OK. You may need to explain that your MS is causing difficulties, rather than assuming that others can detect this.

The MS Awareness Week is an important date on the MS Trust Charity calendar as it helps raise awareness of this debilitating condition.

To help raise awareness they have launched Be Bold in Blue campaign and a new project to help young people affected by MS, with posters and cards to help spread the word during MS Awareness Week.

Being Bold in Blue can be as simple as encouraging people to dress up in blue for a donation or getting sponsored to wear blue nail polish for the week (popular with the men!). You could even take on a really bold fundraising challenge like dying your hair blue and then shaving it all off!

  • Organise a cake sale at work and ask everyone to donate £1 to dress in blue for the day
  • Hold a Be Bold in Blue quiz night at a pub or a collection day in your local shopping centre
  • Fundraise at school by organising a sponsored silence or fun run

However you decide to Be Bold in Blue, you can be sure that the money you raise will make a real difference. Since 2011, together they have raised over £105,000 to support people with MS by providing information they can trust and training the MS health professionals they need.  Head to the website to get your Be Bold in Blue fundraising kit. 

It’s not too late to organise an event or to just Be Bold in Blue from the 24th-30th April. To celebrate MS Awareness Week they are also launching a brand new YouTube channel called MSTV for young people aged 11 to 17, who are affected by MS. The channel will feature videos to help you understand MS, you can subscribe to it on the MS Trust website. 

SAD – SEASONAL AFFECTIVE DISORDER and WALKING…

 

At this time of year, one in eight of us can suffer from winter blues and one in 50 of us suffer from SAD through lack of sunlight.

Symptoms of SAD include fatigue and depression.

It’s the sunlight that tells your brain to produce serotonin, which is needed to boost our mood and energy. Lack of it as autumn turns to winter causes an increase in the production of melatonin (which makes us sleepy) and a reduction in serotonin is what can cause depression.

One of the most obvious ways to treat SAD is to get outside in the daylight for at least 20 minutes a day but you can also invest in a lightbox. Light therapy is the most effective way of decreasing the symptoms. Also, it is believed that eating foods rich in an amino acid called tryptophan increase the amount of serotonin in the brain.

Australian research found that taking vitamin D supplements for only five days in late winter improved the mood of people with SAD. It can also prevent osteoporosis, support immunity and regulate weight. Of course, the best way to get Vitamin D is through the effects of sunlight on bare skin. Amazingly they say that Vitamin D lasts for 60 days in the body so if you’ve been away for your annual holiday in the summer, it will mean your levels should be fine until November.

Other sources of Vitamin D can be found in oily fish and eggs, cheese and poultry.

Research also suggests that eating carb-rich foods helps the brain take up tryptophan. You can also find supplements and The Food Agency recommends taking 10mcg a day.

Walking for health encourages people to get active by arranging health walks up and down the Country for all levels of fitness.

Walking will improve stamina, help keep weight gain at bay and reduce your risk of major diseases. 20 minutes of walking can burn up 100 calories.

It is also beneficial for SAD sufferers who feel low and lethargic due to the lack of sunlight in the winter months.

Walking for life was set up in 2000 and now has over 600 local schemes with 66,000 regular walkers nationwide. Over one Christmas period, walking for life registered their 100,000th walker onto their database.

 

#MS AWARENESS WEEK…

multiple-sclerosis

MS Awareness Week started April 25th – May 1st . For the latest news and updates on MS, sign up for their Newsletter ‘Open Door’. The MS Trust publishes a free quarterly newsletter called Open Door, for people with multiple sclerosis, their family and friends and supporters of the MS Trust. In addition, we circulate a range of e-newsletters connected to our work including MS research updates, news alerts, and fundraising information.

In a recent article MS they said that specialist services are facing big challenges. They said they want to shape a fair future, where everyone affected by MS can access the specialist care that works for them. This MS Awareness Week they want to highlight these challenges.

Four ways to get involved are by joining their campaign, support their work, help spread the word or be bold in blue.

Peter Panayi 5

SUPPORT SYDNEY BIKE RIDE TO HELP RAISE FUNDS FOR MS…

Fund Raising for MS

Help me support people with MS.

My son is taking part in the 2013 Gong Ride in order to raise funds for people affected by Multiple Sclerosis (MS). MS is the most common disease of the central nervous system and affects more than 23,000 Australians.

Did you know?

* The average age of diagnosis of MS typically between 20 and 40 years of age

* MS affects three times as many women as men

MS Australia aims to minimise the impact of multiple sclerosis on all individuals affected by the disease, as well as their families, carers and the community, by offering a wide range of services, equipment and support. MS Australia’s goal is to assist everyone affected by MS to live life to their fullest potential and secure the care and support they need, until we ultimately find a cure.

Every penny helps – if you would like to help him reach his goal please click this link to donate –
http://register.gongride.org.au/2013-Sydney-to-Gong-Bike-Ride/richardmclullich

Thanks

SAD – SEASONAL AFFECTIVE DISORDER…

SAD – SEASONAL AFFECTIVE DISORDER…

At this time of year one in eight of us can suffer from winter blues and one in 50 of us suffer from SAD through lack of sunlight.

Symptoms of SAD include fatigue and depression.

Its the sunlight that tells your brain to produce serotonin, which is needed to boost our mood and energy. Lack of it as autumn turns to winter causes an increase in the production of melatonin (which makes us sleepy) and a reduction in serotonin is what can cause depression.

One of the most obvious ways to treat SAD is to get outside in the daylight for at least 20 minutes a day but you can also invest in a light box. Light therapy is the most effective way of decreasing the symptoms. Also it is believed that eating foods rich in an amino acid called tryptophan increases the amount of serotonin in the brain.

Also they say that Australian research found that taking vitamin D supplements for only five days in late winter improved the mood of people with SAD. It can also prevent osteoporosis, support immunity and regulate weight. Of course the best way to get Vitamin D is through the effects of sunlight on bare skin. Amazingly they say that Vitamin D lasts for 60 days in the body so if you’ve been away for your annual holiday in the summer, it will mean your levels should be fine until November.

Other sources of Vitamin D can be found in oily fish and eggs, cheese and poultry.

Research also suggests that eating carb-rich foods helps the brain take up tryptophan. You can also find supplements and The Food Agency recommends taking 10mcg a day.