#SLEEP SUNDAY – LETS TALK ABOUT SLEEP AND THE BEST SLEEP POSITIONS…

It’s Sleep Sunday, so let’s talk about the best sleep positions for people who suffer from back pain. If are suffering from degenerative disc disease then they say that one of the best positions is to sleep on your stomach as this can relieve the pressure on the disc space. You should then place a flat pillow under your stomach and hips to help reduce stress on your lower back.

However, in general, elevating the knees slightly by placing a pillow under them while lying on your back can help many general forms of low back pain.

If you are experiencing upper back pain then use a memory foam pillow or no pillows under your head. Lie on your side and place a pillow between your knees.

When lying in bed try the Fowler Position, on your back with legs bent at right angles and supported by a pillow stack which helps to minimise pressure on your discs.

According to wikepedia the Fowler’s position is a standard patient position. It is used to relax tension of the abdominal muscles, allowing for improved breathing in immobile patients as it alleviates compression of the chest due to gravity, and to increase comfort during eating and other activities. It is also used in postpartum women to improve uterine drainage. The patient is placed in a semi-upright sitting position (45-60 degrees) and may have knees either bent or straight.

No one knows more about back and neck pain than Robin McKenzie. The world-renowned physiotherapist and author has dedicated his working life to developing innovative and effective solutions to neck and back ailments. Currently used by leading physiotherapists worldwide his range of lumbar rolls are the result of 40 years of expertise in successfully treating neck and back problems.

This McKenzie night roll ties around the waist or can be pinned to the bed sheets to support the lower back. It helps to prevent strain that can be caused by poor sleeping positions.

 

SLEEP SUNDAY – LET’S TALK ABOUT SLEEP…HOW SOME FAMOUS PEOPLE SLEEP…

It’s Sleep Sunday – Let’s Talk About Sleep and this week I thought you might enjoy this article and infographic which was sent to me from Disturb Me Not, on how some famous people sleep.

Did you know that Napoleon slept only four hours a day or that Leonardo Da Vinci was a polyphasic sleeper? In our infographic, you can find out some pretty amazing facts about famous people from the world of politics, business, sports, science, and art and their strange sleeping habits.

Although we should sleep eight hours every night to stay healthy and be productive, most of these successful people don’t follow this ideal sleep pattern. Some of them were even able to work for days without any rest. Surprisingly, regardless of their questionable sleep habits, they managed to come up with some astonishing inventions that changed our daily lives.

It’s really unexpected that people with such unusual habits have become so successful since we all know that lack of sleep impairs our ability to focus and think clearly. Of course, this doesn’t mean you should sleep less than recommended. A good night’s sleep is vital for your physical and mental wellbeing.

If you think that famous people don’t have sleep problems, you’re terribly wrong. Many of them suffer from sleep disorders, from insomnia to sleep paralysis. But you may find the kinds of home remedies for good sleep they used to deal with them particularly interesting. For example, one famous painter used camphor for treating insomnia, which eventually led to his death.

So would you like to find out which scientist slept 20 hours a day and which slept only 3–4 hours every night? Maybe you’re interested in learning more about Tesla’s sleeping habits? If so, check out the infographic they prepared for me.

 

SLEEP SUNDAY – LET’S TALK ABOUT SLEEP AND DUVETS…

It’s Sleep Sunday – Let’s Talk About Sleep and this week I am writing about Duvet’s.

Duvet’s, love them or hate them we all sleep with them now. I still use a sheet under my duvet but that’s just so it makes it easier for me to change the bed. It means I change my sheet every week but only change the duvet once a month as the sheet is against our skin. Being small ( in height 😀) it’s quite an effort for me to change a king size duvet and my back certainly doesn’t like it so that’s when I decided to use a sheet under the duvet.

I don’t know about you but I absolutely LOVE getting into a clean and fresh bed. But then I do love my bed. My bedroom is my sanctuary somewhere I love going to for my afternoon rest. When we moved down south this year I spent time planning how my room would look and feel and I could not be happier with the finished room.

Beth Urmston from Fibro Flare Support Group a registered charity sent me a link to an article in Country Life Magazine on How to Sleep Like A Lamb : The Benefit of a Pure Wool Duvet. They say that you can get a perfect night’s sleep with a pure wool duvet made of old fashioned sheep’s wool. ‘It creates the perfect climate for each person,’ explains Bridgett Kelly, interior textiles director of the Campaign for Wool. ‘a duvet containing synthetic fibres doesn’t adjust to the individual, but wool gives you improved quality of deep sleep, which leaves t‘he body rejuvenated.’ said Julie Harding from Country Life Magazine.

Wool in bedding isn’t a new concept, but the arrival of the Continental quilt in the 1970s meant that heavy, itchy, difficult-to-wash blankets were consigned to the airing cupboard. in 2009, Channel 4’s My Dream Farm, presented by Monty Don, showcased Dick and Pauline Beijen’s early attempts to add value to their sheep’s wool by using it as a duvet filling and this helped bring about the resurgence of wool as a bedding material.


Countrys Life writes that sales have grown by 800% in the past three years, making The Wool Room the market leader. The company’s researchers took 12 years to develop a wool filling that can be washed in a machine and it invited allergy UK to devise a test for allergens. ‘after six weeks, there were no dust mites, no bacteria and no fungus in our duvets,’ confirms Mr Tattersall, who promotes his products as suitable for asthma, eczema and allergic-rhinitis sufferers, although he cautions against buying inexpensive imports. ‘The cheaper wool duvets use synthetic liners, which will defeat the object, plus you don’t know where the wool comes from. The UK has the best wool in the world. We tend to buy from the eastern seaboard. Provenance is important to us.’

There choice of where to buy your wool duvet from is –

  • Southdown Duvets, Scotland Farm, Upland Lane, Hawkley, Hampshire (01730 827148; www.southdownduvets.com)
  • Devon Duvets, 9, Bluewater Estate, Bell Close, Plympton, Devon (01752 345399; www.devonduvets.com)
  • The Wool Room (01780 461217; www.thewoolroom.com)
  • Baavet Baavet Cyf, Unit 12, Tan y Castell, Harlech, Gwynedd (01766 780780; www.baavet.co.uk)
  • Personally, I have never slept under a wool duvet and would love to hear from any bloggers that have one and their verdict on if it gives you a better night’s sleep. It’s certainly not something I would have thought of buying as I would immediately think I would be too hot in one. It’s certainly something worth thinking about.