MY TOP THREE PILLOWS FOR THE DISCOMFORT OF BACK AND NECK PAIN…

Pillows are so personal don’t you think? After my first cervical surgery I had to wear a collar so it didn’t really matter what pillow I had but after the second cervical fusion they did not advise one but neither did they advise any type of pillow, so I stuck with the same soft type for years. So much so that when I go to a Hotel and the pillow is hard I find it very difficult to get to sleep.

However, they have now found out that certain neck pillows can not only help with the pain from disc injuries and whiplash but also for back pain, shoulder pain and even chronic pain.

There are obviously quite a few different types advertised and the tempa ones are advertised everywhere. When I go for my afternoon rest I always just get under the throw and sleep on my v pillow, on my side whereas when I got to bed at night I sleep on a fairly flat a pillow which would not suit most people but after two cervical fusions my neck is pretty stiff so I cannot cope with anything too thick. My other problem is that although I know I should sleep on my side or on my back I love going to sleep on my front which is the worst position for neck and back problems.

My top three choices are –

Sealy Activsleep Geltex Memory Foam Pillow, Amazon, £34.99

This pillow focuses on ventilation and airflow which runs between the hundreds of tiny fibres that surround the Geltex core so it has lots of breath ability. It’s great for allergy sufferers in mind too, with hypoallergenic filling and a knitted Purotex cover to prevent bugs and bacteria.

I personally found this too high for myself but my husband who usually has two pillows found this one pillow enough for him and extremely comfortable. I did struggle getting it into a regular size pillow case, though.

  • Sealy Activsleep Geltex Pillow standard size 74 x 48cm
  • Made with a supportive and comfortable memory foam shell that is ventilated to increase airflow and breathability and prevent overheating
  • The revitalising Geltex core provides support, comfort and coolness and is surrounded by DuPont Cotrano fibres which are light and bouncy
  • Knitted Purotex cover helps to combat pillow nasties such as bugs and bacteria
  • Made in the UK, anti-allergenic, 2 year manufacturer’s guarantee

My second choice is The White Company Memory Foam Comfort Pillow which is £45

This special shape-contouring pillow is made with shredded memory foam, which means it gives fantastic firm support with added comfort. The beauty of this design is that it gives the supportive benefits of memory foam, while boasting the sleek appearance of a traditional pillow. If you sleep on your side, this pillow will bridge the gap between your shoulder and neck for perfect alignment. What’s more, the soft casing can be unzipped and machine washed at 40°C, making it wonderfully easy to care for.

Firm support
Non-Allergenic 
Filling: 100% memory foam clusters

I LOVE this pillow but then I love just about everything at The White Company. It fitted perfectly into a normal size pillow case and feels more like a normal luxury pillow rather than a memory foam pillow, which is why I think I like it so much.

It’s better for side sleepers, which I should be but prefer to sleep on my stomach and it definitely bridges the gap between your shoulder and neck for correct alignment. I love that it can be unzipped and popped into the washing machine.

My third choice is Soak and Sleep’s soft Duck Feather and Down pillows are a delightful way for front sleepers to nod off, from £20.

It feels substantial thanks to the generous quantity of small, soft duck feathers blended with light and lofty duck down, and is very reasonably priced too. You can choose between a soft/medium pillow – ideal for front sleepers or a deeper medium/firm pillow that’s better suited to side and back sleepers.

This pillow will support your head and neck for good spinal alignment – you can choose from their range of pillow fills, firmnesses and depths to suit your sleeping style.

Covered with a 233 thread count percale to help wick away moisture for a cooler, more refreshing night’s sleep. It’s another pillow that can be machine washed.

You can choose between a soft/medium pillow – ideal for front sleepers or a deeper medium/firm pillow that’s better suited to side and back sleepers. Obviously I chose the soft/medium pillow.

