TOP PICKS ON THE BEST WAYS AND PRODUCTS TO KEEP PAIN AT BAY WHILE TRAVELLING…

Over the years I have tried many different products to ease the pain while travelling. I have NEVER let my pain stop me from going to places, I have just tried to find the best products to help me along the way.

 

All the planning for your holiday fun are ready but I bet the last person you have thought about was yourself.  We are busy planning fun for the children and visit’s to different places instead of thinking about ourselves.

My top pick on the best ways and products to keep your pain at bay while travelling are –

The easy way to avoid a flare-up is to plan ahead. Walk the event through your head. How long will you be in the car? if it’s going to be a long haul journey make sure you have your coccyx wedge cushion with you. They are not just for sciatica pain but is great for low back and fibromyalgia pain.  It’s easily portable so think about what you will be sitting on when you arrive at your destination.

Magnetic back support belts are great for back pain but can also help avoid back pain by wearing them when you travel. They are self-heating and you really can feel the heat coming through after they have been on you for only a short time.

Think about what the temperature is going to be like where you are going to. Pack your pain relief cushions which are great hot or cold for neck pain or any other body pain and can come in handy if someone else in the family has some pain. This company do a number of different shapes and sizes.

Buy yourself a 14-day pill organiser as it’s easy to forget when you last had your medication while away from your usual environment. Pack a second lot of pills and pop in another suitcase in case the original got lost during the flight ( this has happened to me). I love this colourful one by BOENFU, the colours brighten your day rather than looking unappealing.

 Finally, don’t forget to pack your walking stick as you will, without doubt, be walking on completely different terrine to what you are used to at home and that can soon trigger off low back pain. Folding walking sticks are cheap enough to buy nowadays and there are also some pretty and floral ones around.  I learnt very quickly to make sure I had a spare in the boot of the car or in my suitcase in case I lost my original one en route.

I found this very interesting pin on Pinterest from The Viking Abroad blog who has written down her tips on how to travel with Fibromyalgia.

The writer Vibeke who is a travel writer and photographer is also a Fibromyalgia sufferer and so has to plan carefully for her trips around the world.

She comments that good shoes are the key which of course is essential. The latest ones that I have seen which are ideal for travel are Joya shoes. The positive effect of a soft, springy surface on the locomotive system has been put to good use by a physiotherapist for a long time now and is a highly topical subject in the fields of prevention/rehabilitation. The Joya brand has developed a shoe which makes use of this principle. The soft, supple material of the patented Joya sole means the load on the sole of your feet is ideally distributed as you walk and stand instead of being concentrated only on certain spots.

Walk more in readiness for your holiday, and that means pounding the streets a bit with the correct shoes on to see how far you can walk without pain. Try and increase it a little every day as you would be surprised at how much more walking you do when you are away on holiday.

Sleep and rest enough ready for the travel which can drain you if it’s a long haul.

Plan your first 24 hours so that you give yourself time to get over the travel which will then help you to enjoy the rest of your holiday.

Research your destination IN FULL.  Look if there are any steps and how many there are to get from a to be. Find out how far away you are from any of the amenities that are available.

The most important thing is that you are prepared and can then enjoy your holiday without any problems.

 

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VIBRATION THERAPY AS A TREATMENT FOR FIBROMYALGIA PAIN…

Vibration Therapy is receiving a lot of attention at the moment, as it not only improves mobility in older people, but it can also help with the pain of Fibromyalgia and some types of Arthritis and also Osteoporosis. An excellent article on this subject can be found at the National Osteoporosis Society.

It has also been incorporated into insoles to improve balance. Vibration Therapy entails using a mechanical vibration machine to treat and prevent physical complaints including injuries and pain.

It is based on the scientific principle that all matter vibrates at a precise frequency and that by using resonant vibration, a balance of matter can be restored. Some researchers think that the vibration may over-ride pain signals going to the nervous system and thus leave you in less pain. It can also help with weight loss.

According to Health Line  ‘In 1867, Russian physician and inventor Gustav Zander developed an apparatus that used weights and pulleys to create a sense of vibration. Its purpose was therapeutic. In 1895, Dr. John Harvey Kellogg implemented vibration therapy in his health practice. Using a vibrating chair he developed himself, he claimed it could help improve circulation and alleviate constipation.

During the Russian space program, doctors found that astronauts suffered from bone loss and fractures at a much younger age than normal. They began to use vibration therapy to help strengthen astronauts’ bone mass and muscles. Today, NASA continues to use vibration therapy to help prevent bone loss.

