MY HIP BURSITIS AND THE TREATMENT FOR IT…

What is bursitis?

A bursa is a closed fluid-filled sac that functions as a gliding surface to reduce friction between tissues of the body. “Bursae” is the plural form of “bursa.” The major bursae are located adjacent to the tendons near the large joints, such as the shoulders, elbows, hips, and knees. When a bursa becomes inflamed, the condition is known as “bursitis.”

Hip bursitis is –

  • A bursa is a fluid-filled sac that functions as a gliding surface to reduce friction between moving tissues of the body.
  • There are two major bursae of the hip.
  • Bursitis, or inflammation of a bursa, is usually not infectious, but the bursa can become infected.
  • Treatment of noninfectious bursitis includes rest, ice, and medications for inflammation and pain. Infectious bursitis (uncommon) is treated with antibiotics, aspiration, and surgery.
  • Bursitis of the hip is the most common cause of hip pain.
  • Trochanteric bursitis frequently causes tenderness of the outer hip.
  • Ischial bursitis can cause dull pain in the upper buttock area.

I saw a hip consultant last week for pain in my hips, mainly my right side. He sent me for an X-ray which showed medial osteoarthritis in the right hip but I had no symptoms or problems on examination for this problem.

What he did find was that I was very tender over the bursa area on my right and also on my left hip which he diagnosed as Bursitis. I was then given a steroid injection into both Bursas in the hope this would relieve my pain.

He also noticed how much discomfort I was in when he touched my sacroiliac joint and in my midline so he is sending me for an MRI of my sacroiliac joint and lumbosacral spine to make sure there is no impingement and to see if there is any inflammation of the sacroiliac joint.

It may be that I require a CT guided injection of my sacroiliac joint if there is arthritis seen on my scan so I will just have to wait for this result after my scan in a couple of weeks.

My pain after the injection initially went much worse and I had a really bad night but within 24 hours I could actually lie on my left hip without pain. My right took about another 24 hrs for it to kick in but I still get low back and sacroiliac pain when I lie on that side so it could be the pain is more related to that problem.

Steroid injections is something I’ve had in the past for my lumber spine and neck. Some work and last for months, others not so long but I always think this type of treatment for your pain is worth trying.

THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN OSTEOPENIA AND OSTEOPOROSIS…

If, like me you had never heard of osteopenia then I will explain what this condition is. Web MD write that you should think of it as a midpoint between having healthy bones and having osteoporosis.

Osteopenia is when your bones are weaker than normal but not so far gone that they break easily, which is the hallmark of osteoporosis. Your bones are usually at their densest when you’re about 30. Osteopenia, if it happens at all, usually occurs after age 50. The exact age depends how strong your bones are when you’re young. If they’re hardy, you may never get osteopenia. If your bones aren’t naturally dense, you may get it earlier.

Osteopenia — or seeing it turn into osteoporosis for that matter — is not inevitable. Dietexercise, and sometimes medication can help keep your bones dense and strong for decades.

Recently I was asked to go for a bone scan to look for osteoporosis due to ongoing pain in both my hips, or at least that was what I thought the scan was for. The results came back that I have osteopenia and I have now been put on some medication and they are arranging for me to see a Physiotherapist to start some core strength and weight bearing exercises to avoid it turning into osteoporosis.

When I asked the GP if this was causing my hip pain she said there is no pain associated with osteopenia unless you break a bone. My GP then started asking me a few questions about my hip pain and asked me to pop over and see her. She is now 99% sure that I am suffering from bursitis and is referring me to an Orthopedic Consultant. So, from the pain clinic sending me for a bone scan for hip pain which showed osteopenia I now also have another problem with bursitis which I will cover in another post.

Ortho Atlanta explains about osteopenia and osteoporosis that while these diseases do have some similarities, there are also distinct differences between them. Here’s what you need to know about the differences between osteoporosis and osteopenia.

Osteoporosis means “porous bones.” Bones that are porous, or less dense, are more likely to break. A person with osteoporosis may also walk with a stooped back. Osteopenia is considered a midway point to osteoporosis; the bone density is lower than normal but not as severe and treating it may slow the progression bone loss that leads to osteoporosis. Bone mineral density (BMD) measures the level of calcium in the bones. The lower this level is, the more likely a person is to sustain bone fractures. Osteoporosis and osteopenia are both diseases in which the bone density is low. 

Serious injuries can occur as a result of osteoporosis. Because persons diagnosed with osteoporosis have lost a lot of bone mass, their bones, more porous, and brittle, can fracture from something as simple as a sneeze or a minor fall. Fractures caused by osteoporosis most often occur in the spine. Known as vertebral compression fractures, fractures in the spine are almost twice as common as other fractures typically linked to osteoporosis, such as broken hips and wrists. Osteopenia isn’t quite as serious as osteoporosis because the bones aren’t as porous and measures can be taken to help prevent the onset of osteoporosis

Osteoporosis can’t be reversed; however, it can be managed using the same treatments recommended for osteopenia. In addition to diet and exercise, there are medications the doctor may recommend to help prevent further bone loss.