Advertisements

THE BEST PILLOW POSITIONS FOR PEOPLE WITH BACK PAIN…

If you adopt the best pillow positions for people with back pain you may find this really helps your sleep. Tuck Advanced Better Sleep says Individuals who experience back pain can adjust or reposition their pillows in order to alleviate their discomfort. According to Healthline, the following methods may be suitable for different sleepers:

  • Side sleeping with a pillow between the knees. You should ensure your body makes contact with the mattress between your shoulder and buttocks. The pillow should be placed in a position where it won’t slip out; this will help the hips and pelvis align with the spine, which can reduce pain and discomfort. If a gap forms between your side and the mattress, then a smaller pillow may be used to fill that space.
  • Fetal position with both knees tucked. To achieve this position, lie down on your back and then roll onto one side with both knees bent and tucked toward your chest. Bend your upper body toward the knees; this will help expand the spine and alleviate pressure on the disks. Be sure to rotate to the other side if you begin to experience discomfort.
  • Stomach sleeping with a pillow beneath the pelvis. Although stomach sleeping can exacerbate back pain symptoms, a pillow placed under the pelvis can relieve stress on the neck and back disks. Some sleepers in this position are more comfortable without a pillow beneath their head.
  • Back sleeping with a pillow beneath the knees. Lay flat on your back and place a pillow beneath both knees. This helps straighten out the spine and alleviates pressure points between the neck and hips. If you find this is insufficient, consider placing a rolled-up towel under your lower back.

 There are six standard sizes for pillows, as well as smaller specialty sizes normally associated with specific pillow types (such as orthopedic memory foam pillows). The following table breaks down the width and length dimensions of these seven sizes, as well as suitable pillowcase measurements.

PILLOW SIZE DIMENSIONS PILLOW CASE SIZE AND DIMENSIONS NOTES
Small 20W” x 12L” Specialty sizes Normally found with orthopedic/cervical pillows (see below)
Standard 20W” x 26L” Standard (20-21W” x 30-32″L) The most common pillow size, as well as the most compact and usually the least expensive
Super Standard 20W” x 28L” Standard (20-21W” x 30-32″L) Slightly longer than the Standard, but uses Standard-size pillowcases
Queen 20W” x 30L” Standard (20-21W” x 30-32″L)

Queen (20-22W” x 30-34L”)

The second most common pillow size, and suitable for most people who toss and turn
King 20W” x 36L” King (20-21W” x 36-41″L) Good for people who toss and turn, and also makes good headrests and backrests
Euro 26W” x 26L”

24W” x 24L”

22W” x 22L”

20W” x 20L”

18W” x 18L”

16W” x 16L”

Euro (dimensions vary) The only standard pillow size that is square-shaped, and not normally used for primary sleeping pillows
Body Pillow 54W” x 20L”

48W” x 20L”

Body pillow (dimensions vary) The longest pillow size, mostly suitable for side sleepers and pregnant women

Pillow shape is also important for people with back pain. Although a wide selection of pillow shapes are available, pillows generally fall into one of these two categories:

  • Even: These pillows have an even, non-contoured surface. They may not be as suitable for sleepers with back pain, but pillows made from certain materials (such as shredded memory foam or feathers) conform beneath the head and neck for targeted pain and pressure relief.
  • Curved: Also known as cervical or orthopedic pillows, curved pillows are usually made from foam and have a contoured surface. The neck is raised with the area for the head dips down, which can provide better support for people with neck pain — but some sleepers claim that these pillows are more comfortable when they are placed upside down on the mattress.

Lastly, let’s discuss pillow loft, a term that refers to how thick a pillow is when not bearing weight. Specific loft measurements vary by model, but there are three general loft categories:

  • Low-loft: Less than three inches thick.
  • Medium-loft: Three to five inches thick.
  • High-loft: More than five inches thick.

The loft will help determine how supportive and comfortable the pillow feels, and whether it is suitable for people with back pain. However, there are several factors to take into account when selecting a pillow based on loft. These include:

Sleep position: Choosing the right pillow based on loft depends on whether the sleeper prefers the back, side, or stomach position.

  • Back-sleepers are usually most comfortable with medium-loft pillows because they find the right balance between thickness and softness.
  • Side-sleepers often prefer medium- or high-loft pillows because this position can cause large gaps to form between their head/neck and the pillow.
  • Stomach-sleepers tend to prefer low-loft pillows because higher-loft models elevate the neck too much, causing the spine to become uneven; this can lead to aches and pains throughout the body. Some stomach sleepers find that not using a pillow at all is most comfortable.

Pillow position: People who sleep with a pillow completely beneath often prefer medium-loft pillows because there is less space. For those who sleep with a pillow partially beneath their head, then a medium- or high-loft pillow may be needed to fill the larger gap.