More research is needed on the potential health benefits and risks of vibration therapy. Some evidence suggests it may help treat certain conditions. It may also pose some risks’.

News Medical says that ‘while traditional exercises included aerobic activities, stretching, and relaxation techniques performed twice a week (90 min/day), the group that received vibration therapy followed up the exercises with vibration.

There was a group of patients who received only the exercise programme without the vibrations and a group that did not receive either therapy.

After six weeks of this regimen, the patients were rated according to their pain, fatigue, stiffness, and depression scores.

Results showed that there was a significant reduction in scores for pain and fatigue with vibration therapy but little improvement in stiffness and depression scores.’

There are also Tens machines that work on electronic muscle stimulation as well. However, these should not be tried unless you have got the go-ahead from your GP.

 

ANTIDEPRESSANTS FOR CHRONIC LOWER BACK PAIN…

I read an article recently in The Daily Mail Good Health about how antidepressants may reduce chronic lower back pain.

In the journal Pain Medicine, a study led by Fukushima Medical University in Japan, 150 patients were given the antidepressant duloxetine once a day for a year. Their pain levels dropped significantly from the second week onwards. One theory, they say, is that antidepressants raise levels of the brain chemical serotonin in the spinal cord, which reduces the pain.

Serotonin is a contributor to feelings of well-being and happiness. The NHS point out how they think serotonin works. It’s thought that SSRIs work by increasing serotonin levels in the brain.

Serotonin is a neurotransmitter (a messenger chemical that carries signals between nerve cells in the brain). It’s thought to have a good influence on mood, emotion and sleep.

After carrying a message, serotonin is usually reabsorbed by the nerve cells (known as “reuptake”). SSRIs work by blocking (“inhibiting”) reuptake, meaning more serotonin is available to pass further messages between nearby nerve cells.

It would be too simplistic to say that depression and related mental health conditions are caused by low serotonin levels, but a rise in serotonin levels can improve symptoms and make people more responsive to other types of treatment, such as CBT.

I have taken a number of different types of antidepressants for my back pain and they have swapped me around every now and then to try a different one. At the moment I am taking Nortriptyline which I have found the best of all to help me get a more comfortable sleep. The only problem with all these types of medications is that you can soon find them hard to come off if you have taken them for a while, but if they work then that’s all that matters.

 

TURMERIC THE NEW HEALTH SUPPLEMENT FOR A NUMBER OF COMPLAINTS…

Turmeric has many healing powers and has become the latest supplement being used for a number of complaints including pain, improve brain function and even tackle cancer.

The root which comes from India, is apparently being added to everything from health supplements to juices and beauty products says The Mail’s Good Health.

Professor Susan Hewlings, a dietitian at Central Michigan University who co-authored an extensive 2017 scientific review on the spice said that ‘Increasing evidence suggest curcumin reduces levels of damaging inflammatory protiens released by our cells and therefore has the potential to help many inflammation-based disease like arthrtitis, dementia, diabetes, heart disease and cancer. Even the NHS dietitian Dr Sarah Schenker says that ‘the research on turmeric’s anti-inflammatory effects in the body are very promising.’

Turmeric is available as a tea, in a capsules, as a drink shot, as a spread, as a daily oral spray, as a drink, and even as a clay mask for your face, but before you start taking this on a regular basis you should check it with your Doctor first. The Bad Back Company sell the 10,000mg Turmeric Tablets for £19.95

BACK PAIN IS ON THE RISE…

Back pain is on the rise according to the Shropshire Star. They write that newly-released analysis by Imperial College London shows that 56,154 people in the Shropshire Council area and 29,589 people in Telford and Wrekin reported suffering from back pain in 2012. 

It accounted for 18 per cent of the population, slightly higher than the England average of 17 per cent. 

The data was collected from Public Health England’s Health Survey, and analysed by Imperial College for the charity Versus Arthritis. 

Only people who were in pain at the time of the survey, and had been in pain for at least three months, were counted in the figures. 

That means the data is likely to be an underestimate of the prevalence of the condition, since acute bouts of back pain can be resolved within a three-month period. 

Three out of five declared sufferers in Shropshire reported having severe back pain – a total of 33,552 people. 

Almost two-thirds of declared sufferers in Telford and Wrekin – 18,921 people – also reported having severe back pain.

NHS England say Back pain is the largest single cause of disability in the UK, with lower back pain alone accounting for 11% of the total disability of the UK population. Referrals for spinal surgery are increasing year on year and a growing number of patients are waiting longer than 18 weeks from referral to treatment.