TOP TIPS ON HOW TO MANAGE ARTHRITIS PAIN…

5 top tips on how to manage arthritis from your home from consultant orthopaedic surgeon Mr Faisal Hussain from BMI The Priory and BMI The Edgbaston hospitals.

Mr Hussain explains that ‘more than 10 million people in the UK are living with arthritis.‘ His five top tips to improve your health and quality of life, allowing you to live better with arthritis are :

1. Keep Active

2. Get a good night’s sleep

3. Look after your mental well-being

4. Eat for health

5. Maintain a healthy weight

For a more detailed description of how to manage the above tips go to the BMI website here.

Everyday Health say some lifestyle changes can help you manage pain and they include the same tips as above but also say Get vitamin C. Studies have shown that vitamin C may be helpful in managing inflammation in the body. So dig into an orange or pour yourself a glass of grapefruit juice each day.

They also say Avoid alcohol. Don’t medicate yourself with alcohol to manage pain; it will only create more problems, and add calories to your diet.

Healthline suggest trying hot and cold therapy (details on this on their website), try acupuncture or meditation and include the right fatty acids for your diet. Everyone needs omega-3 fatty acids in their diet for optimum health. These fats also help your arthritis. Fish oil supplements, which are high in omega-3s, have been shown to reduce joint stiffness and pain. Also try adding turmeric to your recipes.

Another tip is to get a massage. According to the Arthritis Foundation, regular massaging of arthritic joints can help reduce pain and stiffness and improve your range of motion. Work with a physical therapist to learn self-massage, or schedule appointments with a massage therapist regularly.

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12 YOGA POSES TO HELP ALLEVIATE BACK PAIN…

Yoga is an amazing way to help ease back pain but without supervision could cause harm so please do not try any of the above poses unless you have done yoga before. The NHS website has a guide to yoga and says that ‘Dozens of scientific trials of varying quality have been published on yoga and while there’s scope for more rigorous studies on its health benefits, most studies suggest yoga is a safe and effective way to increase physical activity, especially strength, flexibility and balance.’

There is also some evidence that regular yoga practice is beneficial for people with high blood pressure, heart disease, aches and pains – including lower back pain – depression and stress but they say that most forms of yoga are not strenuous enough (boo hoo) to count towards your 150 minutes of moderate activity, as set out by government guidelines.

 

SLEEP SUNDAY, LET’S TALK ABOUT SLEEP AND PILLOW SPRAYS…

Let’s talk about sleep and the use of pillow sprays this Sunday. My top 5 calming pillow sprays for a peaceful night’s sleep are-

1. Grass & Co CALM Pillow Spray 50 ml – £17.50 this pillow spray contains Distilled Aqua, Anthemis nobilis (Chamomile Essential Oil), Rosmarinus Officinalis (Rosemary Essential Oil),  Limon (Lemon Essential Oil) Organic Alcohol, D-Limonene. It is 100% Natural. THC & Toxin-Free, (as recommended by netdoctor). A CALM Pillow Spray balances the comforting aromatherapy scents of luxurious Lemon, relaxing Rosemary and calming Chamomile to quieten your mind and soothe you to your sleepy place. Awake feeling calmed. Mist onto your pillow and bed linen to bring calm, peace and tranquility to your bedtime ritual. This is my favourite pillow spray at the moment. When I wake up in the night ( which I often do) I reach for the spray and soon find myself feeling relaxed and calm.

2. This Works Deep Sleep Pillow Spray 75 ml – £19.50 this pillow spray contains Fragrance mixture (Linalool; Linalyl Acetate; Vetiverols; Ocimene; Caryophyllene; Terpentine-4-ol; beta-Pinene; d-Limonene; 1-Octen-3-yl acetate; Geraniol). They say ‘Get a great night’s sleep with our best-selling deep sleep pillow spray. Proven to help you fall asleep faster and wake feeling more refreshed. Use at bedtime to help reduce sleep anxiety and improve sleep quality. Award-winning natural, aromatherapeutic Superblend of Lavender, Vetivert and Camomile calms both mind and body, soothing you to sleep.’ This is my second choice as I just adore lavender and in this particular spray it has a lovely strong smell of it.

3. M&S Collection Pillow Sleep Spray 200 ml – £6.50 it contains Aqua, propylene glycol, phenoxyethanol, peg-40 hydrogenated castor oil, ethylhexylglycerin, lavandula angustifolia oil, disodium edta, and denatonium benzoate. In their wordsCreate a calming atmosphere at bedtime with our aromatic pillow spray. From our Body and Soul collection, the spray helps to bring feelings of tranquillity and sleepiness to your bedroom. Spray it onto your pillow at the end of the day and relax into a dreamy slumber. This is my afternoon rest pillow spray to help me just rest and relax for an hour. It works for me.

4. Neon Organics Perfect Night’s Sleep Pillow Mist 5 ml – £8 the ingredients in this spray is 100% natural fragrances. Their words ‘this really special complex blend using only 100% natural fragrances with 14 of the purest possible dreamy essential oils including English lavender, chamomile & patchouli plus little touches of other perfectly chosen natural essential oils expertly blended to help you relax and prepare for sleep. Use the Pillow Mist for maximum quality and quantity of zzz’s’. This is a great size to pop in your bag for a weekend break.

5. L’Occitane En Provence Relaxing Pillow Mist 100 ml – £19.00 Made with essential oils, this mist creates a calming atmosphere that promotes relaxation and well-being. I was given a sample size of this in a gift with other products and felt I had a good night’s sleep but probably needed to try it for a lot longer but the smell makes you feel relaxed straight away.

HANNA SOMATIC EDUCATION THERAPY FOR CHRONIC PAIN AND DEPRESSION…

Hanna Somatic Education (aka HSE) teaches you how to release muscles that have involuntarily contracted. Thomas Hanna, PhD developed Hanna Somatic Education over the course of two decades of work in the field of Somatic Education. He began as a Feldenkrais practitioner, and developed his own method of Somatic Education after studying neurology at the University of Miami Medical School.

It was there that he did research into the muscular ways in which all humans respond to stress reflexes and how these full body reflexes can habituate at the level of the central nervous system, causing muscular pain that contributes to many common pain conditions. Clinical Somatic Education developed from the hands-on methods of Thomas Hanna as well as other innovations from present-day somatic pioneers.

There are only a few Somatic therapists in the UK and one is Jonathan Hunt, a former Premiership footballer who had to retire in 2003 due to back pain. When manipulative therapies failed to help him, he tried the Hanna Somatic programme and was so impressed that he trained as a therapist himself.

Everyday Health said tensing our muscles is so automatic for many of us that we don’t know how to hold our bodies in any other way. Hans Selye, a famous endocrinologist, once said, “all of life is stress.” Our reaction to our daily stress gets absorbed into our bodies; if we’re not aware of it, we can go days, months, years, even an entire lifetime in a state of amnesia — called sensory-motor amnesia.

Sensory-motor amnesia is a “habituated state of forgetfulness of how certain muscles feel and how to effectively coordinate them” — chronic muscular contractions that lead to the common physical complaints that we usually mistake for the natural aging process, according to the Novato Institute for Somatic Research and Training.

Some of the suggested exercises for backache are: Lie on your back, arms resting by your side, knees bent, and feet hip-width apart tucked up near your bottom. As you breathe in, arch your lower back by pressing your tail bone down, then very slowly flatten your back into the floor as you exhale, to relax. Rest, and then repeat slowly and gently ten to 15 times. When you finish, straighten and stretch your legs. Don’t attempt any of these until you have checked with your GP first and don’t overdo them as they should be comfortable.