#backpainblog, #BACKPAINBLOGUK, backpainbloguk, back pain, chronic pain, fibromyalgia, health, chromic pain, reviews, #fibro, #fibro-flare, #fibromyalgia, #Quotes, Back Pain, back pain blog, chronic pain, CHRONIC PAIN

WHAT IS THE BIGGEST CAUSE OF A FIBROMYALGIA FLARE-UP?…

What is the biggest cause of a Fibromyalgia flare-up? Well, apparently it’s The Weather – which I am sure most of us knew that anyway. The UK is experiencing the second heatwave of this summer and I know I am suffering at the moment. How about you?

Fibromyalgia flare-ups are a temporary increase in the number and/or intensity of symptoms.  A flare-up can be different from person to person, but for many, it means severe pain, with little to no let-up. A flare-up likely includes debilitating fatigue, even to the point of feeling weak and unable to stand or walk for much length of time. Luckily, worsening symptoms usually have a distinct cause, and with the right approach, they can be treated directly and effectively.

Get to the bottom of intensifying fibro fatigue and discomfort before you try to treat it. Some flare-ups can last a few days to a few weeks and there are a number of causes for them.

Temperature makes a difference in how we feel with Fibro but it can also affect other musculoskeletal disorders. Colder weather seems to make symptoms worse whereas a climate where the temperature remains warmer seems to be less painful for Fibro sufferers.

Arthritis Foundation writes that “People with fibromyalgia do not all experience flares the same way,” Dr Clauw says. “A good way to explain it is that every person with fibromyalgia has their Achilles heel – their ‘thing’ that really gives them trouble. When their fibromyalgia worsens, that particular thing really gets bad.”

There are obviously many other triggers that can create a flare-up which include – physical or psychological stress, hormonal changes, travelling, changes in treatment, diet or poor sleep.

There are five “major weather factors” that can affect our bodies. They are temperature, barometric pressure, humidity, precipitation and wind. We may not be able to control what the weather does, but we can take some steps to try and head off a #fibro flare before it occurs when it is time for a seasonal change.

Researchers have been unable to determine why the changes in weather affect sufferers, however, there are some possible explanations. Firstly, changes in temperature can affect sleep patterns. Getting plenty of sleep is really important if you have fibromyalgia, and even small shifts in your sleep pattern can aggravate the condition. Secondly, as the seasons change, the amount of light you are exposed to can throw off your circadian rhythm (body clock), making you feel low and more tired than usual. Lastly, there may be a connection between low temperatures and pro-inflammatory cytokines, which appear to be connected to pain intensity.

Make a note in your diary of a particular treatment that helped or medication or piece of equipment like a tens machine that helped. Knowing that there is something you can do, use or otherwise for your flare-up, will get you through the worst days and back to controlling it as you normally do.

Do not push yourself. Go slow. Be gentle with yourself. If you can’t do the laundry for a few days, that’s okay. Also, if you can’t get the house cleaned this week, that’s okay.

If you have to cancel plans, that’s okay, do not feel guilty about it. Treat yourself the same way you would a friend that was going through a hard time.

Source: Arthritis Foundation

#blog award, #Spoonie, Back Pain, CHRONIC PAIN, complementary therapies, FIBROMYALGIA, HEALTH, pain, pain relief

THE BOWEN TECHNIQUE – A TREATMENT FOR CHRONIC PAIN…

The Bowen Technique has now joined the group of complementary therapies to be recognised by the Complementary and Natural Healthcare Council (CNHC) which provides an independent national standard of excellence.

CNHC is the only voluntary regulatory body for complementary healthcare to have official backing from the government. Its key function is to enhance public protection by setting standards for registration with CNHC.

The BOWEN technique was developed by Thomas Ambrose Bowen an osteopath from Australia in the 1960s and 1970s.

It has been called miraculous and is a soft tissue remedial therapy that involves the therapist using fingers and thumbs to move over muscles, ligaments, tendons and fascia in various body parts.

The Bowen technique’s main feature is that the therapist leaves the patient to rest for a short while, allowing the body to decide what action needs to be taken in response to the moves given (sounds sooooo relaxing).

In Bowen Therapy, as well as the muscles, you work on the fascia. Fascia is an important, highly mobile, connective tissue, which runs throughout your body. It is via the fascia that we often address levels of tension and discomfort.

We purposefully move the fascia in a particular way to stimulate or relax muscle fibres in order to achieve:

  • Improved posture and flexibility
  • Pain relief
  • Improved mobility

You will also feel less stressed following a treatment, having taken time out of busy schedules to address your issues.

It’s a gentle non-invasive relaxing therapy to help free the body to its natural balance and healing. The Bowen Technique is a recognised hands-on complementary therapy, which many turn to for significant relief from troubling aches and pains and (often) to address long-standing problems.