Mattress type: Certain mattresses, such as all-foam and latex models, are designed to sink deeply beneath the sleeper’s body. A low-loft pillow may be most suitable for these mattresses because there is less space between the neck and the mattress surface. Other mattresses, such as innersprings and hybrids, are less responsive and will not sink as much. A medium- or high-loft pillow can help fill the extra space and provide more support.

Body weight: People with above-average weights (more than 230 pounds) may sink deeper into their mattress than lighter individuals, and thus prefer a low- or medium-loft pillow that won’t elevate their heads too much. People with below-average weights (less than 130 pounds) may prefer medium- or high-loft pillows because they don’t sink as much.

Head size: People with larger-than-average heads are more likely to feel comfortable on a high-loft pillow that won’t sink too deeply. Low- or medium-loft pillows may be the best option for those with small or average-size heads

Shoulder width: People with wider shoulder spans experience larger gaps between their head/neck and their pillow, and may need a higher-loft pillow to compensate for space. Those with narrower shoulders usually feel more comfortable with low- or medium-loft pillows.

It’s important to note that many pillows offer adjustable loft. The owner simply unzips the pillow cover and adds or removes the fill material to increase or decrease the loft. Adjustable-loft pillows may be the best option for people whose loft preferences tend to vary from night tonight.

Best Pillow Materials for People with Back Pain

Pillows come in a wide selection of fill materials, each with unique benefits and drawbacks for sleepers with back pain. The table below lists pros, cons, and back pain ratings for the seven most common pillow materials.

PILLOW MATERIAL DESCRIPTION PROS CONS NECK PAIN RATING
Buckwheat The pillows are filled with five to 10 pounds of buckwheat hulls, or outer shells Adjustable loft

Sleeps cool

Good support

High price

Too firm for some

Heavy and difficult to move

Good

Buckwheat pillows offer adjustable loft and sleep fairly cool, but many people with back pain find they are too firm

Down The pillows contain the soft inner plumage of ducks or geese, and may also be padded with outer feathers Adjustable loft

Lightweight

Sleeps cool

High price

Flatten easily

Too soft for some

Fair
Most down pillows are not suitable for sleepers with back pain because they are excessively soft and will lose their shape quickly
Down Alternative The pillows are filled with polyester fibers that mimic the softness of real down Adjustable loft

Lightweight

Low price

Short lifespan

Flatten easily

Too soft for some

Poor

Most sleepers with back pain do not feel comfortable on down alternative pillows because they are too soft and will become flat rather quickly

Feather Pillows are filled with outer feathers of ducks or geese (as opposed to down, or inner plumage) Adjustable loft

Lightweight

Long lifespan

High cost

Flatten easily

Very Good

Feather pillows tend to be firmer than down pillows, making them more suitable for people with back pain

Latex Pillows contain solid latex, a substance extracted from the sap of rubber trees Close conforming

Long lifespan

Retain full shape without flattening

Non-adjustable loft

High cost

Dense and heavy

Good

Latex pillows offer even support, but the loft is not adjustable

Memory Foam Pillows may contain shredded or solid pieces of memory foam, which softens when it comes into contact with body heat Close conforming

Adjustable loft if shredded

Lightweight

High cost

Sleeps hot

Very Good

Memory foam pillows conform closely and alleviate a high amount of pressure; most orthopedic pillows are made from memory foam

Polyester Pillows contain shredded polyfoam, which has a similar feel to memory foam, or interlocking polyester fibers that give the pillow a fuller shape Low cost

Adjustable loft when shredded

Short lifespan

Flattens easily

Sleeps hot

Good

Memory foam pillows provide more pain and pressure relief, but polyfoam pillows can be a low-cost alternative for people with back pain

Additionally, some pillows contain interior water chambers that can be filled or drained to adjust the loft. The chambers are usually padded with foam to make the pillow more comfortable. Many sleepers with back pain claim that water chamber pillows alleviate pain and pressure to a noticeable extent.

PILLOWS AND YOUR SLEEP…

throw

Did you know that pillows can impact on the quality of your sleep and rest.

The wrong pillow can worsen headaches, neck pain, shoulder and arm numbness, discomfort, sneezing and even wheezing.

Another problem is that if your pillow is old then it could contain skin cells, mould, mildew, fungus
and dust mites etc.

The rule of thumb is that you should buy a pillow every 12 – 18 months.

Cushion