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MYOFASCIAL RELEASE THERAPY FOR ALL TYPES OF CHRONIC PAIN…

Myofascial Release Therapy is another therapy that works around acupressure points. It is s now becoming one of best-known massage type of treatment for chronic pain, tension and muscular problems.

Myofascial release therapy (MRT) was originally coined by an osteopath, although today you will find that many well-trained physiotherapists, massage therapists and chiropractors also practice this technique because of its effectiveness. MRT is a hands-on treatment whose purpose is to break down scar tissue, relax your muscles and fascia, and improve posture. Myofascial release therapy is usually slow in nature, and can be deep but does not always need to be as such. Many practitioners state that the technique should be painful to be effective, while others argue that proper use of the therapy does not need to be painful at all.

Research has proven that fascia, like a muscle, has the ability to contract and relax and plays a major role in mobility and stability of joints. Myofascial Release UK say the general understanding of ‘myofascial release’ has changed over the last decade since MFR UK has been providing workshops for healthcare professionals. In the past, MFR was a treatment approach in its own right and everything else was called massage. However, with popularity comes ambiguity and what MFR is and how it’s applied has become somewhat lost in translation over recent years. Normally the term ‘massage’ describes a fluid movement over the body using lubrication. As the popularity of MFR grows, massage treatments are being renamed ‘MFR’ to keep up with the current trends creating confusion for both practitioners seeking professional MFR training and for clients seeking resolve from their #pain and discomfort.

There is a condition known as Myofascial Pain Syndrome which is a chronic painful muscle disorder and is common if you have experienced a muscle injury. Over time these myofascial restrictions can lead to poor biomechanics, altered structural alignment, compromised blood supply and pain. Other causes of myofascial pain are injuries to an intervertebral disc, general fatigue, repetitive motions, and some medical conditions.

It is characterised by the myofascial trigger points and the symptoms include persistent or worsening pain, deep and aching muscle pain, tender knots located in the muscles and pain after exercise or sporting activity.

Myofascial Pain Syndrome (MPS) is the name given to pain caused by trigger points and fascia (connective tissue) adhesions in the body, usually in muscle tissue, and inflammation in the body’s soft tissues.

Myo = muscle
Fascia = the main connective tissue in the body
Release = to let go, ease pressure

Many people with fibromyalgia also have chronic myofascial pain or CMP (formally known as Myofascial Pain Syndrome, MPS) and don’t even know it. It is often missed because it is easy to confuse the pain and it’s origins with that of FM. As a result, it is missed in the diagnosis. Both are connected to the musculoskeletal system, which makes up almost 50% of our body weight, but should not be confused as being the same. Understanding FM and CMP and what makes them tick, will empower you to help yourself. You will be able to figure out some of the contributing factors to your pain, where it originates and what makes it feel better. It will help you understand treatments and find the one(s) that work for you.

It was recently discovered that MPS is not actually a syndrome at all, but a neuromuscular disease. This is important news! The difference? Diseases have known causes and a well-understood process for producing symptoms. Myofascial pain due to trigger points is now considered a true disease, rather than a syndrome. Fibromyalgia is a syndrome like rheumatoid arthritis and lupus and has tender points (not to be confused with trigger points). Even with these differences, it is believed by many researchers that one can influence the other.

In America, sufferers are doing ‘self-myofascial release (foam rolling)’ using a lacrosse ball and foam to roll out trigger points. They say, ‘it can help reduce muscle soreness, increase mobility, and prevent problems created by tightness and poor tissue quality like plantar fascists, sciatica, and more.”

It is a scientific fact that all muscles and their fibrous coating and connective tissue that joins muscles to bones, the fascia, are a source of pain if the functionality is changed by an accident or normal wear and tear/degeneration. Muscles may develop Myofascial ‘tender spots’ or ‘Trigger Points’. These Trigger Points are not only painful where they are found, but may also send pain away from that spot, to what is called Referred pain.

Sources : Ezine, Ezine Myofascial Release UK




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MYOFASCIAL RELEASE FOR CHRONIC PAIN…

Myofascial Release is a form of soft tissue therapy intended for pain relief, increasing your range of motion and balancing the body.

There are now lots of articles online, raving about pain relief using this technique, and many more on how you can treat yourself.

In America, sufferers are doing ‘self-myofascial release (foam rolling)’ using a lacrosse ball and foam to roll out trigger points. They say, ‘it can help reduce muscle soreness, increase mobility, and prevent problems created by tightness and poor tissue quality like plantar fascists, sciatica, and more.”

It is a scientific fact that all muscles and their fibrous coating and connective tissue that joins muscles to bones, the fascia, are a source of pain if the functionality is changed by an accident or normal wear and tear/degeneration. Muscles may develop Myofascial ‘tender spots’ or ‘Trigger Points’. These Trigger Points are not only painful where they are found, but may also send pain away from that spot, to what is called Referred pain.

All the body’s 600 plus muscles have an area in the muscle that is tender to pressure. There are YouTube videos, showing you how to lie on your foam roller to release your tight spine. This technique is gaining popularity every day and has become very popular among athletes and serious fitness enthusiasts. I’ve had a number of treatments and there is no question that it does release the taut muscles which then release pain, but the relief did not last long enough for me. I wasn’t expecting miracles to happen but I was hoping for longer pain relief.

According to the F Word UK Style London’s Fitness elite are flexing their fascia. At Triyoga, myofascial release specialist Suzanne Waterworth uses her feet to feel out kinks in the layers of your fascia, followed by a hands-on resistance stretch, during which she actively reconditions the fascia. ‘Resistance stretching is similar to when you yawn and stretch in the morning,’ she surmises. ‘You tense your muscles first and move through that tension, engaging the fascia and not just pulling on it.’

For something more active, there’s the RX class at Equinox: a self-myofascial massage prehabilitation on the gym floor designed to eliminate pain, improve posture and enhance performance. At Moving Stretch at Breathe London’s Covent Garden studio, meanwhile, you can also work the fascia via resistance stretch movements, which surprisingly is harder work than it sounds. And if you’re a Pilates fan, sign up to the Melt Method — a workshop being held in October in Camden that applies fascial science to your Pilates mat.

The National Association of Myofascial Trigger Point Therapists is a good place to start to find a qualified therapist and a good book on the subject is ‘Myofascial Release: Your Guide to Myofascial Release with a Tennis Ball’ by Merl Buchreich. and the UK site Myofascial Release UK has lots of information on it.