NERVE ROOT BLOCK INJECTION FOR BACK PAIN…

The term nerve root block is one that many people find quite daunting and it sounds a very dramatic procedure.

However, it is a very safe and routine procedure to help manage/diagnose chronic pain conditions which are associated with nerve roots.

The injection is like many others I have written on and is first a local anaesthetic that is injected along with a steroid.

Because there is a local anaesthetic in the injection, the nerve will immediately be numbed. This then acts as a confirmation that the pain is actually being caused by a specific nerve and it will provide the patient with pain relief.

The steroid is also used to try and reduce inflammation that often occurs in the area near the nerve root and the discs in your back. Reducing this inflammation can actually provide relatively long term relief from pain, because the pain itself can be caused simply by this inflammation.

MAY IS #FIBROMYALGIA AWARENESS MONTH…

 

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May is Fibromyalgia Awareness Month and ProHealth say, ‘Help us raise awareness and dispel the myths about this disease’. Write your story of Fibromyalgia on their site Fibromyalgia Awareness Healing Story Meaning originally written by Rebuilding Wellness. 

Zazzle an American site has a number of Fibromyalgia Awareness Gifts from t. shirts to key rings.  T. shirts are also available from Cafe Press UK. Another brilliant site for anything Fibro related is Fibro Blogger a Directory of People who Blog about Fibromyalgia. So, if you blog about people join this amazing directory of Fibro Bloggers.

There is also a Facebook Site which is promoting May 12th as ‘International ME/CFS/& FM Awareness Day’ so pop over and give them a tick or a donation to help raise awareness of these diseases.

SIX FACTS ABOUT FIBROMYALGIA…

  1. It is a real disorder with measurable biological abnormalities.
  2. There is a specific set of diagnostic criteria developed by the American College of Rheumatology to be used for diagnosing Fibromyalgia.
  3. It affects men, women, and children of all ages.
  4. Several studies have revealed markers of inflammation in Fibromyalgia.
  5. Exercise, when done properly, can help to reduce Fibromyalgia symptoms.
  6. Although there is no cure for Fibromyalgia, it can be managed with the right combination of treatments and therapies.

Infographic 25 invisible symptoms of fibromyalgia

TOP TIPS ON HOW TO COOK WITHOUT BEING IN TO MUCH PAIN…

Coping with Fibromyalgia is hard enough for any of us but one of the biggest problems we face is cooking. It may sound stupid to others but to us its a chore that can leave us feeling exhausted and in pain.

Many of us find that we cannot stand for long periods of time so doing the vegetables or decorating a cake are painful for us.

The easiest way to get around these problems is to plan ahead for the week.

If you have some children or a partner at home that can help prepare some meals, then delegate the difficult jobs for them to do.

Concentrate on foods with multiple uses by making a stew that can last two meals, like a roast chicken, followed by a chicken salad or a chicken curry.

Crockpots can be a godsend in the winter for Fibromyalgia sufferers, just get help with your preparation of vegetables then pop it all in the pot and forget about it until its mealtime.

Try and have one afternoon where you could cook three or four meals in one hit, using left-overs to make soup or casseroles, and only cook when you are ‘in less pain or on a good day’. If your best time is in the morning then cook then, if it’s in the afternoon then cook then.

I get my husband to prepare all the vegetables for me and nearly always make two meals at one time. I love baking (one would never have known!) and keep all my ingredients in a basket which I can put on the table which enables me to sit down to bake.

It is a bit easier at this time of year as casseroles are ideal and you can get vegetable packs for those, just throw in a bit of garlic, a red wine stock pot and bobs your uncle.

Health Central say Why Stand When You Can Sit: The reason why cooking is so painful for most people is the prolonged periods of time standing and walking around. Try moving that cutting board to the table and chop while sitting. Try moving those green beans to the living room and snap while sitting or reclining. Remember to sit properly and get up properly when it is time to stand up.

Eating Well have six great tips on how to avoid back pain while cooking.

Get a supportive mat. Adding soft cushioning beneath your feet in the form of a foam or gel mat may make you more comfortable while slicing and dicing. Use a cookbook stand. Think about how much time you spend hunched over the countertop reading a cookbook. Store heavy items wisely. Quit crouching down low or getting on your tiptoes to reach for large, weighty items like the food processor, panini press, mixer, or bread machine. Be careful when bending. Whether you’re bending down to pick up a dropped carrot or your stand mixer, you want your legs to do the work of lifting, not your back. Speaking of workouts: Exercise your abs. Having a strong core will help keep your back strong, and finally, Take breaks. Often, cooking calls for a “hurry up and wait” approach.