THREE DIFFERENT TYPES OF BACK PAIN…

1. Acute Pain

Acute Pain is a pain that lasts less than 3 to 6 months, or pain directly related to tissue damage. This is the type of pain caused by a paper cut or needle prick. Other examples of acute pain are like labour pains, the pain is acute and identifiable.

Acute low back pain is defined as a pain present for up to six weeks. It could feel like an aching, stabbing, burning, or dull pain. The actual intensity of this type of low back pain could range from mild to severe and could fluctuate or move to other areas of your body like your hip or thigh area.

2. Chronic Pain

Chronic pain describes pain that lasts more than three to six months, or beyond the point of tissue healing. Chronic pain is usually less directly related to identifiable tissue damage and structural problems. Chronic back pain without a clearly determined cause, failed back surgery syndrome (continued pain after the surgery has completely healed), and fibromyalgia are all examples of chronic pain. Chronic pain is much less well understood than acute pain.

Chronic pain can take many forms, but is often described as a pain with an identifiable cause, such as an injury. Certain structural spine conditions, including degenerative disc disease, spinal stenosis, and spondylolisthesis, can cause ongoing pain until they are successfully treated.

3. Neuropathic Pain

Neuropathic pain could be placed in the chronic pain category, but it has a different feel than chronic musculoskeletal pain. The pain is often described as severe, sharp, lightning-like, stabbing, burning, or cold. The individual may also experience ongoing numbness, tingling, or weakness. Pain may be felt along the nerve path from the spine down to the arms/hands or legs/feet.

It is thought that the pain is caused by damage or disease affecting the somatosensory nervous system. Neuropathic pain may be associated with abnormal sensations called dysesthesia or pain from normally non-painful stimuli (allodynia). It may have continuous and/or episodic (paroxysmal) components.

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TREATING ACUTE PAIN BEFORE IT TURNS INTO CHRONIC PAIN…

Although acute back pain can be frustrating to live with, they say that you should try to remain as positive as possible. Research has shown that people with a positive mental attitude tend to have quicker recovery times and are much less likely to progress from acute to chronic back pain.

For acute back pain, they say you should remain as active as possible. If you find it too painful to return to your normal daily activities immediately, pace yourself and aim to do a little more each day.

Going back to work can help you to return to a normal pattern of activity, and it can often distract you from your symptoms of pain so don’t wait until all the pain has gone before you go back.

People with back pain find that using either hot or cold compression packs helps to reduce pain. Personally, I prefer heat rather than ice.

Placing a small firm cushion beneath your knees when you are sleeping on your side, or using several firm pillows to prop up your knees when lying on your back, may also help to ease your symptoms.

If the symptoms persist then go and see your GP or a professional chiropractor or physiotherapist.

CAN LONG TERM USE OF OPIOIDS CAUSE RESPIRATORY PROBLEMS AND IS IT TIME FOR A CHANGE…

Can long term use of opioids cause respiratory problems and is it time for a change?

The straight answer is ‘yes’, according to Desert Home Treatment who say that ‘ The long-term effects of opioids on the bowels are significant, but it is the damage they do to the respiratory system that is behind most of the overdoses and fatalities that are related to opioid use. As opioids depress the central nervous system, they directly interfere with the body’s breathing mechanisms.’

Science Daily pointed out that ‘ Opioids are highly effective at killing pain, but they can also kill people by depressing their breathing and at the same time sedating them so that it can be impossible for them to wake up from oxygen deprivation,” says Richard Horner, a professor in the departments of Medicine and Physiology.’

Most pain killers opioids or otherwise can cause side effects but they tend to improve shortly after starting the treatment or following an intended dose increase. The most common side effect being constipation and itching but a respiratory problem is feared by many. They say it is mostly a concern in acute pain management where patients have not developed tolerance.

So should we be right to be sceptical about taking opioids for long term pain when they keep appearing in the news as sceptical ? Drug Abuse has written a great article on a ‘Need for Change’ with a list of 10 opiate alternatives. They include –

Over-the-Counter Acetaminophen

Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs)

Cortiosteroids

Serotonin and Norephinephrine

Reuptake Inhibitors

Neurostimulators

Anticonvulsants

Injections

Physical Therapy Massage, Acupuncture and Chiropractic Care

Exercise

It’s certainly something to ponder about.

 

10 HABITS THAT CAUSE BACK PAIN…

This infographic from Inversion Table Review Blog has 10 very important habits that can cause back pain.

They are simple every day movements that can greatly affect your back.

Sitting for too long is the classic one and one I think young children are doing far too much of that nowadays.

Having poor posture. When we were young you were awarded posture belts for good posture at school. They don’t seem to do that now.

Skipping exercise. Again the younger generation seem to prefer to sit with their iPhones which seems to have become the norm now.

Overlooking an unhealthy diet. With so many ready meals available, it has also become the norm to just buy a meal to pop in your microwave or oven but until home cooking is taught from an early age I don’t think this will alter quickly.

Sleeping on an old mattress. This is a fairly new idea to alleviate back pain. We do change ours regularly but was something that you probably didn’t do years ago,

Wearing high heels. I’m afraid I was very guilty of that but the fashion now is easy to follow in low or flat heels when not out on the town.

Letting stress build up. This is something I have written about before and is definitely applicable for people in any type of pain.

Watching too much tv. I guess this applies to point three and skipping exercise as so many people just watch some of screen for hours on end.

Ignoring back pain. This is very very important as the longer you leave it before you seek advice or help the harder it will be to sort the problem out.