REVIEW ON JOYA SHOES – BLISS FOR YOUR BACK…

I was given the opportunity to try a pair of Joya Shoes which they explain ‘support the natural movement process and encourage active walking. Joya shoes also promote healthy posture, which provides relief to the back and joints and can also reduce and prevent back and joint pain.’

As a chronic back pain sufferer walking out in the open is something I only really enjoyed occasionally when I was having a good day with my back. My biggest problem was deciding how far I could walk on any particular day so I was very excited to see if these shoes would make any difference.

The first impression when I put the shoes on was how high and supported I felt. It felt a bit like walking on air. The soft and springing material of the Joya sole transforms a hard and flat floor into a soft, elastic surface.

This, they say ‘increasingly activates small support and stability muscles again, which can remove stress from the joints and the spinal column. Plus, “micro movements” support the activity of the foot, calf, and leg muscles, which enable active walking and standing.’

Well, I have to say I am more than impressed with these shoes. The last few weeks have been an ideal time for me to see how far I could walk while in isolation. We are lucky enough to have lots of walks on The South Downs on our doorstep and the dry weather over the last couple of weeks has meant it safer to walk off-piste.

When my daughter first saw me in a pair of Joya shoes she thought I looked ‘very trendy’, which at the end of the day is also important to us women. Their shoes most definitely do what they say and relieve the back pain and cushions the feet and support healthy walking. Joya Shoes website explains in great detail about how these shoes work with a video and all about the Optimal pressure distribution, Joya ensures smooth rolling movement and optimum pressure distribution. This prevents pressure spikes in heel and forefoot. Joya footwear enables natural movement and encourages active walking.

At the moment one of their suppliers ShoeMed has an offer of 15% discount on full RRP to everyone Code: HURRY15. The code is valid until the end of the month. I wouldn’t hesitate to give these shoes a try if you get back pain during or after walking.

SELF DIAGNOSING BACK PAIN…

The most common type of back pain that people suffer from is often acute back pain. This is pain that’s severe and happens out of nowhere, or at least it seems that way. In reality, there’s often a trigger that caused the pain, and you’ll be able to remedy the problem once you figure out what it is.

Chronic back pain, however, is recurrent and can last for weeks or months, and sometimes even longer. It’s usually related to diseases such as osteoporosis, degenerative disc disease, etc. The severity of your back pain usually dictates whether you’ll see a doctor or not. Most people with mild back pain, tend to just wait things out and rest. While this is understandable, if the pain is nagging and doesn’t go away, you must see a doctor as soon as possible so that any possible problems can be treated in the early stages, before it turns into some chronic.

SUDDEN ONSET OF BACK PAIN…

If you have sudden onset back pain, this could be due to an injury or a fall, or a strain. In some cases, the pain may only show up a day after the event, so you may have forgotten about it.

For example, if you strained your back while moving the couch, your lower back may start to throb or hurt a day later. By then you may have forgotten about the couch and be wondering why your back hurts. So, you’ll need to think back.

This is just one example. Working out at the gym, braking suddenly while driving, or even bumps to the back can cause back pain. In these cases, some pain killers and rest will suffice.

Usually, lifting heavy objects or twisting your trunk may cause sudden onset back pain. The facet joints get temporarily out of alignment and this will cause the joint to get inflamed. The surrounding soft tissues and muscles will get swollen and hurt. You may need to see a doctor.

GRADUAL ONSET OF BACK PAIN…

Another type of back pain is one that starts gradually. Sciatica is one such issue. If you have pain that’s located between your lower back and glutes, you might be suffering from ankylosing spondylitis. Pregnant women whose backs are strained will also display similar symptoms.

Another serious gradual onset of back pain arises when there is inflammation in the sacroiliac joints. In cases like these, you must see a doctor. Numbness around your back and buttocks, loss of bladder control, pain during bowel movements, etc. are all signs of back issues that require professional medical attention.

CHRONIC BACK PAIN…

With these types of back pain, it may seem like there’s no cause. The pain may come and go away. It’s episodic, recurrent and not as severe as acute back pain.

