#backpainblog, #BACKPAINBLOGUK, #covid-19, #COVID-19, #fibromyalgia, #health, #pain, Back Pain, blogging, coping strategies, HEALTH, writing

INTERNATIONAL SEND A CARD TO A FRIEND DAY FEBRUARY 7th 2021…

With millions of us not seeing our friends now due to Covid-19 this special ‘Send a Card to a Friend Day’ on February 7th is very apt. There is nothing like receiving a card with some lovely words in it from a friend or family member, but it does not have to just be for birthdays, anniversaries or Christmas, it can be any time of year.

‘Send a Card to a Friend Day’ is your chance to tell that special person what they mean to you and why. It is nothing like a phone call or an email this is something far more personal than that.

A handmade card would make it even more special. I had decided after Christmas that I was going to write to all my friends, and I have just finished making my cards when I came across this International Awareness Day. Do you get excited when you hear letters pop through your door and you find a hand written card or letter? We all love getting items in the mail. But why? Perhaps its the time it takes to sit down in our busy lives and write the card. Perhaps it’s the fact that the person was thinking about you when they selected the card. Perhaps it’s the quaintness of receiving something so physical in our age of rapid digital and instant gratification. Whatever the reason, join in on February 7th as we celebrate National Send a Card to a Friend Day!

Here are some of my ideas, I hope you like them. All hand made, some hand sewn and painted, some just painted and decorated but all to cheer someone up during this difficult time.

#BACKPAINBLOGUK, #fibromyalgia, #health, #pain, Back Pain, back pain blog, chronic pain, back pain conditions, HEALTH, pain

BPB ALERT NEWS – BEST SUPPLEMENT FOR BACK PAIN – WILLOW BARK…

An article in The Express says that if your back pain is not letting up, then willow bark extract may help. Taking any form of herbal supplements for back pain should be talked about through your GP in the first instance but herbal medicines are widely used for the treatment of pain, although there is often a scarcity of research supporting their efficiency.

Research supporting the use of willow bark extract bucks this trend, however.

Healthline explains that some people use willow bark as an alternative to aspirin, particularly those that experience chronic headaches or back pain. Willow bark is also used in some products to aid weight loss.

It comes from the branches of 2- to 3-year-old willow trees. Willow trees and shrubs grow all over the world, except for Australia and Antarctica. The white willow and black willow are two of the most common willows that are used medicinally. It has been used for centuries as a pain reliever.

study published in The American Journal of Medicine sought to evaluate the effectiveness of willow bark extract for treating back pain. Researchers enrolled 210 patients with an exacerbation of chronic low back pain who reported current pain of five or more (out of 10) on a visual analog scale (VAS).

The VAS is a validated, subjective measure for acute and chronic pain. By the end of the study, significantly more patients in the placebo group required tramadol during each week of the study.

This finding suggests that willow bark extract provides pain relief for lower back pain.

Source : The Express, Healthline, Amazon

#backpainblog, #BACKPAINBLOGUK, #health, #pain, BACK PAIN, back pain blog, chronic pain, back pain conditions, back pain tips, CHRONIC PAIN, FIBROMYALGIA, HEALTH, low back pain

COMMON CHRONIC PAIN CONDITIONS AND STATISTICS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD…

Chronic pain is conveniently defined as any pain that persists for at least three months despite sensible treatment. It ultimately affects almost half of all adults and is most likely to occur in older people. Chronic pain is known to have significant effects on health and well-being and is a major cause of lost workdays.

Very Well Health say the most common chronic pain conditions in the U.S. are:

  • Migraine
  • Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)
  • Osteoarthritis (OA)
  • Vulvodynia
  • Temporomandibular joint disorder (TMJ)
  • Fibromyalgia

Together, those six conditions affect more than 150 million Americans.

The UK NHS says that “Almost half the adult population is living with chronic pain,” the Daily Mail reports. A major new review suggests that around 28 million adults in the UK are affected by some type of chronic pain (pain that lasts for more than three months).

The researchers used data from 19 studies that included almost 140,000 adults. They extrapolated the results to come up with the estimate that around 43% of people in the UK experience chronic pain. More adults aged 75 or over (62%) experienced pain than those aged 18 to 25 (14.3%). Some of these chronic pain conditions include –

  • Low back pain.
  • Arthritis, especially osteoarthritis.
  • Headache.
  • Multiple sclerosis.
  • Fibromyalgia.
  • Shingles.
  • Nerve damage (neuropathy)
  • Cancer Pain

The British Journal of Anesthesia say that “Chronic pain is a common, complex, and distressing problem, which has a significant impact on society and individuals. It commonly presents as a result of an injury or a disease; however, it is a separate condition in its own right, not merely an accompanying symptom of other ailments. Chronic pain, therefore, has both its own taxonomy and medical definition.”

The population that has the highest prevalence is among women (21.7%), non-Hispanic white adults (23.6%), and those aged 65 and over (30.8%). High impact chronic pain was highest among women (8.5%) and those aged 65 and over (11.8%).

According to Pathways The Country rankings of chronic pain by the number of people affected is –

China – 501 million 39.92% of the population

India – 174 million 13% of the population

United States – between 100 and 116 million 30% of the population

Brazil – 77 million 37% of the population

Mexico – 28.5 million 27% of the population

United Kingdom – 28 million 43% of population

South Africa – 23.7 million 42.3% of the population

Colombia – 23 million 46% of the population

France – 20 million 30% of the population

Germany – between 12 and 20.5 million 14.5 to 25% of the population

Poland – 16 million 42% of the population

Italy -16.2 million 26% of the population

South Korea – 15 million 30% of the population

Japan – 12.7 million 11% of the population

Philippines – 11 million 10.4% of the population

Then the figures really start to fall with Spain – 8 million and only 17% of the population – Australia – 5 million and 20% of the population, Chile -5 million and 27% of the population,

Bolivia – 3.5 million and 3.5% of the population, Portugal -3 million and 31% of the population, Austria – 2.2 million and 24.9% of the population, Netherlands – 2.2 million and 20 % of the population, Finland – 2 million and 35% of the population, Malayasia – 2 million and 7% of the population, Sweden- 1.8 million and only 18% of the population, Norway-1.6 million and 31% of the population, Canada – 1.5 million and 10% of the population, Switzerland – 1.4 million and only 16% of the population, Singapore 1.2 million and 20% of the population, Denmark – 1.1 million and 20.2% of the population, New Zealand – 791 550 and 16.7%, Ireland – 620 000 and 13% of the population and finally Iceland – 160 000 but 47.5% of the population.

It’s a fascinating read of these statistics especially the last one from Iceland with such a low amount and yet such a high proportion of the population.

Source : Pathways

British Journal of Anesthesia

NHS UK

Very Well Health