THE RIGHT CARE FOR FIBROMYALGIA AND MYOFASCIAL PAIN BOOK REVIEW…

Fibromyalgia and Myofascial Pain Syndrome: A self-help guide

Fibromyalgia and Myofascial Pain Syndrome written by Dr Chris Jenner, one of the UK’s leading consultants on pain control, who works as a consultant in Pain Medicine and Anaesthesia at St. Mary’s Hospital, London.

The book gives you advice on managing your Fibromyalgia by becoming an expert patient.

The lack of knowledge which Dr Jenner says surrounds two of the most prevalent illnesses in the world today means that you can often go undiagnosed for years. But with the right care, there is much that can be done to help anyone with these conditions to improve their quality of life dramatically.

This book will help educate you about the conditions and explain how to deal with them, in a clear and down-to-earth way. It explains how these conditions might affect different aspects of your life, what your options are and how you can get on with your life.

Another book also was written by Dr Chris Jenner in 2014 – Fibromyalgia and Myofascial Pain Syndrome: How to manage this painful condition and improve the quality of your life.

This book explains that with the right care, there is much that can be done to help anyone with fibromyalgia or myofascial pain syndrome to improve their quality of life dramatically. This book is an easy-to-read and practical guide to dealing with these conditions. It takes a straightforward and down-to-earth look at what these conditions are about; how they might affect different aspects of sufferers’ lives; what their options are; and how they can get on with their lives.

This is an excellent read for any Fibromyalgia and/or Myofascial Pain sufferer like myself.

Fibromyalgia and Myofascial Pain Syndrome: How to manage this painful condition and improve the quality of your life

 

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THE SALI STUDY (SIGNIFICANT ANKLE LIGAMENT INJURY)& DAY FOUR AFTER INJURY…

It’s four days since I went over on my foot and sprained my ankle. Even with crutches the effort of getting up and downstairs on my back side was playing havoc with my low back but today I think I’ve turned the corner.

I’ve managed on one crutch for most of today and could walk down one step at a time on the stairs and got a fairly good nights sleep last night. I knew the crutches would bother my arm and neck but I forgot about the crawling I had done after I went over on my foot and what trouble the stairs could cause me.

I’ve been religiously doing exercises I found online for a sprained ankle as it soon goes stiff but it’s no where near as swollen as I have been using one of my five a day vegetables to freeze the ankle and reduce the swelling 🙂

Over the past 48 hours I’ve kept myself busy by making some new handmade cards. I’ve created some new styles to my usual ones using needlecraft and painting some of them. Do let me know what you think of them?

After I’d seen the nurse at A&E she asked me if I would mind joining a study which is researching the recovery from significant ankle ligament injury’s. The purpose of the study called SALI, is all about Osteoarthritis. I will be sent a questionnaires to fill in shortly after my injury, 3 months, 1 Year, 3 Years, 5 Years, 10 Years and 15 years. The study will help them understand why some people who have an ankle injury go on to develop osteoarthritis, and why others don’t.

Of course I said I was happy to take part as this study will mean I am part of and contributing to a large body of research being conducted within The Arthritis Research UK Centre for Sport, Exercise and Osteoarthritis. They said I will be sent updates on the SALI study with a newsletter, and kept up to date with any developments regarding the study, ankle injury prevention and recovery from it, and other news of interest which I can then post on here for others to benefit from.

I really hope I don’t end up developing Osteoarthritis due to this ankle injury and I am now keeping my fingers crossed that my appointment with a spinal consultant on Tuesday will mean that I will soon be booked in for an injection.

CERVICAL DISC PROTRUSION AND ARTHRITIS…

After the brilliant guest post from Neil Velleman on ‘All you need to know about a slipped discI found myself being diagnosed with yet another disc problem in my cervical spine.

For the last six months, I have been having constant pain going down my arm from my neck as well as pins and needles down to my little finger.  Initially, we thought it may have been my ulnar nerve again. I say ‘again’ as I had surgery last year for a trapped ulnar nerve which was a total success but they said it can come back even after surgery.

After a 2 hour consultation with a physiotherapist, it was decided that it could be one of two things. Either the ulnar nerve or a disc in my cervical spine so the first port of call was a nerve conduction test.

The nerve conduction test showed no problem with the ulnar nerve so I was then sent to have an MRI scan. Those results have shown that I have another disc bulge which is compressing a nerve and giving me the pins and needles and pain and it also showed that I have arthritis in that area.

Neil Velleman explained that ‘the spinal discs act as shock absorbers and through a variety of causes, including injury, poor posture and general “wear and tear” (meaning gradual deterioration), the walls of the disc can become weaker. If the centre of the disc pushes out, this can cause the disc wall to bulge and that can be when pain strikes!’

Mine is definitely in the ‘wear and tear’ category as I have had two previous surgeries on the C3/4 area of my spine which has meant the disc below it has had to do all the work. I have now been told I will need to see a consultant about the sort of treatment they can give me for the pain which could be IDD Therapy, Injections, Manual Therapy or Surgery.

Back in 1996 when I had my second surgery on the C3/4 discs they gave me traction first but IDD Therapy seems to have taken over from that method but I shall just have to wait and see what they suggest.

The worst pain is doing the simplest of things like cleaning my teeth or drying my hair so I am just hoping an appointment comes through sooner rather than later.

SEPTEMBER #PAIN AWARENESS MONTH…

The first Pain Awareness Month was held in 2001 and since then the event has gone from strength to strength – Around 75 million Americans are suffering pain and it’s time to do something about it.  Awareness will be raised by the American Pain Foundation Action Network to this huge problem so that politicians are focused on the need for new research and treatments. The month also ties in with National Invisible Chronic Illness Awareness Week.  More suffers will have the chance to voice their pain via blogging and virtual conferences. The key to raising awareness is to get involved. There are many things that you can do to help promote Pain Awareness Month. Talk with Friends & Family: Let them know that September is Pain Awareness Month. “Like” the ACPA on Facebook. Encourage your friends to do the same. Everyone who lives with chronic pain—or cares about someone who does—is different. But at the same time, we all have common interests. It is a kind of community and deserves to have their voices heard. Partners for Understanding Pain represents a comprehensive network of resources and knowledge about issues in pain management. Pain Awareness Toolkits provide information for working collaboratively with healthcare professionals, consumer and professional organizations, journalists, community leaders, and elected officials to ensure that those who suffer from pain have access to appropriate and effective pain therapies. At the moment it is based around the website American Chronic Pain Association and not in the UK but that doesn’t mean UK sufferers cannot help to promote Pain Awareness Month.

5 ACTS OF KINDNESS THAT HAVE BROUGHT ME JOY WHILE IN PAIN…

Simple acts of kindness can bring joy to anyone in pain.

My favourite acts of kindness that have brought me joy while in pain are –

  1. Someone offering to carry things for me.
  2. A cup of tea in bed.
  3. A phone call from a loved one.
  4. Someone giving me their seat.
  5. A note from a loved one saying ‘Thinking of You’.

What are yours?