Usually, chronic back pain arises due to poor posture that takes a toll on the joints and muscles over time. Correcting your posture will remedy the problem. It could also be due to ageing, where your joints suffer wear and tear.

If the pain is persistent or worsens, there may be inflammation. It’ll be best to see a doctor.

These are the 3 types of back pain that generally affect most people. What you really need to know is that when assessing your pain, you must be honest with yourself. If the pain is getting worse, do not bury your head in the sand and expect it to go away. Keep a diary so you can explain in detail about your pain should you need to see a GP.

4 THINGS YOU SHOULD DO OVER THE WEEKEND TO HELP WITH SELF ISOLATION OF THE COVID-19…

After what you could only call a shocking week with the speed of this virus now is the time to get in touch with all you know. Four things to do over the weekend which will help with your self isolation and maybe reassure someone you know.

1. Contact every single person on your phone that is a friend relative or work colleague and let them know you are thinking of them and their family.

2. Get out your address book and that old one you only use at Christmas. Look up friends or family that you only correspond with at Christmas. Especially that great Aunt you’ve not seen for years and write them a short letter or send them a card saying you are thinking of them. A card or letter to someone elderly and on their own would really cheer them up.

3. Go through all your friends, family and work colleagues on Facebook and message each one that you are thinking of them, even ones you haven’t been in touch with and are just connected through groups you have joined.

4. Finally, go through your email list and do the same as above and maybe clear out some emails you’ve been keeping for a long long time and are of no interest to you anymore.

This could take more than a weekend for most people but I guarantee you will feel some love and new friendships will be born during this awful ordeal we are going through. I’ve already started mine and have had some lovely replies. Share your stories.

And, on that note please take care all my blog friends. We are all taking steps to control the outbreak and prepare to get through whatever may come of it, but adhere to what the professionals are asking us to do and remember we are all here to support each other. Think of the vulnerable and wash your hands regularly. Blog regularly we all have plenty of time to read each other’s posts.

WHAT’S ALL THE BUZZ ABOUT PAIN AND NEUROMODULATION…

Harvard Health Publishing wrote that “ Chronic pain is an enigma for both pain doctors and their patients: difficult to understand (as everyone’s pain is different), challenging to treat effectively, and frustrating to live with. Desperate patients sometimes turn to drastic and irreversible surgical procedures, like amputating nerves to relieve pain, and unfortunately even those procedures may fail to provide the hoped-for results.”

Fortunately there have been great strides in research related to pain perception and our nervous system’s reaction to various pain treatments, and we’ve been able to develop novel devices that provide many people with much-needed relief and improve their quality of life.

Neuromodulation is “the alteration of nerve activity through targeted delivery of a stimulus, such as electrical stimulation or chemical agents, to specific neurological sites in the body.” Dr. Norman Shealy, a neurosurgeon, implanted the first device for the relief of intractable pain in 1967, and his work ushered in a new era for chronic pain management.

One of the most common examples of neuromodulation is the use of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) for chronic pain management. SCS consists of a very thin lead (or wire) that is placed in the space just outside the spinal cord (known as the epidural space). The lead is attached to a small generator device that is implanted under the skin and subcutaneous layer in the back or buttock. The devices will deliver frequent, low-voltage electrical impulses to the spine, with subsequent modulation of the pain signals in transit to the brain. Those impulses often feel like a gentle tingling or buzzing (which is called paresthesia) on the body.

Harvard explain that another form of neuromodulation is the intrathecal pump, which is a device designed to deliver a desired medication directly into the spinal fluid surrounding the spinal cord.

Neuromodulation treatments have typically been offered to patients only after they have tried conventional treatment options such as medications, physical and occupational therapy, or surgery. Although the treatment is not without risks it is a cost affective option for managing chronic pain, in particular after failed surgery,

Guy’s & St. Thomas’ NHS Hospital in London have a Chronic Pain Management & Neuromodulation Centre. It is internationally recognised as a centre of clinical and academic excellence in the management of chronic pain.

They have a long history of providing traditional chronic pain management treatments such as day case procedures and outpatient treatments.

