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COMMON CHRONIC PAIN CONDITIONS AND STATISTICS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD…

Chronic pain is conveniently defined as any pain that persists for at least three months despite sensible treatment. It ultimately affects almost half of all adults and is most likely to occur in older people. Chronic pain is known to have significant effects on health and well-being and is a major cause of lost workdays.

Very Well Health say the most common chronic pain conditions in the U.S. are:

  • Migraine
  • Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)
  • Osteoarthritis (OA)
  • Vulvodynia
  • Temporomandibular joint disorder (TMJ)
  • Fibromyalgia

Together, those six conditions affect more than 150 million Americans.

The UK NHS says that “Almost half the adult population is living with chronic pain,” the Daily Mail reports. A major new review suggests that around 28 million adults in the UK are affected by some type of chronic pain (pain that lasts for more than three months).

The researchers used data from 19 studies that included almost 140,000 adults. They extrapolated the results to come up with the estimate that around 43% of people in the UK experience chronic pain. More adults aged 75 or over (62%) experienced pain than those aged 18 to 25 (14.3%). Some of these chronic pain conditions include –

  • Low back pain.
  • Arthritis, especially osteoarthritis.
  • Headache.
  • Multiple sclerosis.
  • Fibromyalgia.
  • Shingles.
  • Nerve damage (neuropathy)
  • Cancer Pain

The British Journal of Anesthesia say that “Chronic pain is a common, complex, and distressing problem, which has a significant impact on society and individuals. It commonly presents as a result of an injury or a disease; however, it is a separate condition in its own right, not merely an accompanying symptom of other ailments. Chronic pain, therefore, has both its own taxonomy and medical definition.”

The population that has the highest prevalence is among women (21.7%), non-Hispanic white adults (23.6%), and those aged 65 and over (30.8%). High impact chronic pain was highest among women (8.5%) and those aged 65 and over (11.8%).

According to Pathways The Country rankings of chronic pain by the number of people affected is –

China – 501 million 39.92% of the population

India – 174 million 13% of the population

United States – between 100 and 116 million 30% of the population

Brazil – 77 million 37% of the population

Mexico – 28.5 million 27% of the population

United Kingdom – 28 million 43% of population

South Africa – 23.7 million 42.3% of the population

Colombia – 23 million 46% of the population

France – 20 million 30% of the population

Germany – between 12 and 20.5 million 14.5 to 25% of the population

Poland – 16 million 42% of the population

Italy -16.2 million 26% of the population

South Korea – 15 million 30% of the population

Japan – 12.7 million 11% of the population

Philippines – 11 million 10.4% of the population

Then the figures really start to fall with Spain – 8 million and only 17% of the population – Australia – 5 million and 20% of the population, Chile -5 million and 27% of the population,

Bolivia – 3.5 million and 3.5% of the population, Portugal -3 million and 31% of the population, Austria – 2.2 million and 24.9% of the population, Netherlands – 2.2 million and 20 % of the population, Finland – 2 million and 35% of the population, Malayasia – 2 million and 7% of the population, Sweden- 1.8 million and only 18% of the population, Norway-1.6 million and 31% of the population, Canada – 1.5 million and 10% of the population, Switzerland – 1.4 million and only 16% of the population, Singapore 1.2 million and 20% of the population, Denmark – 1.1 million and 20.2% of the population, New Zealand – 791 550 and 16.7%, Ireland – 620 000 and 13% of the population and finally Iceland – 160 000 but 47.5% of the population.

It’s a fascinating read of these statistics especially the last one from Iceland with such a low amount and yet such a high proportion of the population.

Source : Pathways

British Journal of Anesthesia

NHS UK

Very Well Health

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THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN OSTEOPENIA AND OSTEOPOROSIS…

If, like me you had never heard of osteopenia then I will explain what this condition is. Web MD write that you should think of it as a midpoint between having healthy bones and having osteoporosis.

Osteopenia is when your bones are weaker than normal but not so far gone that they break easily, which is the hallmark of osteoporosis. Your bones are usually at their densest when you’re about 30. Osteopenia, if it happens at all, usually occurs after age 50. The exact age depends how strong your bones are when you’re young. If they’re hardy, you may never get osteopenia. If your bones aren’t naturally dense, you may get it earlier.

Osteopenia — or seeing it turn into osteoporosis for that matter — is not inevitable. Dietexercise, and sometimes medication can help keep your bones dense and strong for decades.

Recently I was asked to go for a bone scan to look for osteoporosis due to ongoing pain in both my hips, or at least that was what I thought the scan was for. The results came back that I have osteopenia and I have now been put on some medication and they are arranging for me to see a Physiotherapist to start some core strength and weight bearing exercises to avoid it turning into osteoporosis.

When I asked the GP if this was causing my hip pain she said there is no pain associated with osteopenia unless you break a bone. My GP then started asking me a few questions about my hip pain and asked me to pop over and see her. She is now 99% sure that I am suffering from bursitis and is referring me to an Orthopedic Consultant. So, from the pain clinic sending me for a bone scan for hip pain which showed osteopenia I now also have another problem with bursitis which I will cover in another post.

Ortho Atlanta explains about osteopenia and osteoporosis that while these diseases do have some similarities, there are also distinct differences between them. Here’s what you need to know about the differences between osteoporosis and osteopenia.

Osteoporosis means “porous bones.” Bones that are porous, or less dense, are more likely to break. A person with osteoporosis may also walk with a stooped back. Osteopenia is considered a midway point to osteoporosis; the bone density is lower than normal but not as severe and treating it may slow the progression bone loss that leads to osteoporosis. Bone mineral density (BMD) measures the level of calcium in the bones. The lower this level is, the more likely a person is to sustain bone fractures. Osteoporosis and osteopenia are both diseases in which the bone density is low. 

Serious injuries can occur as a result of osteoporosis. Because persons diagnosed with osteoporosis have lost a lot of bone mass, their bones, more porous, and brittle, can fracture from something as simple as a sneeze or a minor fall. Fractures caused by osteoporosis most often occur in the spine. Known as vertebral compression fractures, fractures in the spine are almost twice as common as other fractures typically linked to osteoporosis, such as broken hips and wrists. Osteopenia isn’t quite as serious as osteoporosis because the bones aren’t as porous and measures can be taken to help prevent the onset of osteoporosis

Osteoporosis can’t be reversed; however, it can be managed using the same treatments recommended for osteopenia. In addition to diet and exercise, there are medications the doctor may recommend to help prevent further bone loss.

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Thoracic Spine – Middle Back Basics — El Paso’s Injury Doctors® 915-850-0900

The thoracic spine known as the middle back starts below the cervical or neck spine at around the level of the shoulders. It continues down to the first level of the low back or lumbar spine. There are twelve vertebrae, numbered T1-T12 top to bottom, and it is these vertebrae that make up the thoracic…

via Thoracic Spine – Middle Back Basics — El Paso’s Injury Doctors® 915-850-0900