The therapist uses only the thumbs and fingers to make gentle rolling movements over precise junctions of muscles, nerve pathways and blood and lymph circulation with periods of rest in between to allow the body to assimilate and respond to the information.

These moves send signals via the brain to the body’s soft tissues to realign and relax so that they can return to their natural, healthy state before tension or injury occurred. Pain is then released as the process of healing begins.

Increasing awareness and understanding of the role of fascia within the body have underpinned our appreciation that the body should be looked at holistically (as a whole). 

The Bowen Therapy Professional Association is an independent organisation of Bowen Therapists run by Bowen Therapists. The website is full of information on the Bowen Technique and has a list of therapists.

You can also find a great video on youtube on how the Bowen Technique can help with the pain of Fibromyalgia.

There is also a great book on the subject Bowtech – The Original Bowen Technique: Healing the body gently, Releasing pain and tension Paperback – by Manfred Zanzinger (Author), Sabine Knoll (Author)

Source: Bowen Therapy Bowen Technique Bowen Association CNHC

#backpainblog, #BACKPAINBLOGUK, backpainbloguk, back pain, chronic pain, fibromyalgia, health, chromic pain, reviews, #health, #lowbackpain, #pain, #Quotes, BACK PAIN, back pain blog, chronic pain, CHRONIC PAIN, sciatica

MY NEXT TYPE OF INJECTION FOR PAIN IS BILATERAL SACROILIAC JOINT RADIOFREQUENCY ABLATION…

I am going back to the hospital next week for a different type of injection for the pain in my sacroiliac joints called radiofrequency ablation which I am having in both sacroiliac joints.

I have previously had facet joint injections, trigger points, and nerve blocks to name a few but radiofrequency ablation is quite different from any of these.

A radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of the sacroiliac joint (SI joint) is a procedure that uses radio waves to heat and destroys the nerves. These nerves carry pain signals from the injured sacroiliac joint to the brain. Radiofrequency ablation of the sacroiliac joint is often recommended for patients who have received short-term pain relief after injecting the SI joint with numbing/steroid medicine but have had unsuccessful results with later therapy.

The best pain relief I have ever had was my after my SI joint steroid injections last December. I had not felt such pain relief for years so my consultant knew that we had hit the right spot and hoped it would last a long time. Unfortunately, the pain relief only lasted for a couple of months but because it had worked initially it meant my next procedure would be the radiofrequency ablation procedure.

The sacroiliac joint is a large joint in the lower back joining the iliac bone to the sacrum. You have two joints, one on each side. Inflammation or arthritic changes in these joints can cause pain, either in the back, or referred areas around the back, side in the buttocks or lower limbs.

The treatment involves…

  • A small needle is placed in the back of your hand for sedation or emergency drugs.
  • SIJ RFD is performed lying face down.
  • Your back is cleaned. The skin is numbed with some local anaesthetic.
  • A special X-ray and a radiofrequency generator machine will be used by the doctor to identify the location of the nerve.
  • Electrical tests will enable the tip of the specially designed needle to get close to the nerve. The final electrical test is done to make sure that the needle tip is well away from the main spinal nerve to your leg, thereby improving the safety of the procedure.
  • When the doctor is happy with the needle position, local anaesthetic is injected before a high frequency (radiofrequency) electrical signal is passed down the needle for 90 seconds.
  • After each lesion, the area is injected with a mixture of local anaesthetic and steroid, to help reduce discomfort afterwards.
  • I am being put to sleep for this procedure but with a heavy sedative and not a general anaesthetic. Some patients just have a mild sedative.

Of course, no surgery comes without possible risks but at only 1% it is well worth giving this a try.

The risks include:
• Allergic reaction to the medication
• Nerve damage
• Bleeding and bruising at the injection site
• Pain at the injection site or during the injection
• Infection
• Injection of medication into a blood vessel
• No improvement or worsening of your pain in some cases

I have been told that on the day after the procedure, I can cautiously return to my regular activities, but most require an additional 2 days of rest. My back and buttock will usually be very sore during the next few days. The pain will slowly improve over several weeks. This pain is usually caused by muscle spasms and irritability while the targeted nerves are dying from the heat lesion. Pain relief usually is not experienced until about 2-3 weeks after the procedure when the nerves have completely died. My back may feel odd or slightly weak for several weeks after the procedure. There is a rare chance (less than 5%) that you may have increased nerve pain following the procedure for 1-3 months.

The nerves can grow back over a period of months eventually causing the pain to return. If this happens the procedure can usually be repeated or another alternative is to have your sacroiliac joints fused.

Source: Spine Universe, NHS, Med