They have also established world prominence in the fields of spinal cord stimulation and other neuromodulation techniques, as well as in addressing the psychological, physical and social impacts of chronic pain with our pain management programmes. This is delivered through the INPUT pain management department.

The centre collaborates closely with spinal surgeons in the assessment and treatment of spinal pains, and similarly provides highly specialised, multidisciplinary assessments for conditions including chronic headache, facial pain and pelvic pain.

A PHYSIOTHERAPIST – IS THAT LIKE A PHYSICAL THERAPIST?…

A physiotherapist is a specialist seeing patients affected by illness, injury, or disability through manipulation and exercise along with other resources to encourage movement and functionality. The professional is capable of seeing people of all ages for health maintenance, assisting them with pain management and disease prevention. The goal for this therapist is to facilitate recovery enabling independence for as long as the patient remains capable.

A ‘whole-body’ approach inclusive of general lifestyle is the basis for this science-reliant position in well-being and health. A core component with physiotherapy is patient involvement via education, empowerment, awareness, and full participation throughout the process. It has a broad spectrum of benefits with the potential to aid those who sustain sudden injuries, people enduring back pain, those managing long-term ailments, preparation for athletics, or childbirth. But what is the difference between this professional and a ‘physical therapist in a clinic?

Physiotherapist vs. Physical Therapist

Confusion ensues for patients left to schedule an appointment for physical therapy(go to https://www.libertyptnj.com for an example of a PT clinic), and they’re facing a choice between a physiotherapist or a physical therapist not understanding the difference. Claims exist that physiotherapy concentrates more on hands-on manual rehabilitation while physical therapy is more focused on exercise as rehabilitation. A majority of those involved in the industry, however, insist the terms are synonymous often used interchangeably, in fact.

A point of distinction regarding the phrasing can have some basis in the various regions throughout the world such as Canada, Australia, and within Europe where the specialty deems the title physiotherapy compared to the reference physical therapy as it’s known in the United States. Regardless of how you denote the profession, the essentials are the same. They, of course, both have a medical background with a concentration on injury prevention, flexibility improvements, and acute pain management primarily along with a multitude of other designations. The goal for these specialists is to bring a person with severe injury or chronic illness to a place where their lifestyle improves, exercises of daily living become more manageable, and the quality of their life enhances.

What Is Involved in Physiotherapy?

Some claims state that physiotherapy treatment is a hands-on approach to rehabilitation. Still, it involves a variety of procedures and preventative techniques depending on the particular issues for which you may be dealing. With a first visit to a clinic, there will be an initial evaluation to assess the level of treatment that you may require. Follow https://healthtimes.com.au/hub/physiotherapy/8/guidance/nc1/what-do-physiotherapists-do/467/ to read about what these professionals do. The three primary methods for care include:• Advice and educating• Movement with exercises• Manual therapy

Other forms of care may have use in conjunction with these procedures, such as ultrasound or acupuncture, often.

The concept behind this specialty is to approach the body wholly rather than concentrating on the sole source of the injury or illness. The clinic will provide essential advice on how to enhance well-being as a critical aspect of the treatment. The education can include ways in which you can perform daily activities with less chance for injury or pain. Or, if you have chronic pain, there may be suggestions given on proper lifting techniques or posture.

The physiotherapist is going to provide exercises in an attempt to improve overall functionality and mobility. They will advise as to the importance of remaining active and the way to do so safely and effectively. In most situations, there are exercises assigned to be performed while at home as well for continuity.

Manual therapy is useful in an attempt to manipulate, massage, and mobilize body tissue. The treatment aids in alleviating pain and stiffness, increases blood circulation, encourages efficient fluid drainage through areas of the body, helps with the movement of the body, and encourages relaxation. Patient care involving manual therapy is beneficial, particularly for those suffering from serious ailments. It has the potential to reduce stress and decrease anxiety typical with long-term conditions. Follow this link to learn why this form of specialty is being used.

Summary

Physiotherapists focus their energy on giving patients as much of their independence as they’re capable of for as long as they are capable. The goal for this professional is to teach their patients to maintain an active and functional lifestyle, perform activities of daily living, achieve a sense of well-being, basically enjoy their life as a whole.